/var/www/html/apps.und.edu/uletterarchive/print_article.php:22:
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  'HEADLINE' => string 'Global Visions film series features "The Fast Runner"' (length=53)
  'MESSAGE' => string 'The Global Visions film series will feature "The Fast Runner" (Canana/Inuit) at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 11, at the Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union. The film is free.

"The Fast Runner" is not merely an interesting document from a far-off place; it is a masterpiece. Mr. Kunuk's film, which won the Caméra d'Or for best first feature at last year's Cannes International Film Festival, is much more than an ethnographic curiosity. It is, by any standard, an extraordinary film, a work of narrative sweep and visual b'... (length=2258)
  'NAME' => string 'Marcia Mikulak' (length=14)
  'TITLE' => string 'Assistant Professor' (length=19)
  'DEPT' => string 'Anthropology' (length=12)
  'EMAIL' => string 'marcia.mikulak@und.nodak.edu' (length=28)
  'PHONE' => string '777-4718' (length=8)
  'SIGNED' => string '1' (length=1)
Global Visions film series features "The Fast Runner"


The Global Visions film series will feature "The Fast Runner" (Canana/Inuit) at 7 p.m. Tuesday, March 11, at the Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union. The film is free.

"The Fast Runner" is not merely an interesting document from a far-off place; it is a masterpiece. Mr. Kunuk's film, which won the Caméra d'Or for best first feature at last year's Cannes International Film Festival, is much more than an ethnographic curiosity. It is, by any standard, an extraordinary film, a work of narrative sweep and visual beauty that honors the history of the art form even as it extends its perspective, said AO Scott, New York Times.

Zacharias Kunuk's first feature - as well as the first feature to be made in the Inuktitut language- is an epic account of an Inuit blood feud, shot in northernmost Canada. Mysterious, bawdy, emotionally intense, and replete with virtuoso throat singing, this three-hour movie is engrossing from first image to last, so devoid of stereotype and cosmic in its vision it could suggest the rebirth of cinema. As the arctic light and landscape beggar description, so the performances go beyond acting, and the production itself seems little short of miraculous, said Jim Hoberman, Village Voice.

The Department of Anthropology’s popular Global Visions Film Series brings an exciting array of films to the community of Grand Forks for the fifth consecutive year. The Global Visions Film Series presents two films per month in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. The series is currently the only venue in Grand Forks to view award-winning, nationally recognized independent films from a wide variety of contemporary film makers around the world.

All films are at 7 p.m. on various Tuesday evenings between now until the end of April at the UND Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. The series, free and open to the public, is partially funded by the Multicultural Awareness Committee. Filmgoers are encouraged to come early to ensure a seat.

Other movies will be:
• March 18 – The Weeping Meadow (Greece)
• April 8 – The Clay Bird (Bangladesh)
• April 22 – The Wind Will Carry Us (Iran)

This series is funded by the Multicultural Awareness Committee, and the Department of Anthropology and the Anthropology Club.
-- Marcia Mikulak, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, marcia.mikulak@und.nodak.edu, 777-4718