/var/www/html/apps.und.edu/uletterarchive/print_article.php:22:
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  'HEADLINE' => string 'UND astronomy team catches solar eclipse' (length=40)
  'MESSAGE' => string 'University physicist Tim Young and computer scientist Ron Marsh were on target Friday morning in French Guiana for a perfect view of the annular solar eclipse. Friday's annular eclipse -- with the Moon centered in the middle of the Sun's disc -- was only visible from a small geographic area on the northeastern corner of the South American continent, including French Guiana.

We had a fabulous view and we got it all into our live Webcast, which was picked up by thousands of viewers, said Young, whose resea'... (length=1090)
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  'DEPT' => string 'University Relations' (length=20)
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UND astronomy team catches solar eclipse


University physicist Tim Young and computer scientist Ron Marsh were on target Friday morning in French Guiana for a perfect view of the annular solar eclipse. Friday's annular eclipse -- with the Moon centered in the middle of the Sun's disc -- was only visible from a small geographic area on the northeastern corner of the South American continent, including French Guiana.

We had a fabulous view and we got it all into our live Webcast, which was picked up by thousands of viewers, said Young, whose research focuses on supernovae -- exploding stars -- and other astronomical events. We had clear skies. With the assistance of the Guiana Space Center, we were able to put on a great show of the five-minute, 30-second eclipse.

You can see the event, witnessed by several hundred school children on hilltops in the Guiana Space Center, on the team's web site at http://www.sems.und.edu .

Young and Marsh, who have covered and Webcast several eclipses, note that this eclipse was noteworthy because it caused people to wonder why the Moon was apparently smaller than the Sun.