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University Letter
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ISSUE: Volume 43, Number 18: January 6, 2006
 
TOP STORIES
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EVENTS TO NOTE
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ANNOUNCEMENTS
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IN REMEMBRANCE
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President Kupchella invited to education summit

President Charles Kupchella will join a select group of university leaders who’ve been invited to attend the U.S. University Presidents Summit on International Education Jan. 5-6 in Washington, D.C.

Kupchella was invited by U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings, the event co-sponsors. Fewer than 100 university administrators will attend the summit. Attendees will come from all 50 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico.

Secretaries Rice and Spellings will engage leaders of U.S. higher education in a renewed partnership to strengthen international education, emphasizing its importance to the national interest. Organized by the State Department’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, the summit is designed to initiate a dialogue on the need for government to work collaboratively with the non-governmental sector on the future of U.S. higher education in a global arena.
“Through this summit, Secretary Rice and Secretary Spellings and their respective departments want to reach out to college and university presidents to reinforce a common interest in attracting foreign students and scholars to U.S. institutions,” notes Karen Hughes, under secretary of state for public diplomacy and public affairs. “Of equal importance is seeking investment in educating globally competitive U.S. students to work in fields of international interest.”

The summit will focus on how to attract foreign students and scholars to study in the United States, as well as how to encourage more American students to receive part of their education abroad. In addition, participants will discuss marketing of U.S. higher education programs abroad, reaching out to underserved populations, understanding visa and regulatory processes, cooperating to meet exchange priorities, and utilizing fully the international education resources of community colleges.

The summit will also draw attention to the key investments required to strengthen international higher education for Americans, including increasing access to study abroad, encouraging non-traditional study abroad locations, strengthening non-traditional language acquisition, developing dynamic international strategies at U.S. universities and colleges, and engaging the public and private sectors in a shared national vision for the future.
UND already has a growing international student body, staff and faculty, with nearly 65 countries represented. The largest number of international students comes from Canada, followed by India, Norway, China, Cameroon. Russia, Nepal, Japan.

 

Center for Rural Health to examine American Indian veteran health

The Center for Rural Health will launch a project to study the health care needs of American Indian veterans in North Dakota.

The center will survey American Indian veterans on the four reservations and one tribal service area.
Twyla Baker-Demoray, a Hidatsa of the Mandan Hidatsa Arikara (MHA) Nation, will serve as project coordinator. Wendell White, an Arikara from the MHA Nation and a Vietnam veteran, will act as veteran coordinator. Based at the Fort Berthold reservation in west-central North Dakota, White will work with each tribal community to assemble an accurate listing of their veterans.

From that list, 500 veterans (100 from each tribal community that participates) will be randomly surveyed. The survey will ask about health risk behaviors, health screenings, health care access, and chronic diseases among veterans using face-to-face interviews. Those interviews will be conducted by native UND students or by members of Native veteran organizations on their home reservations. They will be trained by faculty and staff from the Center for Rural Health at the medical school.

The information gathered will be shared with the tribes, the North Dakota Department of Health and the Department of Veteran’s Affairs (VA). The information and will be used by tribal, state and federal policy makers to develop policy to address the needs of American Indian veterans.

“Increased coordination of services between the VA and the Indian Health Service is needed to address our veterans’ health needs,” said Dr. Leander (Russ) McDonald, who is heading the project. “We hope that the information that will result from this study will help close that gap.”

“What is needed on the reservations is awareness,” said McDonald. “Many of our vets are not aware of possible entitlements they have. We hope to assist and inform both health providers and recipients of healthcare through this project.”

The project is being funded by a $98,000 grant from the Otto Bremer Foundation. — School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

 
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Webinar focuses on Internet applicants

A webinar Tuesday, Jan. 10, “Preparing for the New Definition of an Internet Applicant,” will be hosted by the affirmative action office from 10 to 11 a.m. in 305 Twamley Hall. To register, contact University Within the University (U2), at 777-2128, or U2@mail.und.nodak.edu. There is no cost to attend.

– Phyllis Vold, affirmative action

 

Retirement reception will honor Cathy Hilley

The ITSS staff invite you to join us in honoring Cathy Hilley, who is retiring after 32 years of employment with the University. A reception will be held Tuesday, Jan. 10, at the Edna Twamley Room, Twamley Hall, from 2 to 4 p.m.

– Information technology systems and services

 

Yoga classes begin Jan. 10

Yoga classes will begin Tuesday, Jan. 10, at the Lotus Meditation Center, 2908 University Ave. Classes are held at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday evenings for beginners and mixed levels and at 5:30 p.m. Thursdays for continuing students. The classes will continue through March 9. Cost for the nine-week session is $72 and single classes are $10. For more information or to register, call Dyan Rey, instructor, at 772-8840 or e-mail dyanre@aol.com.

 

U2 lists workshops

Below are U2 workshops for Jan. 10-12. Visit our web site for more. Reserve your seat by registering with U2 by phone, 777-2128; e-mail, U2@mail.und.nodak.edu; or online, www.conted.und.edu/U2/. Please include workshop title and date, name, department, position, box number, phone number, e-mail address, and how you first learned of the workshop. Thank you for registering in advance; it helps us plan for materials and number of seats.

  • Preparing for the New Definition of an Internet Applicant: Jan. 10, 10 to 11 a.m., 305 Twamley Hall. The government has taken a firm position on how it defines an applicant for the Internet and related technologies. Federal contractors must comply with this reporting requirement by Feb. 6, and it could soon affect the way all employers report Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) data.

    • Are you ready?
    • Do you understand the changes?
    • Do you understand your new record-keeping and reporting obligations?
    Join Peopleclick for an informative webinar where our compliance experts will explain the best practices you need to put in place NOW to ensure compliance. You’ll hear about:
    • Recordkeeping requirements
    • Differences between working with internal and external candidate databases
    • What constitutes “basic qualifications”
    • What actions constitute “considering”
    • How you should handle candidate searches
    • Who can be excluded from the applicant pool

    Whether or not you use an applicant tracking system, these requirements apply. You need to prepare policies and procedures now to make sure your organization is in compliance with the OFCCP’s definition by Feb. 6.
  • Access XP, Beginning: Jan. 10, 12, and 13, 9 a.m. to noon, 361 Upson II (nine hours total). Prerequisite: Basic understanding of computers; mouse and file saving/retrieval skills. Introduces Access and relational databases. Create a database, work with tables, queries, forms, reports, and establish relationships. Presenter: Heidi Strande.
  • Records Disposal Procedures: Jan. 11, 10 to 11:30 a.m., Memorial Room, Memorial Union. Learn more about the process for destroying or transferring records that have passed their retention time limits. We’ll review the forms used, discuss why it’s necessary to document, and take part in a hands-on run-through of the entire process. It’s fun to clean out, it’s easier to do than you think, and now’s the time to do it! Presenter: Chris Austin, records manager.
  • The Power of Employee Feedback (one minute praise): Jan. 11 and 18, 10 a.m. to noon, 211 Skalicky Tech Incubator. Learn how FAST Feedback techniques can improve both the morale and retention of employees. Participants will learn how to practice MBWA and how to use positive feedback to affect the performance of their employees in the workplace. Presenter: Galen Cariveau, workforce development director.
  • Methamphetamine in our Community: Jan. 12, 3 to 4:30 p.m., River Valley Room, Memorial Union. This presentation will cover the history of meth, both in its legal and illegal uses, and how it came to be in our state and community. Information will be presented on meth labs, meth users, meth paraphernalia, the cyle of a meth user, updates on meth legislation, and information on treatment of meth addicts. Presenter: Officer Sue Shirek, Grand Forks Police Department.

— Julie Sturges, U2 program

 

Agenda listed for Jan. 12 U Senate meeting

The University Senate will meet Thursday, Jan. 12, at 4:05 p.m. in Room 7, Gamble Hall.

AGENDA

1. Announcements.
2. Minutes of the previous meeting and business arising from the minutes.
3. Question period.

CONSENT CALENDAR:

No items submitted.

BUSINESS CALENDAR:

4. Discussion to address the academic issues concerning the Indian nickname and Indian head logo controversy at UND.

— Carmen Williams (interim registrar), secretary, University Senate

 

Beauty Bites Beast author to present lecture

Mark your calendar now for “Beauty Bites Beast.” UND Women Studies (A & S 225) willl host Ellen Snortland for a lecture that is open to all students, faculty, staff and community on Thursday, Jan. 12, from 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl.

Snortland has been a broadcast and print journalist specializing in so-called women’s issues, including the movement to achieve gender balance in institutions, women in history, reducing violence against women, as well as childhood and adult sexual harassment problems being exposed in society. Besides her savvy in gender politics, Snortland is fluent in domestic and global affairs.

Snortland particularly advocates nipping sexual harassment in the bud where it actually starts, in the home and on the playground, by empowering girls and women to speak up. As a self-defense advocate, she writes and teaches both women and kids about physical self-protection skills. She completed the IMPACT Foundation’s International full-impact instructor training in August 1993. She played an instrumental role in the IMPACT self-defense classes brought to the University.

As a writer, producer, director, humorist actor, dormant lawyer, women’s and children’s self-defense advocate, and feminist homemaker, Snortland has a unique ability to speak and write with authority on subjects ranging from knitting and cooking to S.W.A.T. team methods of close-quarter, hand-to-hand combat, and the opportunities and obstacles of the professional American woman. Her perspective provides a bridge of understanding between the home, university, and office in a context of feminist theory. True to her Renaissance woman nature, she is the author of Beauty Bites Beast: Awakening the Warrior Within Women and Girls (Trilogy Books, Pasadena, 1998), recently featured on Dateline NBC.

Snortland is on the part-time faculty in the communication studies department at California State University, Los Angeles. She is also a contributing writer to Ms. Magazine. She received a law degree from Loyola Law School in 1977.

For more information, contact shelle.michaels@und.nodak.edu

 

Association for Women in Communication lists events

The UND Student Association for Women in Communication (AWC) invites you to join us for our 2006 events:
Jan. 12: Communication professor/author/actress Ellen Snortland presents, “Beauty Bites Beast,” from 9:30 to 10:45 a.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. The presentation is open to the public and is also sponsored by the women studies program and the UND Women’s Center.

  • Feb. 2-4: The Vagina Monologues, 7 p.m. at the Empire Arts Center each night, with a special addition showing at 11 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 4. AWC will work with the DIVAs (making a Difference Initiated through Various Arts) of Grand Forks/UND and will coordinate the information fair during the presentation. Tickets may be purchased at the Chester Fritz Box Office, 777-4090. (Benefit for the Community Violence Intervention Center)
  • March 2: A panel discussion on “Women in the Military:

History in the Making” is set for 7 p.m. in the Memorial Union River Valley Room. Service women from the Grand Forks Air Force Base and North Dakota National Guard will share their experiences from the current conflict in Iraq and Afghanistan. This presentation is open to the public and is being presented by AWC, the women studies program and the Women’s Center as part of the Women’s History Month observance.

Contact shelle.Michaels@und.nodak.edu for information on any of these events.

The Association for Women in Communication will hold its first 2006 meeting on Thursday, Jan. 12, at 4:30 p.m. in 103 O’Kelly Hall. Contact AWC president Anita Herold at anita.herold@und.nodak.edu for information about the organization and membership. More information is also available at www.womcom.org.

— Shelle Michaels, Association for Women in Communication

 

Nordic Initiative presents play

Nordic Initiative will present North Dakota native Ellen Snortland’s one-woman play, Now That She’s Gone, at 7 p.m. Thursday and Friday, Jan. 12 and 13, at the Empire Arts Center.

The play explores Snortland’s often wacky, irreverent and sometimes torturous relationship with her Norwegian-American mother. “Her funny and tragic, particular and universal story sends us home with a better understanding of our own,” observes Gloria Steinem.

Tickets are $10 for general admission and $8 for seniors, students and children.

– Shelle Michaels, Empire Arts Center

 

Fargo conference focuses on entrepreneurship

The Midwest Association of Seed and Venture Funds (MASVF) conference arrives at the Fargodome in Fargo for a one-day conference Tuesday, Jan. 17. The focus of the MASVF is to build new high tech, mid-tech and other high-growth companies in the Midwest. The MASVF brings together emerging ventures with seed, angel and venture capitalists.

MASVF is a 10-state network of private, public and non-profit organizations committed to investment in innovation and entrepreneurs. Fargo was selected as the host city for the 2006 conference by conference co-chairs Bruce Gjovig of the UND Center for Innovation and Matt Noah of NetSuds.com of Minneapolis. Noah is a native of Fargo and graduate of NDSU. 

The MASVF conference appeals to angel investors, venture capitalists, entrepreneurs, state-sponsored venture capital program executives, university researchers, economic development leaders, service providers, and others who help launch and grow innovative and entrepreneurial ventures. 

The conference features sessions on the processes and best practices for angel investing, avoiding the top mistakes when developing business plans, creating capital for rural innovation, and best practices in seed and venture capital investing. Keynote presenters include Jamestown natives Bart Holaday of Adam Street, Chicago, and Bill Joos of Go to Marketing of Palo Alto, Calif. Other presenters are Sue Preston of Seattle, who is entrepreneur-in-residence with the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and Brad Knox, Chief Counsel of the U.S. House Small Business Committee of Washington, D.C.  Regional speakers include Mike Jerstad and Paul Batcheller of Prairie Gold Ventures of Sioux Falls, Brian Johnson of Mincorp of St. Paul, and John Cosgriff of Invest America of Fargo. A full agenda is online at www.masvf.com.

The conference is held in conjunction with the Marketplace for Entrepreneurs conference Jan 17-18, www.marketplaceofideas.org. MASVF registration is $199 and the agenda and registration materials are at www.masvf.com.

— Bruce Gjovig, conference co-chair, Bruce@innovators.net

 

Martin Luther King Jr. awards luncheon set for Jan. 27

The Martin Luther King Jr. awards luncheon will be held at the Memorial Union Ballroom Friday, Jan. 27, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The public is invited.

Luncheon tickets are sold in advance and available at the multicultural student services office, Memorial Union information center, and the UND apartment community center. Tickets are $7 for adults and $5 for UND students; children under age 12 are free.

The theme of the 2006 luncheon is “Countdown to 2013: Be Strong, Be Unified, Be Wary.” 2013 will mark the 50th anniversary of the historic “March on Washington,” during which Dr. King presented his “I Have a Dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

During the program, nine MLK awards are presented as well as two Era Bell Thompson awards, two Rosa Parks awards, and HOPE (Helping Our People Excel) awards.

Award recipients are selected by a committee that includes students, faculty, staff, administrators, Grand Forks Air Force Base representatives, and community members. HOPE awards are given each year by members of the ALANA (Asian Latino African and Native American) student organization.

“It’s an opportunity to celebrate the greatness of Dr. King and his contributions and a chance to award those who carry out his dreams,” said M.C. Diop, director of Multicultural Student Services.

Diop encouraged all interested persons to attend the luncheon. “This is a chance for people to understand what occurred during the civil rights movement and become aware of some of the major players,” he said.

The younger generation may not be aware of the magnitude of civil rights leaders who crusaded for social justice four decades ago. “What has happened since has put that part of history on the backburner,” said Diop. “What happened in the late 70s and 80s has downplayed what happened in the 1960s.”

Diop said it’s a “misnomer” that the U.S. Civil Rights Movement only helped African Americans. “Many groups including women, economically challenged, and gays have benefited,” he said. “Civil Rights leaders showed people how to protest against many social injustices.”

Some might also be surprised to learn that Dr. King found his inspiration halfway around the world. “Dr. King studied Gandhi in India and that’s where he got a lot of his ideas,” said Diop.

Today many consider Dr. King one of the most outstanding and influential figures in U.S. history. “Dr. King is the true American hero,” Diop said. “He put his life on the line not just to help black people but all Americans.”

For more information about the 2006 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. awards luncheon, contact multicultural student services at 777-4259.

– Multicultural student services

 

Martin Luther King Jr. awards luncheon set for Jan. 27

The Martin Luther King Jr. awards luncheon will be held at the Memorial Union Ballroom Friday, Jan. 27, from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The public is invited.

Luncheon tickets are sold in advance and available at the multicultural student services office, Memorial Union information center, and the UND apartment community center. Tickets are $7 for adults and $5 for UND students; children under age 12 are free.

The theme of the 2006 luncheon is “Countdown to 2013: Be Strong, Be Unified, Be Wary.” 2013 will mark the 50th anniversary of the historic “March on Washington,” during which Dr. King presented his “I Have a Dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C.

During the program, nine MLK awards are presented as well as two Era Bell Thompson awards, two Rosa Parks awards, and HOPE (Helping Our People Excel) awards.

Award recipients are selected by a committee that includes students, faculty, staff, administrators, Grand Forks Air Force Base representatives, and community members. HOPE awards are given each year by members of the ALANA (Asian Latino African and Native American) student organization.

“It’s an opportunity to celebrate the greatness of Dr. King and his contributions and a chance to award those who carry out his dreams,” said M.C. Diop, director of Multicultural Student Services.

Diop encouraged all interested persons to attend the luncheon. “This is a chance for people to understand what occurred during the civil rights movement and become aware of some of the major players,” he said.

The younger generation may not be aware of the magnitude of civil rights leaders who crusaded for social justice four decades ago. “What has happened since has put that part of history on the backburner,” said Diop. “What happened in the late 70s and 80s has downplayed what happened in the 1960s.”

Diop said it’s a “misnomer” that the U.S. Civil Rights Movement only helped African Americans. “Many groups including women, economically challenged, and gays have benefited,” he said. “Civil Rights leaders showed people how to protest against many social injustices.”

Some might also be surprised to learn that Dr. King found his inspiration halfway around the world. “Dr. King studied Gandhi in India and that’s where he got a lot of his ideas,” said Diop.

Today many consider Dr. King one of the most outstanding and influential figures in U.S. history. “Dr. King is the true American hero,” Diop said. “He put his life on the line not just to help black people but all Americans.”

For more information about the 2006 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. awards luncheon, contact multicultural student services at 777-4259.

– Multicultural student services


 

Talk focuses on women in the military

As part of Women’s History Month, female soldiers from the North Dakota Army National Guard and the Grand Forks Air Force Base will discuss their roles in the current conflict. “Women in the Military; History in the Making,” will be held Thursday, March 2, at 7 p.m. in the Memorial Union River Valley Room. Everyone is welcome.

The talk is sponsored by women studies, Women’s Center and UND Student Association for Women in Communication.

 

Toby Keith will play Ralph

Toby Keith’s Big Throwdown Tour II with special guest Joe Nichols and Scott Emerick will be at the Ralph Engelstad Arena Friday, Feb. 10, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets go on sale Saturday, Jan. 7, at 10 a.m. Tickets are available at the REA box office, all Ticketmaster locations, at (701) 772-5151, or online at ticketmaster.com.

– Sommer Lockhart, marketing director, Ralph Engelstad Arena

 

Career fair set for Feb. 28

Career services will host the annual spring career fair Tuesday, Feb. 28, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Hyslop Multipurpose Gym.

– Beth Blessum, event coordinator, career services

 

Graduate school sets scholarly forum for Feb. 28-March 2

The graduate school will present its campus-wide scholarly forum Feb. 28 to March 2. Richard Flagen, professor of chemical engineering and environmental engineering at California Institute of Technology, will give a keynote address on Wednesday, March 1, at 3:30 p.m. He will be hosted by the Department of Chemical Engineering. The presentation will be in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl.

Presentations, exhibits, and/or performances from the campus community are encouraged. For submission forms and guidelines, go to www.graduateschool.und.edu and look under “Upcoming Events.”

Please contact the Graduate School at 777-2786 if you have any questions regarding the forum.

– Graduate School

 

Alumni Days schedule listed

A partial schedule for Alumni Days follows.

  • Wednesday, May 24: 2 to 4 p.m., High Tea, North Dakota Museum of Art, UND campus; 6 p.m., Welcome home social, dinner and dance, A Touch of Magic, East Grand Forks.
  • Thursday, May 25: 5:30 p.m., Sioux Award Banquet, Alerus Center, Grand Forks.
  • Friday, May 26: 10 a.m., President’s Brunch, President Charles and Adele Kupchella’s home.

— Stacey Majkrzak, external and medial relations coordinator, Alumni Association and Foundation

 
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Library lists spring hours

Beginning Monday, Jan. 9, the Chester Fritz Library will observe the following hours of operation for spring semester: Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m. to midnight; Friday, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m. to midnight.

– Karen Cloud, Chester Fritz Library

 

Martin Luther King Jr. holiday observed

In accordance with State Board of Higher Education directives, Monday, Jan. 16, will be observed as Martin Luther King Jr. Day by faculty and staff members of the University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be required to work on this holiday.

– Greg Weisenstein, vice president for academic affairs and provost, and Diane Nelson, director, human resources

 

Chester Fritz Library holiday hours listed

Hours of operation for the Chester Fritz Library over the Martin Luther King Jr. weekend are: Saturday, Jan. 14, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, Jan. 15, closed; Monday, Jan. 16 (Martin Luther King Jr. Day), 1 p.m. to midnight.

– Karen Cloud, Chester Fritz Library

 

Diane Hadden named summer sessions director

Diane Hadden has been appointed director of summer sessions. This is a half-time, 12-month position. Hadden has extensive UND experience, having served in the graduate school from 1985 to 1998 and as director of advising and admissions in the dean’s office of the College of Education and Human Development from 1998 to 1999. She was employed from 1999 to 2005 by the Barnes & Noble University Bookstore as assistant store manager/textbook manager. As director of summer sessions, she will administer all for-credit summer courses and activities and provide leadership in the development and implementation of summer programming.

– Greg Weisenstein, provost

 

Nominations sought for Kupchella award

Nominations are sought for the first Charles E. Kupchella Preventive Medicine and Wellness Award.

The award has been created to recognize the achievements of individuals and organizations who have worked to improve health and wellness through lowered rates of disease and disability by developing and delivering effective health promotion and prevention initiatives.

Named for the president of UND, the Kupchella Wellness Award will be presented next May during the medical school’s M.D. Class of ‘06 commencement awards brunch.

UND is seeking nominations of individuals and organizations in North Dakota and surrounding states who have contributed significantly to disease prevention and healthful living. Consideration will be given to those who have:

  • made significant contributions in the field of health promotion and disease prevention, including the clinical, education and research areas
  • demonstrated excellence in a function or on a project related to prevention or health promotion
  • taken initiative, shown innovativeness, persistence, has an impact and/or made a difference in prevention/health promotion to rural Americans

Projects may address one or more of the goals and focus areas outlined in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services “Healthy People 2010: Understanding and Improving Health” and “Steps to a Healthier US.” See http://www.health.gov/healthypeople or http://www.healthierus.gov/ or call 800-367-4725 for more information. Areas of special interest are:

  • Promotion of physical activity
  • Reduction of overweight or obesity
  • Reduction or elimination of tobacco use
  • Reduction or elimination of substance abuse
  • Promotion of responsible sexual behavior
  • Reduction or elimination of injury and violence

The nomination should briefly address the following:

  • Why should this individual (or organization) be considered for this award?
  • What are the key outcomes and achievements of the program, policy, contribution or initiative?
  • Describe the nominee’s accomplishments; attach CV (up to three letters of support may be included).
    Emphasis will be given to programs that demonstrate creativity and innovation, leadership, sustainability, replicability and effectiveness.

The nomination letter and supporting materials are due by 5 p.m. Wednesday, March 1, in the Office of the Dean, UND School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 501 N. Columbia Road, Grand Forks, ND 58202-9037.

The award recipient will receive a $1,000 cash award and a commemorative plate. A plaque, featuring a picture of the recipient and accomplishments, will be displayed in the new $20 million Student Wellness Center, now under construction near the Ralph Engelstad Arena. The center is scheduled to open next summer.

The award has been made possible by a gift from Manuchair Ebadi, associate vice president for health affairs and medical research and associate dean for research and program development at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences to the UND Foundation.

For more information, contact public affairs at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, 777-4305.

— School of Medicine and Health Sciences

 

Nominations sought for outstanding faculty academic adviser

The academic advising committee is now accepting nominations for the Outstanding Faculty Academic Adviser Award to be presented at Founders Day 2006. To access the nomination form online, go to http://sas.und.edu/forms/nomination.php.

Paper nomination forms are available at the following locations: Union info Center, student academic services, undergraduate departments, and deans’ offices. All students, faculty, staff, and alumni are eligible to nominate an undergraduate faculty academic adviser for this award. Nominations will be accepted through Jan. 13.
For more information, please contact student academic services, 201 Memorial Union, 777-2117.

– Lisa Burger, director, student academic services, on behalf of the academic advising committee

 

Applications sought for honors director

The University invites applications for director of the undergraduate honors program. The director will provide leadership in coordinating all honors initiatives across campus, teach courses in the honors program, and report directly to the vice president for academic affairs and provost.

Administrative responsibilities include: recruit, retain, and advise students, develop curriculum in coordination with academic departments, administer the program budget, appoint and supervise instructional and office staff, foster the development of an active learning community within the honors program including on the honors residence hall wings, coordinate undergraduate honors research and senior honors thesis programs, and coordinate annual program review, assessment of student learning, and strategic planning.

Desired qualifications: earned doctorate or terminal professional degree, teaching experience in a four-year college or university, record of creative scholarship, excellent oral and written communication skills, strong commitment to interdisciplinary undergraduate education, ability to work with diverse faculty, staff, students, and administrators, excellent organizational skills, demonstrated team leadership, experience in teaching honors courses, and/or in directing an honors program or a program for highly motivated students is preferred, record of academic administrative and leadership experience in a college or university, and knowledge of current pedagogical trends in undergraduate and honors education.

Interested candidates should submit a letter of application, curriculum vita, and contact information for at least three references to: Ellen Erickson, assistant provost, University of North Dakota, PO Box 8176, Grand Forks, ND 58202-8176. To apply electronically, submit to ellenerickson@mail.und.edu. Review of applications will begin Jan. 15 and continue until the position is filled.

UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

– Vice president for academic affairs and provost

 

Travel grant application deadline is Jan. 17

The third deadline for submission of applications for travel funds is Tuesday, Jan. 17. Travel applications will be considered at that time only for travel that will occur between Jan. 18, 2006, and May 1, 2006. No other applications will be considered.

The fourth deadline for submission of applications to the Senate Scholarly Activities Committee (SSAC) is Wednesday, Feb. 15. Research/creative activity and publication grant applications as well as applications for new faculty scholar awards will be considered, but no travel applications will be considered.

The fifth deadline for submission of applications is Monday, May 1. Travel applications will be considered at that time only for travel that will occur between May 2, 2006, and Sept. 15, 2006. No other applications will be considered.
The committee reminds applicants to carefully prepare their proposals and be specific and realistic in their budget requests. The proposal should be written with a multidisciplinary readership in mind. Avoid technical jargon and undefined abbreviations. Although the SSAC encourages submission of research/creative activity proposals and travel/publication requests, the Committee takes into consideration the most recent SSAC award granted to each applicant. Priority will be given to beginning faculty and first-time applicants. Requests for research/creative activity awards may not exceed $2,500.

Application forms are available at RD&C, 105 Twamley Hall, 777-4278, or on research development and compliance home page (on UND’s home page under “Research”). A properly signed original and 11 copies of the application must be submitted to RD&C on or prior to the deadline. Applications that are not prepared in accordance with the directions on the forms will not be considered by the committee. Please feel free to contact any of the current SSAC committee members for information or guidance when preparing your application. Their names, telephone numbers, and e-mail addresses are available on RD&C’s home page or by calling RD&C at 777-4278.

- Sandra Short (physical education and exercise science), chair, Senate scholarly activities committee

 

New faculty scholar awards provide research support

Senate Scholarly Activities Committee (SSAC) new faculty scholar awards provide extra support for initiation of research and creative activity programs of assistant professors who have been at UND three years or less (e.g., date of appointment at UND should be January 2003 or later). The SSAC anticipates that many new faculty scholar awards will lead to the development of projects that will ultimately be funded by external agencies. Up to three awards of $5,000 each will be made per year. Only outstanding applications will be funded. One competition is held for faculty scholar awards each year.

Wednesday, Feb. 15, is the deadline for submission of new faculty scholar award applications to the SSAC. The committee will consider requests from faculty members to conduct pure and applied research, support writing projects, or to support other creative and scholarly endeavors (e.g., performances, art projects, compositions). All costs normally incurred in the conduct of the research or creative activity are eligible budget items. Travel costs which are essential to the conduct of the project may be requested; however, travel to present papers or attend conferences is not allowable under this program.

The committee reminds applicants to carefully prepare their proposals and be specific and realistic in their budget requests. All applications must include the completed application form, letter of support from the departmental chair, the applicant’s resume, and a description of the project. The properly signed original application and 11 copies must be submitted to Research Development and Compliance (RD&C) prior to the published deadline. The application form is available at RD&C (105 Twamley Hall or call 777-4278) and on RD&C’s home page (found under “Research” on UND’s home page).

— Sandra Short (physical education and exercise science), chair, Senate Scholarly Activities Committee

 

Tuition bill info provided

The following tuition bill information was sent to students.

Thank you for your patience as we transition from paper statements to electronic access via Campus Connection.
Spring tuition/fees are now reflected on student accounts. You can view your account summary and total due charges on Campus Connection. Campus Connection is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Important dates:

  • Jan. 1 — processing of spring tuition waivers and third party contracts will begin.
  • Jan. 10 — payments sent through the mail must be received by Jan. 10. Please allow sufficient time for mailing. Send your payments to: UND Business Office, PO Box 8373, Grand Forks, ND 58202.
  • Jan. 19-20 — Spring fee payment and financial aid check disbursement will be held at the Memorial Union Ballroom.
  • Jan. 20 — spring tuition/fees must be paid in full or deferred by the business office by Jan. 20 or a $200 late payment penalty will be assessed.
  • Jan. 27 — If spring tuition/fees are not paid or deferred by the business office by Jan. 27, your spring registration will be canceled and you will not be permitted to re-register for the spring semester.
    • Payments can be made:
      • s At the business office teller windows, second floor, Twamley Hall.
      • s At fee payment, Memorial Union Ballroom, Jan. 19 and 20.
      • s By mail (see address above).
      • s By phone, call (701) 777-3080 with credit card payments.
    • Please note:
      • s Spring tuition waivers and third party contracts will be reflected on your account between Jan. 1 and Jan. 17.
      • s If your spring financial aid will be delayed, please request a deferment of your tuition payment through the business office. Deferment forms are available at the business office or can be found online at www.und.edu/dept/busof

Students with accounts that have been delinquent for 60 days will not be able to register for the spring semester nor receive an official academic transcript until the balances are paid in full.

Account summary information can be provided only to students unless prior authorization has been given, allowing UND to release information to an outside party, such as a parent or guardian, pursuant to FERPA regulations.
If you have questions concerning your account detail, please call the business office at (701) 777-3911 or e-mail BusinessOffice@mail.und.edu. If you have questions concerning financial aid, please call the student financial aid office at 777-3121 or e-mail SFA@mail.und.nodak.edu.

— Business office

 

Mini-grants available for summer courses, programs

Are you planning an event at UND this summer but lack funding? Do you plan to develop a new summer course but need financial resources? Consider applying for a mini-grant through the newly formed Summer Programs and

Events Council (SPEC). SPEC’s start-up mini-grant program will fund deserving proposals for:

  • Expansion of existing 2006 credit or non-credit summer programs/courses
  • Development of new 2006 credit or non-credit summer programs/courses.

The mini-grant funds will help cover the development, marketing and start-up costs for programs and courses held at UND during the summer. Examples include camps for kids, academic classes that can be completed in the summer months, or any special event designed for the community. Quality, creativity and “out of the box” ideas are encouraged.

All interested faculty and staff are encouraged to submit proposals; the application can be found at www.conted.und.edu/summer/grant/. Application deadline is 4:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 6. Recipients will be announced Feb. 21.

The mission of the Summer Programs and Events Council is to promote all summer events, programs, and courses to the greater Grand Forks community while providing leadership and logistical support for summer programming on the UND campus.

For more information on the mini-grant program contact Diane Hadden, director of summer sessions (credit activities), 777-6284, ; or Kerry Kerber, associate dean of continuing education (non-credit activities), 777-4264, kerrykerber@mail.und.nodak.edu.

— Julie Bean, summer events coordinator

 

Info provided on car rental insurance

North Dakota’s risk management provides all the insurance required by rental agencies for most areas. If you rent a vehicle for University use in a foreign country (including Canada and Mexico) or in Florida, Alaska, Hawaii, or California, the additional liability and collision/comprehension insurance provided by the rental agency must be purchased. This is due to the difficulty and high costs associated with defending claims in these locations. In states other than those listed, do not take the insurance coverage provided by the car rental agency. The coverage will be provided by risk management.

– Carl Iseminger, accounting services

 

Employees may enroll in courses at low cost

For just $10.95 per credit hour, benefited employees may enroll in University classes. You may take up to three academic courses each calendar year, and may be granted work release time for one academic class per school session after receiving approval from your supervisor for release time during working hours. You can continue your education, earn a degree, or improve your skills. Staff members may work toward a degree; faculty may take courses for credit. Both faculty and staff members may audit courses. New employees may also take a course while on probation.

You can choose from hundreds of courses, ranging from management and sciences to languages and music, from exercise and ceramics to first aid and financial management. Here’s how to enroll:

  1. Pick up admission materials, registration materials and a tuition waiver form at admissions, 205 Twamley Hall (777-3821) or at the graduate school, 414 Twamley Hall (777-2784).
  2. Choose the course you’d like to take. Prerequisites or other factors may affect registration.
  3. Fill out the forms and have your supervisor/dean sign the tuition waiver forms. Return them to admissions (undergraduates) or the graduate school. Return the completed waiver forms to admissions. The deadline for filing the waiver is Friday, Jan. 6.
  4. Register according to instructions in the Time Schedule of Classes.

If you are enrolling for the first time, you need to complete and return an “Application for Admission” form, available from the admissions office or graduate school. There is a $25 matriculation fee for an employee who has not previously enrolled. You may need to file transcripts from schools that you previously attended. Please note that some courses have additional fees that cannot be waived.

Take advantage of your $1,000 benefit.

– Heidi Kippenhan,m director of admissions, and Diane Nelson, director of human resources

 

Expect W2 forms at end of January

W2 forms will be mailed to employees the last week of January. A tax update cannot be loaded into PeopleSoft until the middle of January which is required for printing W2 forms. They will be printed and mailed as soon as possible after that upload. Please do not call the payroll office to request your tax data early; we will not be able to respond to individual requests during this busy time of year.

– Pat Hanson, director of payroll

 

Volunteers sought for nutrition/memory study

In collaboration with James Penland of the Grand Forks USDA Human Nutrition Research Center and Patricia Moulton of the UND Center for Rural Health, we are recruiting younger adults, age 21 to 35, and older adults, age 60 to 80, to participate in a study of the effects of nutritional status on age differences in memory performance. The study takes about three hours to complete. The testing will occur at the Human Nutrition Research Center in Grand Forks. You will be paid $25 for your participation.

Your scores will be completely confidential and will not be associated with your name; you will be given a subject number and your name will not be used. Participation will be limited to those without any previous history of a stroke, multiple sclerosis, or Parkinson’s disease. If you are interested in scheduling a time to participate or in finding out more about the study, please call Brian VanFossen at 777-9925.

– Tom Petros, professor of psychology

 

Adult volunteers sought for pesticide study

Adult volunteers are sought for a study on “Occupation Type, Pesticide Exposure, and Neuropsychological Function: The Case for Agricultural Workers,” by Ric Ferraro, psychology.

Purpose: To examine if some occupations (farmers vs. non-farmers) are more risky than others and how pesticide exposure possibly contributes to this increased risk. Farm-related occupations are commonly exposed to various pesticides, yet little is known how this exposure impacts neuropsychological (i.e., thinking, problem-solving, decision-making, memory) performance. This performance may be worse in those who are at a higher risk for pesticide exposure. Also, the aging process may increase as a result of this exposure risk. Thus, participants across a wide age range (35 to 74 years of age) will be tested.

Participants: Farmers will be defined as those with a documented history of an occupation that involves chronic pesticide exposure (e.g., farmer, farm worker, agricultural/livestock/grain farmer, aerial pesticide applicator). Members of this group will also have performed farm or farm-related work for one week in the previous month. Chronic pesticide exposure will be defined as three consecutive workdays and exposure cannot be the result of accidents, safety violations, or weather. Non-farmers will be defined as those who have never performed farm work and have an occupation that is not related to farming (e.g., nurse, secretary, school teacher). A total of 25 to 30 farmers and 25 to 30 non-farmers are needed for this initial study and all must be between the ages of 35 to 74, have normal or corrected-to-normal vision and must also be able to transport themselves to the psychology building, Corwin-Larimore Hall. Each participant will receive $50 for their time and effort and the entire experiment will last approximately one hour. Each participate will receive a random subject number and all analyses will be at a group level rather than at the individual level as a way to increase confidentiality.

Testing: Participants will read and sign a consent form, followed by a series of paper and pencil tests of neuropsychological functioning (background questionnaire, mood scale, anxiety scale, vocabulary test, mini-mental status examination, digit symbol, Boston naming test, and immediate/delayed logical memory). Participants will also fill out a pesticide exposure questionnaire and will be required to supply a urine sample. With the assistance of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), Atlanta, Ga., the urine sample will be analyzed for metabolites of herbicides (including 2, 4 D), organophosphorus pesticides (including chlorpyrifos), and the pyrethroid insecticides, and will also pick up the most commonly used agricultural pesticides.

Importance: The paper and pencil data will be correlated with the pesticide exposure and urine data to see if, as mentioned earlier, occupations that result in pesticide exposure are related to worse neuropsychological test performance and if this exposure results in what could be termed premature aging. The farm and non-farm groups will be compared using statistical analysis.

To volunteer, contact me. – Ric Ferraro, psychology, (701) 777-2414; f_ferraro@und.edu.

 

Volunteers sought for breast health study

We are recruiting women who are interested in participating in a study to develop methods to detect breast cancer early.

The purpose of the study is to identify normal and tumor specific proteins of breast fluid obtained from nipple aspiration that may be useful in the future to detect early breast cancer. The study is recruiting women, 35 years or older, who have no known breast disease. The study is also recruiting women, 35 years or older who have been diagnosed with breast cancer or a lump that may be breast cancer, or had mammography that is suggestive of breast cancer.

Women must be able to read and understand English, not have been pregnant for at least two years, not planning a pregnancy, and who have not breastfed for two years. To participate, either with or without a breast cancer diagnosis, women must be otherwise healthy. The study requires one to two clinic visits in Grand Forks. Parking or taxi/bus voucher provided. On completion of the study, a $50 payment will be mailed.

Further information can be obtained by calling the nurse investigators at the UND College of Nursing: Chandice Covington at 777-4553 or Sun-Mi Chae at 777-4323.

– Nursing

 

Children’s Center offers full-time child care

The University Children’s Center, which is located on campus at 525 Stanford Road, offers child care for children ages 2-5. Children are cared for in small groups by teachers with degrees in early childhood education or a related field. A day at the University Children’s Center includes a USDA approved breakfast, lunch, snack, a choice of rest or nap time, planned large and small group activities, and opportunities to play outdoors. Parents are always welcome to join their children for part of the day.

Student Rates Pre-School Toddler

  • Full Day $24 $27
  • Half Day $18 $22
  • Head Start Children arriving
  • at UCC at 11:30 a.m. $20

Faculty, Staff and Greater Grand Forks Community Rates Pre-School Toddler

  • Full Day $25 $28
  • Half Day $19 $23
  • Head Start Children arriving at UCC at 11:30 a.m. $21
  • Academic year registration fee $30
  • Summer registration fee $20
  • The University Apartment Resident (UAR) discount of $2 per day or half-day still applies.
  • For additional care (hourly rate) $4

For additional information, please call 777-3947. You may also visit the UCC web site at www.childrenscenter.und.edu.

— JoAnne Yearwood, director, University Children’s Center

 

Season golf pass available through payroll deduction

Play golf at Ray Richards in 2006 at the 2005 rate. This rate offer is available to faculty and staff that sign up for a season pass on payroll deduction. The payroll deduction will occur over six pay periods in January, February, and March. The amount of the season pass will be deducted over six pay periods in equal installments beginning January 15. The season pass will be available to you when the golf course opens in April. The amount deducted per pay period is $40.03 for a total of $240.18 (includes tax). This offer also applies to a faculty/staff family season pass. The amount per pay period will be $77.39 for a total of $464.34 (includes tax). The completed application must be returned by Jan. 4.

Call 777-3788 or e-mail wally.bloom@mail.und.edu for an application and questions. I will either send or fax you an application.

– Wally Bloom, Ray Richards golf course.

 

Staff Senate raffle winners named

Recent winners of the “31 Days of Glory” Staff Senate raffle are: Dec. 14, Kirsten Carolin (resident services); Dec. 15, Linda Maszk (Memorial Union); Dec. 16, Tod Gohl (facilities); Dec. 17, Jason Uhlir (campus safety and security/risk management); Dec. 18, Paul Erickson (off campus, $500); Dec. 19, Dawn Drake (medical school); Dec. 20, Kay Williams (Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center); Dec. 21, Debra Wilson (RAIN program); Dec. 22, Sharon Bruggeman (housing); Dec. 23, Earl Battle (EERC); Dec. 24, Terri Machart (student outreach services); Dec. 25, Harriet Powers (College of Education and Human Development, $500); Dec. 26, Cathy Perry (pathology); Dec. 27, Carilynn Maw (credit union); Dec. 28, Janie Braaten (off campus); Dec. 29, Debra Wilson (nursing); Dec. 30, Jim Jerombeck (facilities); Dec. 31, Gerry Groenewold (EERC).

 
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Remembering Frances Eissinger

Frances M. Eissinger, retired baker, dining services, died Dec. 1, 2005, at Valley Eldercare, Grand Forks, after a long illness. She was 83.

She was born May 11, 1922, in East Grand Forks, Minn., to Isaac and Anna (Lealos) Benson. She attended Sacred Heart Grade School, and then graduated from east Grand Forks Central High School in 1941. The family moved to the Seattle, Wash., area during the war years, where she worked in a defense plant.

She married Leonard L. (Jack) Coulter in 1943 and moved back to East Grand Forks. She worked at Bates Piggly Wiggly and R.B. Griffith’s for several years. She then learned the bakery business while working with Bill Black at Black’s Bakeries and Sweet Shop. When Black’s sold she began working at UND, and headed up the new bakery they were then starting. She was well known for her “skills of the trade” at baking and decorating specialty cakes for birthdays and other events at UND. She was a culinary artist at her trade with cakes, fried cinnamon rolls, decorated cupcakes, etc. She retired from UND in May 1984.

Having no children of her own, she was devoted to her many nieces and nephews and family. She knit many pairs of mittens, made pajamas, dresses, overalls, plus many birthday cakes for all the little ones.

She was very active with the guild at Sacred Heart Catholic Church in East Grand Forks, baking cookies, cakes, pies, casseroles, various foods and cleaning the church.

Her husband died in December 1978. On May 17, 1988, she married Lyle G. Eissinger at Sacred Heart Catholic Church. She was a life member of the VFW Auxiliary Post 3817 where her father, mother, and sisters Mary Murray and Ann Ringstad were charter members.

She is survived by her husband Lyle, his granddaughter, and many nieces and nephews.
She was preceded in death by her parents, sisters Mary Murray, Crookston, Minn.; Ann Jane Ringstad, East Grand Forks; brothers John, East Grand Forks; Charles, East Grand Forks; nephews: T.J. Benson of International Falls, Minn.; and Robbie Benson, East Grand Forks; and Lyle’s daughter, Susan Hamm of Fargo, N.D.

— Jan Orvik, editor, with information from the Grand Forks Herald

 

Remembering Virginia (Ginny) Ballintine

Virginia Anne (Ginny) Ballintine, retired medical laboratory technician, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center, died Dec. 9, 2005, after a three-year struggle against cancer. She was 59.

She was born Oct. 4, 1946, in Cleveland, Ohio. In December 1946 she was adopted by James R. and Alice (Dally) Thomas of Bay Village, Ohio, becoming Virginia Anne Thomas. She graduated from Bay Village High School in 1964 and enrolled at Capital University in Columbus. She married Tom Ballintine in 1965 in Bay Village, moved to Carbondale, Ill., in 1968, and then came to Grand Forks in August 1973, where they have resided since. He serves as associate professor of chemistry. In 1974 she began a 28-year association with the University working at the Rehab Hospital, Project Lignite, Project Reclamation, and for the last 23 years of her career as a laboratory technician at the Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center. She retired in September 2002.

During her years as a UND employee she also returned to college study and completed her long-deferred bachelor’s degree, graduating with honors in the spring of 1998. She and her husband have been members of Ascension Lutheran Church, Emerado, since 1979, where she served as the pianist/organist for many years. She was active as a volunteer during the early years of the establishment of the Community Violence Intervention Center program in Grand Forks and was a member of the Grand Forks ACBL club where she earned her Life Master ranking in 2004.
She is survived by her husband, Tom, Emerado; daughter Cyndi Twing, Myrtle Beach, S.C.; son Steven, Minnewaukan, N.D.; and two grandchildren.

She was preceded in death by her parents.

— Jan Orvik, editor, with information from the Grand Forks Herald

 

Remembering Donna Hendrickson

Donna M. Hendrickson, custodial supervisor, plant services, died Dec. 11, 2005, in Altru Hospital. She was 72.
She was born Jan. 20, 1933, in Grand Forks, to Hans and Dorothy (Olson) Larson. She was raised and educated in Grand Forks. She married Norman Hendrickson in 1951. They worked together as farm laborers in the Manvel, N.D., area where they lived. Later she worked as a cook for Bushaw’s, Jacoby’s and Gordy’s Restaurants before going to work at UND. She retired in 1995. Her husband died in 1987.

She was an excellent cook and baker and loved going to the lake with her husband. She also enjoyed playing Bingo and cards with her friends.

She is survived by her daughters, Sandy (Todd) Barclay, Glendale, Ariz.; Sheila (Jeffrey) Massie, Grand Forks; and Karen Hendrickson, Fargo; five grandchildren and two great grandchildren; and a brother, Duane Larson, Grand Forks; sisters, Clara Carter, Grand Forks; Julia Everhart, Columbia, Mo.; Gladys Kopf, Seattle, Wash.; and Phyllis (Donald) Trump, Seattle, Wash.

Her parents and one son, Kenneth, preceded her in death.

— Jan Orvik, editor, with information from the Grand Forks Herald

 

Remembering Clara Pederson

Clara A. Pederson, professor emerita, Center for Teaching and Learning, died Dec. 12, 2005, in Valley Memorial Homes, 4000 Valley Square-Woodside Village. She was 89.

She was born Nov. 28, 1916, to Edward and Ella (Ellingson) Pederson at Holmes City, Minn. She attended school at Holmes City, Alexandria, Red, Wing, St. Cloud State University, and Greeley, Colo.

She began teaching in one-room rural schools in Minnesota, and for 24 years, was a member of the faculty at UND.

She retired in 1982 as professor emerita, but continued to work part-time on the University’s follow-through program in education until 1987. In 1981 she received the Fellows Award for Excellence in Public Service from UND and in 1997 she was presented an Honorary Doctor of Humanities Degree from UND. She had the opportunity to serve as a consultant to teachers at the University of Alaska, and at schools in Honduras, the Dominican Republic, and Port au Prince, Haiti. She also presented many educational workshops throughout the U.S.

Pederson was active in several organizations, including Lutheran Social Services, Christus Rex, Retired Teachers, and other educational organizations. She was a member of St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, and formerly a member of University Lutheran Church where she served on the council and as president of the congregation.

She is survived by a sister, Marie Pederson, Grand Forks, and several cousins.

— Jan Orvik, editor, with information from the Grand Forks

 

Remembering Alexander Czpiewski

Alexander Czpiewski, retired custodial supervisor, facilities, died Dec. 26, in Good Samaritan Center, Larimore, N.D.
He was 94.

He was born Feb. 13, 1911, to Alozi and Stella (Riske) in Pulaski Township, Walsh County, N.D. His family farmed near Warsaw, N.D., and he attended area rural schools. He married Dorothy B. Stoltman Oct. 24, 1935, in St. Stanislaus Catholic Church, Warsaw. In 1946 they moved to Oslo, Minn., where they owned and operated Chips Café until 1956. They then moved to Grand Forks where he worked as a custodial supervisor for the University from 1961 until his retirement in 1975. His wife preceded him in death in 2002.

He was a member of the Aerie No. 350 of the Fraternal Order of Eagles, East Grand Forks, and a lifelong member of St. Michael’s Knights of Columbus Council 1260, Grand Forks.

Czpiewski was preceded in death by his wife, Dorothy, his parents, a sister Helen; brothers, Florian, Hilary, Ernest and Leon.

He is survived by daughters Mary Ann (Roger) Enge, Grand Forks, and Rita (Tom) Welch, Minneapolis; five grandchildren, nine great grandchildren, a sister Adeline (John) Nagle, Grand Forks; and a brother, Harry (Margaret), West Oslo, N.D.

— Jan Orvik, editor, with information from the Grand Forks Herald

 
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University Relations
University of North Dakota
411 Twamley Hall
Box 7144
Grand Forks, ND 58202
Tel: (701) 777-2731
Fax: (701) 777-4616
Email: university_relations@und.edu