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ISSUE: Volume 41, Number 24: February 20, 2004
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Top STories
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Founders Day award winners, honorees named
Reminder to complete harassment training program
Three provost candidates will visit campus
Nominations sought for Chester Fritz Distinguished Professors
Faculty, researchers sought for UND experts directory
 
events to note
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Applicants sought for Remele Fellowships
Forums will focus on “The American Indian Experience”
Associate VP-research candidate visits campus
Graduate committee meets Monday
Robinson lecture is Feb. 24
Campus Ministry series addresses tolerance
NASA astronauts, one an alum, visit campus
Noted researcher to speak at geography forum
Leadership workshops held through March 3
Memorial service planned for Walter Ellis
Fulbright scholar will discuss intercultural communication
Communication sciences hosts colloquium
LEEPS lecture set for Feb. 27
Doctoral examination set for Lori Listug-Lunde
PRSSA presents benefit performance
Museum opens “Snow Country Prison” Feb. 29
English chorale music spotlighted Feb. 29
Panel, presentations highlight scholarly forum
Golf seminar scheduled for March 5-6
Public meeting will address storm water prevention plans
 
announcements
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Campus walking trail maps available
Midterm student feedback process offered for faculty
Study Abroad staff available for classroom presentation
Michelle Meyer hired as grants officer
Nelson named associate director of administration and finance at medical school
Comments sought on equal opportunity/affirmative action statement
Annual staff performance evaluations due March 1
Please announce “Getting Started” positions to students
EERC technology improves power plant efficiency
UND medical students learn basics of family medicine
EERC selected for EPA coal combustion products partnership
Members sought for wellness task groups
ConnectND corner
Please complete energy survey
Myers Gallery exhibits art from permanent collection
Presenters invited for family connections conference
Studio One features Lego tournament, proposed anti-bullying legislation
Donations sought for overseas troops
Denim Day is last Wednesday of month
 
GRANTS & RESEARCH
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Funding opportunities will not run in University Letter
December grant awardees listed
Scholarly activities committee awards travel grants
Research, grant opportunities listed
 
TOP STORIES
 

Founders Day award winners, honorees named

The 2004 Founders Day banquet will be held Thursday, Feb. 26, in the Memorial Union Ballroom. The social begins at 5:45 p.m., with the banquet at 6:30 p.m. Tickets must be paid for and picked up at the vice president for student and outreach services office in 307 Twamley Hall by noon Monday, Feb. 23. Cost is $12.50.
The highlight of the annual Founders Day banquet will be the faculty and department awards for excellence in teaching, research and service.

Seven faculty and three departments will be honored with awards:

Roxanne Vaughan, associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology, UND Foundation / McDermott Award for Excellence in Teaching, Research or Creative Activity, and Service.

David Pierce, associate professor of chemistry, UND Foundation / Lydia and Arthur Saiki Prize for Individual Excellence in Teaching.

Mary Haslerud Opp, instructor, communication, UND Foundation / Bertin C. Gamble Award for Individual Excellence in Teaching.

Kara Wettersten, assistant professor of counseling, UND Foundation / Lydia and Arthur Saiki Prize for Graduate or Professional Teaching Excellence.

Melinda Leach, associate professor of anthropology and department chair, UND Foundation / Thomas J. Clifford Faculty Achievement Award for Outstanding Faculty Development and Service.

Manuchair (Mike) Ebadi, UND Foundation / Thomas J. Clifford Faculty Achievement Award for Excellence in Research.

Audrey Glick, UND Foundation / Bertin C. Gamble Faculty Award for Excellence in Academic Advising.

Department of Theatre Arts, UND Foundation / McDermott Award for Departmental Excellence in Teaching.

Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Fellows of the University Award for Departmental Excellence in Service.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Fellows of the University Award for Departmental Excellence in Research.

Retired and retiring faculty and staff will also be honored. They are:

Carol Berg, assistant professor of family and community nursing; Mohammad Hemmasi, professor of geography and peace studies; Doris Hustad, metabolic technician, Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center (GFHNRC); Madelin Johnson, building services technician, facilities; Margaret Kiel, food service worker, dining services; Harold Lee, maintenance and project coordinator, facilities; Donald Lemon, Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor of educational leadership; John McCormack, associate professor of anatomy and cell biology, and director of graduate training; Jay Meek, professor of English; Martha Meek, associate professor of English and director of composition; Donald Moen, associate professor of mechanical engineering and department chair; Eleanor Otto, administrative secretary, department of anthropology.

Those to be honored for 25 years of service to UND are:

David Abbott, associate professor of neuroscience and director of the psychiatric residency program; Sandra Ahonen, administrative assistant, department of neuroscience; Evelyn Albrecht, storekeeper, central receiving; JoAnn Albrecht, buyer, purchasing office; Charles Blair, systems mechanic, facilities; Michael Blake, associate professor of music; Robert Boyd, vice president for student and outreach services; Alice Brekke, director of budget and assistant to the president; A. Marvin Cooley, associate professor of pathology; Randy Eken, associate dean for administration and finance, School of Medicine and Health Sciences (SMHS); Joan Erickson, cataloging and database management manager, acquisitions/bibliographic control, Chester Fritz Library; Albert Fivizzani, Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor of biology; Galen Gasink, systems mechanic, facilities; Linda Giedd, food service supervisor, dining services; Lucretia Grudem, staff nurse, family practice center, Minot; Madonna Hajicek, administrative assistant, academic affairs and education, SMHS; Linda Haldeman, head cook, Wilkerson dining center, dining services; Larry Halvorson, associate professor of family medicine and program director, Grand Forks Family Practice Center; Barbara Hobart, account technician, accounting services; Bonita Hoverson, chief research dietitian, GFHNRC; LaVonne Johnson, administrative officer, office of the dean, SMHS; Shelly Kain, project monitor, facilities; Vernon Kary, carpenter, facilities; Barbara Kjemhus, building services manager, facilities; Ellen Kotrba, technical support, Online Dakota Information Network (ODIN); Ronald Kulas, chemist, Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC); Marsha Larson, executive building services manager, facilities; Roy Lillfors, programmer analyst, information technology systems and services; Claudia Lund, phototypesetter, printing center; John Martsolf, professor of pediatrics and director of medical genetics, SMHS; Mary Beth McGurran, administrative secretary, pathology; Mary Metcalf, transportation manager, transportation; Thomas Mohr, professor of physical therapy and department chair; Kathleen Monley, information processing coordinator, administration and finance, SMHS; Tara Nelson, administrative assistant, enrollment services; William Olmstead, photolithographer, printing center; Leon Osborne Jr., professor of atmospheric sciences and director of the Regional Weather Information Center; Annette Rieder, administrative clerk, anatomy and cell biology; Denise Schafer, research specialist, GFHNRC; Mary Jo Schill, clinical assistant professor of communication sciences and disorders; Karen Sue Senger, duplicating machine operator, duplicating services; Lowell Stanlake, assistant professor of mechanical engineering; Cheryl Stjern, medical laboratory technician, GFHNRC; Kent Streibel, pilot, aerospace; Rosemary Thue, assistant to the vice president for research; Judy Westerman, administrative clerk, EERC; Richard Wilsnack, professor of neuroscience; Sharon Wilsnack, Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor of neuroscience; Fredrick Wittmann, director of project development and assistant to the vice president for student and outreach services.

 

Reminder to complete harassment training program

We thank those who have completed harassment training. If you have not yet completed the training, please do so immediately. This training is required for all faculty and staff, graduate students who teach, and students who supervise others in support of UND’s efforts to promote a respectful campus community for everyone. If you have any questions regarding how to access the training program, please contact the Office of General Counsel at 777-6345. Thanks for your cooperation.

– Charles Kupchella, president.

 

Three provost candidates will visit campus

Three candidates for the position of provost and vice president for academic affairs will visit the University in February and March, according to Martha Potvin, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and chair of the search committee.

The three candidates and their schedules follow:

Fredrick Dobney, professor of history at Western Michigan University, where he served as provost and vice president for academic affairs for two years.
Thursday, Feb. 19:
9-10 a.m. — Meeting with department chairs and campus administrators, 10-12 Swanson Hall.
3:30 p.m. — Open reception, talk and Q&A, North Dakota Museum of Art.
4:30 p.m. — Meeting with faculty, North Dakota Museum of Art.

Susan Coultrap-McQuin, dean of social and behavioral sciences, Minnesota State University, Mankato.
Monday, Feb. 23:
9-10 a.m. — Meeting with department chairs and campus administrators, 10-12 Swanson Hall.
3:30 p.m. — Open reception, talk and Q&A, North Dakota Museum of Art.
4:30 p.m. — Meeting with faculty, North Dakota Museum of Art.

Sona Karentz Andrews, vice provost, academic affairs, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.
Thursday, March 4:
9-10 a.m. — Meeting with department chairs and campus administrators, TBA.
3:30 p.m. — Open reception, talk and Q&A, North Dakota Museum of Art.
4:30 p.m. — Meeting with faculty, North Dakota Museum of Art.

Fredrick John Dobney
Ph.D., Rice University, 1970 (history)
B.A., Baylor University, 1966 (history)

A professor of history at Western Michigan University, Fredrick Dobney served as Western Michigan’s provost and vice president for academic affairs (2000-2002), where he was responsible for all of the academic areas, including the seven academic colleges, the university libraries, registrar, admissions, financial aid, international programs, and academic collective bargaining. During his time at Western, Dobney initiated an extensive assessment effort designed to generate information for use in making decisions about curriculum and resource allocation.

Dobney’s past experience includes serving as executive vice president and provost and professor of social sciences at Michigan Technological University (1993-2000) and as professor of history at Washington State University, Loyola University, and St. Louis University. From 1987-1993, he was vice provost for extended university services at Washington State University. At Loyola University he served as dean of City College, dean of continuing education, and director of special programs (1981-1986). Dobney held a number of administrative positions at Saint Louis University: director of man, technology, and society program (1973-1980), director of Copper Mountain summer school program (1977-1980), and acting associate dean of the graduate school (1980-1981).

Dobney was a member of the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges Commission on Human Resources and Social Change (1994-2002). He was a consultant to the National Science Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities and has received over $700,000 in grant support. He has provided service on the MITN Board of Directors for the state of Michigan and the telecommunications advisory committee for the state of Washington. His teaching fields include American technology and recent American history with publications involving United States presidential elections. In 1979 he received the Adult Education Teacher of the Year Award from the St. Louis Adult Education Council.

In addition to many papers, book reviews, proceedings, articles and co-writing a monograph on “Evaluation of the National Register Eligibility of the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal Lock in Orleans Parish, Louisiana,” Dobney is the author of two books: River Engineers on the Middle Mississippi (Government Printing Office, 1978) and Selected Papers of Will Clayton (The Johns Hopkins Press, 1971).

Susan Coultrap-McQuin
Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1979 (American studies)
B.S., Iowa State University, 1969 (English and French)

As dean of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Minnesota State University, Mankato since 1995, Susan Coultrap-McQuin has helped build the college’s reputation for academic excellence, applied learning, collaborative projects, and commitment to diversity. Within the college she has increased attention to student learning; promoted continuous improvement through planning and assessment; enhanced shared governance in a collective bargaining setting; improved faculty recruitment and diversity; increased support for faculty research and scholarship; promoted technology and teaching initiatives; and expanded centers and programs focused on diversity, aging, student-faculty research, global perspectives, and citizenship issues. In addition, she has increased resources for faculty development, expanded student advising services, and improved written and electronic communications between the college and campus, alumni, and media.

Coultrap-McQuin has gained university-wide experience as interim vice president of academic affairs and as co-chair of such committees as the enrollment management task force, the technology roundtable, planning committee, program review and assessment committee, and the North Central Association focused visit committee. She has actively participated in college and university-wide fund-raising activities. Beyond the campus she has served as a board member on the Minnesota Humanities Commission, the Minnesota Council on Economic Education, the Minnesota ACE-Network, and the Collaboration for the Advancement of College Teaching and Learning. She currently serves as a board member on the national Council of Colleges of Arts and Sciences.

Prior to coming to MSU, Coultrap-McQuin worked for the University of Maryland, European Division; Michigan State University; and the University of Minnesota, Duluth, where she headed women’s studies for nine years and directed a study abroad program for two years. She earned her doctorate in American Studies from the University of Iowa and was tenured and promoted to full professor during her years at UMD. Dr. Coultrap-McQuin has been recognized for her work on 19th century women writers and their publishers. She has also published and presented on feminist ethics, women’s studies, higher education, and teaching topics.

Sona Karentz Andrews
Ph. D., Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, 1981 (geography)
M. A., Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona, 1977 (geography)
B. A., Worcester State College, Worcester, Massachusetts, 1975 (geography)

The vice provost for academic affairs at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee since 2003, Sona Karentz Andrews has served at UW-Milwaukee as associate vice chancellor of academic affairs (2001-2003), assistant vice chancellor of academic affairs (1995-2000), and as professor (1994-present) and associate professor (1988-1994) of geography. She spent 2000-2001 as an American Council on Education (ACE) Fellow at Carthage College in Kenosha, Wis. She served as an assistant professor of geography at the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, from 1981 to 1988.
At UW-Milwaukee, she is responsible for all campus personnel decisions, including faculty recruitment, hiring, and development. She initiated an employee professional development program and is credited for the University being ranked sixth best place for women to work by Milwaukee Magazine in 2003. She developed UW’s first technology plan and has been instrumental in instituting practices that have helped the institution attract and retain diverse faculty and staff. She works closely with the deans of all schools/colleges on matters related to budget, curriculum, and new initiatives.

She has served as a board member for Wisconsin Women in Higher Education Leadership and is the state coordinator for the American Council on Education Fellows, has served on the editorial boards of academic journals in her field, and has received grants totaling more than $630,000. Presently she is a committee member in Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Barbara Lawton’s Fund Raising Task Force on Wisconsin Women = Prosperity Initiative.

Andrews is interested in interactive mapping, tactual mapping for people with sensory impairments, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). In addition to a number of publications, Andrews is the author of “Beyond Seeing and Hearing : Teaching Geography to Sensory Impaired Children — An Integrated Based Curriculum Approach,” and cartographer for the “Minnesota Travel Companion : A Guide to History Along Minnesota’s Highways” and “Wisconsin Travel Companion : A Guide to History Along Wisconsin’s Highways.”

 

Nominations sought for Chester Fritz Distinguished Professors

Nominations are sought for individuals to be considered as a Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor. Criteria and procedures for the nominations and selection follow. Nomination packets are due to the respective dean’s office by March 1; nominators must be a Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor, full professor, or department chair.
Chester Fritz Distinguished Professorship criteria and appointment procedures

Criteria

  • Demonstrated achievement across research, teaching, and service with significant national or regional recognition in any one of these missions.
  • Significant professional contributions throughout his/her career. However, the basis for selection of Chester Fritz Professors will be heavily weighted toward one’s accomplishments at UND.
  • Recognition by University of North Dakota colleagues as a faculty member who has made a valuable contribution to the quality of UND’s academic programs.
  • Full-time member of the faculty which includes all ranked teaching and research personnel. Department chairs are eligible if he/she is a full-time member of the faculty. (Full-time administrators, e.g., vice presidents and deans, are not eligible.)

Terms of appointment
Once awarded, the recipient always carries the title of Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor.

Nomination Process
The nomination packet should contain sufficient information for the committee to evaluate the nominee.

  • The nominator(s) must submit a nomination letter. Nominator(s) must be a Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor, full professor, or department chair.
  • College deans must second all nominations in writing.
  • Letters of support from other faculty are encouraged.
  • A current curriculum vitae of the nominee must accompany the nomination.

Dates and deadlines

  • Nomination packets are due in the college dean’s office by March 1.
  • Complete nomination packets with letters from the nominator(s) and seconder (college dean) are due in the graduate school by mid-March.
  • The graduate dean convenes a selection committee appointed by the provost and forwards a rank ordered list of names to the provost by April 1 with specific recommendations for who should be awarded the Chester Fritz Professorship.
  • The provost reviews the committee’s recommendations and forwards the recommendations to the president.
  • Chester Fritz Distinguished Professorships are awarded at spring commencement.

— John Ettling, provost and vice president for academic affairs.). Other recent spring enrollments include 11,224 in 2002, 10,438 in 2001, 10,061 in 2000, and 9,686 in 1999.

 

Faculty, researchers sought for UND experts directory

President Charles Kupchella is asking faculty and researchers to help “populate” the newly redesigned online UND experts directory. Created by the Office of University Relations, the web site is one of several ways in which UND will showcase its expertise and at the same time provide access to service. It will also be a resource that will allow colleagues, the media, and the public in general to connect to expertise on campus. The UND Experts Directory can be accessed at http://www.und.edu/experts. The site currently spotlights academic units and stand-alone research centers, but it will soon be modified to include non-academic service units.

The retooled web site now features a searchable database. For example, type in “gene” and the following names (added during various test phases) pop up in the database: David Bradley, Ann Flower, Mahesh Lakshman, John Martsolf, Peter Meberg, Roger Melvold, Darrin Muggli, Matthew Nilles, Kevin Young.

The process for getting into the database is simple. The online submission form is designed to allow faculty and researchers to cut and paste from their vita, or, if you prefer, type in fresh material. In addition to basic information (name, title, contact information, etc.), the form allows you to include information under the following categories:

  • Education, Publications, Consulting
  • Research, Grants, Special
  • Presentations, Patents, Works in Progress

To participate, faculty and researchers can go to http://www.und.edu/experts/submit and begin filling in the form. Note that you will be asked to provide your NAID number (which will be kept confidential). This will allow you to modify your entry at a later date. Faculty members, for example, may want to update their entries when they provide their October supplements.

 
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EVENTS TO NOTE
 

Applicants sought for Remele Fellowships

Humanities faculty members who plan to apply for a $5,000 Remele Memorial Fellowship from the North Dakota Humanities Council may consult with Richard Beringer (professor emeritus of history) Friday, Feb. 20, from noon to 1:30 p.m. in 22 Montgomery Hall.

The North Dakota Humanities Council announces the competition for the 2004 Larry Remele Memorial Fellowship Program. The program offers up to five fellowships of $5,000 each to applicants who are both scholars and skilled public presenters. Basic qualifications are at least an M.A. in history, philosophy, languages, linguistics, literature, archaeology, jurisprudence, ethics, or comparative religion, or an M.A. in the history, theory, and criticism of the arts or in the social sciences if the approach is historical or philosophical. Applications from graduate students are welcomed, if they possess the M.A. at the time of application. Topics need not be focused on North Dakota history or culture.

There is no official application form, but see the NDHC web site at www.nd-humanities.org for the required format and information. The application deadline is Monday, March 1. Completed applications should be sent to:

The North Dakota Humanities Council
Larry Remele Memorial Fellowship Program
2900 Broadway E., Suite 3
P.O. Box 2191
Bismarck, ND 58502-2191

For complete information see the North Dakota Humanities Council web site at www.nd-humanities.org and click on “Fellowship Guidelines.” You may also call the council office at 1-800-338-6543 or D. Jerome Tweton at 1-888-626-0207.

– Richard Beringer (professor emeritus of history), representing the North Dakota Humanities Council.

 

Forums will focus on “The American Indian Experience”

Beginning this month and leading up to the 35th annual University of North Dakota Indian Association powwow in April, UND has scheduled a series of book discussions and forums on the topic of “Exploring the American Indian Experience.”

The events, sponsored by UND’s American Indian Programs Council and a number of campus and community entities, are free of charge and open to the public. The schedule:

Feb. 23: Discussion of The Dull Knifes of Pine Ridge: A Lakota Odyssey by Joe Starita, 7 to 9 p.m. in UND’s Barnes & Noble University Bookstore. Birgit Hans, associate professor of Indian studies, will discuss this account of four generations of an American Indian family from South Dakota that, according to critics, offers a unique glimpse into Lakota culture from the 1870s to the 1990s.

March 1: Community forum, 7 to 9 p.m. in the Grand Forks Herald community room. Jim Grijalva, associate professor of law, will discuss “Current Issues in Indian Country,” which range from state-tribal jurisdictions and demographics to treaties and gambling casinos.

April 1: Community forum, 7 to 9 p.m. in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. Brian Gilley, assistant professor of Indian studies, and Russ McDonald, associate research director of the National Resource Center on Native American Aging at UND, both of whom will be involved in the UNDIA powwow on April 2-4 at the Hyslop Sports Center, will explain the role of tradition in modern powwows. Dancers and musicians will perform and explain the significance of various aspects of the powwow and of American Indian dancing.

More information about the events and the availability of the Starita book is available at www.conted.und.edu/AIE.

 

Associate VP-research candidate visits campus

Laura Jenski, a candidate for the position of associate vice president for research, will be on campus for a second interview. An open forum for faculty is set for Tuesday, Feb. 24, from 3:15 to 4:15 p.m. in 10-12 Swanson Hall. – Vice president for research office.

 

Graduate committee meets Monday

The graduate committee will meet Monday, Feb. 23, from 3:05 to 5 p.m. in 305 Twamley Hall. The agenda follows:

1. Approval of minutes.

2. Program review of the graduate programs (M.A. and Ph.D.) in communication (Mabey and Munski).

3. Change in prerequisites for Geology 532 from Geol/GeoE 417, Geol 427, Math 265, or consent of instructor to GeoE E 417, GeoE 427, Math 265, or consent of instructor.

4. Request for new course, Thesis 998 in chemical engineering, environmental engineering, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, and request for new course, Dissertation 999 in engineering.

5. Matters arising.

6. Summer research professorship subcommittee: Members of the subcommittee reviewing summer research professorships should plan on staying to discuss these applications. (Ames, Andres, Berger, Norman)

— Joseph Benoit, dean, graduate school.

 

Robinson lecture is Feb. 24

The librarians and staff of the Chester Fritz Library invite all members of the UND community to attend the 13th annual Elwyn B. Robinson Lecture Tuesday, Feb. 24, from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. in the East Asian Room of the Chester Fritz Library (fourth floor). Kathleen McLennan will present “The Proof of the Pudding: Theatre Research and Performance.” UND ensembleVivo will provide music, and a reception will follow the presentation.

Dr. McLennan, chair and associate professor of theatre arts, holds a doctorate in theatre history and criticism from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has published articles on 19th and 20th Century American theatre and teaches classes in theatre history, playwriting, and dramatic criticism. While at UND, Dr. McLennan has directed Buried Child by Sam Shepard, Wit by Margaret Edson, Hedda Gabler by Henrik Ibsen, and Dancing at Lughnasa by Brian Friel. She has begun a new area of research in Jacobean playwrights and is preparing a presentation on John Webster’s The Duchess of Malfi for the upcoming Mid-America Theatre Conference.

The Robinson Lecture series began in 1991 on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of Professor Elwyn B. Robinson’s publication, A History of North Dakota. Professor Robinson, whose career spanned 35 years at UND, was a distinguished member of the history faculty. The lecture, together with the library’s compilation of faculty and staff publications and presentations, is designed to recognize the scholarly accomplishments of the UND community.

– Chester Fritz Library.

 

Campus Ministry series addresses tolerance

The Campus Ministry Association is hosting “Tolerance: There’s Trouble in the Neighborhood” in its Theology for Lunch series Tuesdays at noon, Wittenberg Lutheran Chapel, 3120 Fifth Avenue North. A free lunch is included; bring a friend.
On Feb. 24, Erik Mansager, director, counseling center, will present “Where’s My Limit? Does It Change in the Context of Relationship?”This series is sponsored by the Campus Ministry Association, with St. Thomas Aquinas Newman Center, Christus Rex, Lutheran Campus Center, Wittenberg Lutheran Chapel, and United Campus Ministry.

– Tom Petros, psychology, for the Campus Ministry Association.

 

NASA astronauts, one an alum, visit campus

In celebration of National Engineers Week, NASA astronauts Sandra H. Magnus and Karen L. Nyberg (School of Engineering and Mines alumna) will visit the School of Engineering and Mines (SEM) Wednesday, Feb. 25. Magnus will give a presentation on the International Space Station at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 25, in 100 Leonard Hall. Nyberg will address the SEM Engineers’ Week awards banquet that evening. In addition to UND events, the astronauts will make presentations to students at Red River High School and South Middle School. To view the astronauts’ biographies, go to www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/astrobio_activemgmt.html.

For further information, please contact me at 777-3390.

– Cheryl Osowski, outreach coordinator, School of Engineering and Mines.

 

Noted researcher to speak at geography forum

Darrell E. Napton, professor of geography at South Dakota State University and researcher with the USGS EROS Data Center in Sioux Falls, S.D., will present a seminar at 4 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 25, in the Fred Orth Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union, with a social beginning at 3:30 p.m. Dr. Napton’s talk, titled “Land Use Dynamics in the Forested Southeast,” is presented as part of the geography department’s seminar series, the forum for contemporary geographic issues. Dr. Napton’s research is land use dynamics, historical geography of land use and land cover changes, and environmental consequences of land use changes. All are welcome to attend.

Dr. Napton’s visit is part of the visiting geographical scientist program, a joint program of the Association of American Geographers and Gamma Theta Upsilon.

– Bradley Rundquist, assistant professor of geography.

 

Leadership workshops held through March 3

The Memorial Union leadership workshop series will continue Wednesday, Feb. 25, at 3 p.m. in the Memorial Union Leadership Inspiration Room. Gordon Henry will present “The Art of Caring Leadership.” Additional workshops will be held in the Leadership Inspiration Room (Room 115) each Wednesday at 3 p.m. The final presentation March 3 is, “Thinking Outside the Box,” by Steve Edwards.

For more information, call 777-2898 or e-mail leadership@und.edu.

–Memorial Union.

 

Memorial service planned for Walter Ellis

A memorial service for Walter Ellis, professor of history, will be held at the North Dakota Museum of Art at 3 p.m. Friday, Feb. 27. Please come and join us as we celebrate the life and accomplishments of this truly remarkable individual, who passed away Jan. 12. His obituary is available at http://www.und.edu/dept/our/uletter/01232004.html#35 .

— Jim Mochoruk, associate professor and chair of history.

 

Fulbright scholar will discuss intercultural communication

Enrique Esquivel-Lopez, visiting Fulbright scholar, Universidad Iberoamericana, Mexico City, will present “Intercultural Communication in the Americas: An Interpretivist Approach,” Friday, Feb. 27, from noon to 1 p.m. in 334 O’Kelly Hall.
A reception following Dr. Esquivel-Lopez’s presentation will be held in the Schlasinger Reading Room, 200 O’Kelly Hall.

The talk is co-sponsored by the Office of Instructional Development and School of Communication.

 

Communication sciences hosts colloquium

Charlene Chamberlain, Carol Johnson, Jodi Klein, and Cynthia Lofton will present at the communication sciences and disorders colloquium Friday, Feb. 27, at 1 p.m. in 150 Gamble Hall. The title of their talk is “Evidenced-Based Practice in SLP: Special Issues.” Everyone is invited.

This is the first in the spring CSD colloquia series.

– Manish Rami, communication sciences and disorders.

 

LEEPS lecture set for Feb. 27

Matthew Kohn from the University of South Carolina will give the next LEEPS lectures Friday, Feb. 27. At noon, he will present “The Chemistry of Teeth, the Rise of the Cascades, and the Cooling of Antarctica,” 100 Leonard Hall. At 3 p.m., he will consider “Repeated Miocene-Pliocene Thrusting at the Plate-Tectonic Velocities in the Central Himalaya, Nepal,” in 109 Leonard Hall.

Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Science lecture program (LEEPS) brings nationally and internationally known scientists and others to UND to give talks on cutting edge science and engineering. Lectures cover a wide range of topics, including academic science, applied engineering, and environmental issues of current significance.

For more information, contact Dexter Perkins at 777-2991.

– Geology and geological engineering, 777-2248.

 

Doctoral examination set for Lori Listug-Lunde

The final examination for Lori Listug-Lunde, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in clinical psychology, is set for 2 p.m. Friday, Feb. 27, in 210 Corwin-Larimore Hall. The dissertation title is “A Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Depression in Native American Middle-School Students.” Nancy Vogeltanz-Holm (neuroscience and Center for Health Promotion) is the committee chair.

The public is invited to attend.

– Joseph Benoit, dean, graduate school.

 

PRSSA presents benefit performance

The Public Relations Student Society of America will give a benefit production of Eve Ensler’s “The Vagina Monologues” as part of the V-Day 2004 college campaign at 8 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 28, Empire Arts Center, downtown Grand Forks.
V-Day is a worldwide movement to stop sexual violence against women and girls, and to proclaim Valentine’s Day as the day to celebrate women and demand the end of abuse.

For more information on this event, please contact Tiffiny Dunn at tiffiny4927@hotmail.com or Shelle Michaels at shellemichaels@msn.com.

— Jan Orvik, editor, for PRSSA.

 

Museum opens “Snow Country Prison” Feb. 29

The North Dakota Museum of Art will open “Snow Country Prison: Interned in North Dakota” on Sunday, Feb. 29, followed by a symposium on Monday, March 1.

In 1941 the U. S. Justice Department converted North Dakota’s Fort Lincoln from a surplus military post into an internment camp to detain people arrested in the United States as enemy aliens. Over its five-year operation as a camp, the Bismarck facility housed about 1,500 men of German nationality, and over 1,800 of Japanese ancestry, many of whom were American citizens. The first group of Japanese and German men were arrested by the FBI in the days immediately after Pearl Harbor. The arrests were done under the authority of the Alien Enemies Act, and these so-called “enemy aliens” were removed from their homes, primarily on the West Coast and East Coast, and sent to camps in isolated parts of the country. This is the first exhibition to examine this almost-forgotten time in North Dakota history.

The schedule follows:

Sunday, Feb. 29
3 p.m., exhibition opens to the public.

4 p.m., keynote address by John Christgau.
Twenty years ago Christgau wrote the defining book about North Dakota’s Fort Lincoln, Enemies: World War II Alien Internment. Based on interviews and FBI and National Archives records, Enemies follows the lives of eight internees prior to incarceration at Fort Lincoln, life there, and their lives after internment. Enemies, which was recommended for the National Book Award, poses serious questions about the rights of immigrants in an American democracy, then and now. Christgau’s book is available in the Museum Shop.

5 p.m., buffet dinner for all guests (suggested donation $5).

6 p.m., film screening led by Satsuki Ina featuring “Fort Lincoln Internment Camp” (KVLY Fargo, N.D.), “Conversation With A German Internee - Fort Lincoln” (Kurt Peters), “Children of the Camps” and “From A Silk Cocoon Trailer.”
Dr. Ina is the producer and project director of “Children of the Camps,” a one-hour documentary that captures the experiences of six Americans of Japanese ancestry who were confined as children to internment camps during WW II. Ina was born in the Tule Lake Internment Camp where she lived the first years of her life with her mother and brother. Her father was sent to Bismarck, where he spent 18 months.

Currently Ina is editing the correspondence between her parents during the 18 months they were separated for publication in a book and for a documentary film. Dr. Ina’s father wrote the haiku poems, four or five a day, that will be used as the wall text in the exhibition.

Monday, March 1
4 to 6 p.m., symposium followed by wine and hors d’oeuvres. Participants: John Christgau, Karen Ebel, Satsuki Ina, Isao Fujimoto, Robert Nebel

Karen Ebel is the daughter of Max Ebel, who was interned in Ft. Lincoln from May 1943 to June 1944. On May 18, 2003, Los Angeles County Commissioner Frank De Balough presented a medal to the German American activist, who has been instrumental in bringing the story of the German American internment to media and Congressional attention. She has been the driving force behind legislation to get Congress to pass the Wartime Treatment Study Act, which she helped Sen. Feingold’s office draft. At the symposium, she will speak about her research into enemy alien issues and will tell her father’s story on the railroad crews that worked out of Fort Lincoln. Max Ebel’s health will not permit him to travel to the exhibition.

Isao Fujimoto, a long-time professor at the University of California Davis, founded the Asian American studies program and the UC Davis graduate program in community development. An activist for the nurturing of civil societies, Dr. Fujimoto has had a special interest in the World War II internment of Japanese Americans. At a recent Enemy Alien exhibition in Sacramento, Dr. Fujimoto read excerpts from a half dozen letters between his father and himself while his father was confined at the Missoula camp. What struck Satsuki Ina was how those passages conveyed the human emotions and added a personal dimensions to topics such as social justice and civil rights.

Nineteen-year-old Robert Nebel was a mess boy on the Peter Hurll, a Standard Oil tanker. In September of 1939, with Germany’s attack on Poland, Standard Oil removed all German crewmen from its tankers, and Nebel was stranded in New York City. For almost two years he played soccer in the city and worked as a dishwasher. He was finally arrested in a Border Patrol sweep of East Coast “illegal aliens” on May of 1941 and, along with 220 other German men, was sent to Fort Lincoln. Today he is a U.S. citizen living in Florida.

Call the Museum for more information at 777-4195.

— North Dakota Museum of Art.

 

English chorale music spotlighted Feb. 29

The Grand Forks Master Chorale and the Oak Grove Lutheran Concert Choir will join forces for “An Evening of English Chorale Music,” Sunday, Feb. 29, 7 p.m. at United Lutheran Church. The Master Chorale portion of the concert will feature the works of William Byrd, Henry Purcell, George Fredric Handel, Charles V. Stanford, Benjamin Britten, Edward Elgar, R. Vaughan Williams, and John Rutter.

Now in its 21st year, the Grand Forks Master Chorale is a 40-plus-voice auditioned choir under the direction of Michael Weber with accompanist Lacey Oar. The Oak Grove Lutheran Concert Choir is under the direction of Paul Barta. Both choirs have outstanding reputations.

Tickets are $12 in advance, $15 at the door. Senior citizens get a break at $8 in advance, $10 at the door, and students get the best deal: $5 in advance, $7 at the door. Tickets are available through the Chester Fritz Auditorium box office, 777-4090. The Master Chorale is supported in part by the North Dakota Council on the Arts and the Myra Foundation. The Master Chorale is a member of the North Valley Arts Council.

 

Panel, presentations highlight scholarly forum

A panel discussion, “Proof in the Discipline” will open the graduate school’s scholarly forum at 9 a.m. Tuesday, March 2, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl with Jim Williams (theatre arts), Jack Weinstein (philosophy and religion), and Katherine Sorenson (graduate student in mathematics). Using theatre arts’ production of the play, “Proof” as a springboard, this panel will explore the concept of what constitutes a proof within the various disciplines. “Proof” runs all week at 7:30 p.m. from March 2-6 in the Burtness Lab Theatre.

Oral presentations will be held from 10:30 a.m. to noon March 2-4 in the Lecture Bowl. Presenters will be faculty and graduate students from various programs across campus. A poster session is scheduled for Thursday, March 4, from 2 to 4 p.m. in the Ballroom of the Memorial Union.

Of special interest are the keynote addresses to be held Tuesday and Wednesday, March 2 and 3, at 3:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. Mary Burgan, general secretary of the American Association of the University Professors, will present “Literature and Everyday Life: Pianos, Maps, and Microbes” Tuesday. On Thursday, March 4, Kerry Emanuel, professor of meteorology in the department of Earth, atmospheric, and planetary sciences at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will present “Hurricanes and Climate” in the Lecture Bowl. Receptions will precede each keynote address at 3 p.m.

Planning for the scholarly forum continues. Go to the graduate school’s web site for additional information or call 777-2786.

– Cynthia Shabb, assistant dean, graduate school.

 

Golf seminar scheduled for March 5-6

The Dakota Chapter of the P.G.A. will hold the 2004 Dakota P.G.A. Golf Seminar, Friday, March 5, from 1 to 5 p.m., and Saturday, March 6, from 9 a.m. to noon at the Hyslop Sports Center. The seminar is presented in cooperation with UND and benefits the Fighting Sioux golf team.

The Dakota Chapter Golf Professionals have designed this seminar to accommodate players of all skill levels, including beginners. All golfers will benefit from the emphasis on sound swing fundamentals, golf coaches will improve their teaching skills, and young players will learn the rules of golf as well as course management skills.

Seminar coordinators are Leo Marchel, P.G.A. professional, and Rob Stiles, UND men’s golf coach. The seminar will include basic swing fundamentals, short game techniques, iron game, individual video tape session, “Rules of Golf” class, equipment and course management class, and sand trap and putting. In addition, there will be a specific curriculum designed especially for golf coaches. This program will help coaches deal with common problems experienced by their team members. We will “teach the coaches to teach.”

For questions or further information, call Leo Marchel at 772-3912 or Rob Stiles at 777-2155. The registration fee is $30 for students, $40 for adults. UND students may take the seminar for one credit, course number 63321, golf 206.

– Rob Stiles, men’s golf coach.

 

Public meeting will address storm water prevention plans

The Federal Clean Water Act established storm water requirements to control the direct discharge of pollutants into waters of the state. Under delegation from EPA and the North Dakota Department of Health, the City of Grand Forks, University of North Dakota and Grand Forks County have been given responsibility for regulating the discharge of storm water from their jurisdictions to the Red River and the English Coulee which flows through the City of Grand Forks.
A public meeting will be held at 7 p.m. Monday, March 8, at City Hall Council Chambers, 255 N. Fourth St., at the regularly scheduled council meeting.

This notice has been issued to meet the requirement to inform the public about the upcoming meeting so they may comment on the storm water pollution prevention plans. Specific questions on any aspect of the city’s, county’s, or University’s storm water pollution prevention plan may be directed to the contacts listed.

For further information about the city plan, contact Mike Shea, environmental coordinator, City of Grand Forks, P.O. Box 5200, Grand Forks, ND 58206-5200, (701) 746-2713. For the county plan, contact Carol McMahon at 780-8412, and for the University plan contact Paul Clark at 777-3005.

 
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ANNOUNCEMENTS
 

Campus walking trail maps available

Enjoy walking? Feel stressed and need a break? Want to get in shape for spring? Want to become renewed and invigorated when outside? Check out the new walking trails on campus.

The physical wellness subcommittee along with Rick Tonder, associate director of facilities, has created 14 walking/running trails for the UND campus. The trails, approximately one mile in length, cover most regions of campus and can be interconnected for a 5-10 mile walk. Three of the trails are indoor routes for year-round use. The School of Medicine loop even includes stair climbing to increase the workout.

Maps are available at the Wellness Center and Memorial Union and online through the UND home page at http://www.und.edu/walk and the Wellness Center home page at http://wellness.und.edu/wellness.

Obseity and poor fitness are serious health crises in America. College campuses are not immune. Let’s lower the risk at UND. Get active, get fit, and get healthy. See you on the trails.

– Matt Remfert, co-chair, physical wellness subcommittee.

 

Midterm student feedback process offered for faculty

As we approach the middle of the semester, now is the ideal time to make plans to use the SGID (Small Group Instructional Diagnosis) method for receiving midterm feedback from students in your classes. The SGID process, facilitated by a trained faculty colleague, is a method of soliciting student perceptions about the progress of their learning. Since the SGID is done by an outsider to your class, students are free to be direct. But the process differs from semester-end evaluation in two key ways: (1) SGIDs are done during mid-semester, so you can make immediate use of what you learn from your students; and (2) SGIDs are designed to be formative, which means the information is for your own use as a teacher rather than for an outsider’s evaluation of your teaching. The SGID process is flexible enough to be used with both large and small classes and by both beginning and experienced faculty.

For more information about the SGID process, contact Joan Hawthorne at 777-6381 or joan_hawthorne@und.nodak.edu. If you would like to request an SGID, contact Jana Hollands at 777-4998 or jana_hollands@und.nodak.edu.

— Joan Hawthorne, Writing Across the Curriculum.

 

Study Abroad staff available for classroom presentation

The study abroad staff from the Office of International Programs is available to make classroom presentations regarding study abroad opportunities. The presentation format and length are negotiable. To schedule please contact Ray Lagasse, assistant director for education abroad at 777-2938, raymond.lagasse@mail.und.edu, or Jen Aasvestad, education abroad advisor, 777-4756, jenniferaasvestad@mail.und.nodak.edu.

Thank you to all the professors who allowed us into your classrooms earlier this semester. The person-to-person contact through our presence in your classrooms has sparked the interest of many students.

We ask that you remind your students that March 1 is the deadline for applying for study abroad for summer and fall semester. Applications are available in the international center across from the Memorial Union.

– Ray Lagasse and Jen Aasvestad, Office of International Programs.

 

Michelle Meyer hired as grants officer

Grants and contracts administration has hired Michelle Meyer as a grants and contracts officer. Formerly employed by research and program development, she will replace Corey Graves, who has moved to a new grants officer position in the medical school. The change in personnel has resulted in a revision of sponsoring agencies handled by some of the grants officers. Please refer to the grants and contracts administration web site at www.und.edudept/undgca/ for the detailed listing. We ask for the University community’s patience while this transition is made and invite you to stop in to meet Michelle.

– Sally Horner, grants and contracts administration.

 

Nelson named associate director of administration and finance at medical school

Terry Nelson has been named associate director of administration and finance at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

Nelson, who joined the medical school in 1991, will continue to expand his role as budget manager and financial analyst as well as oversee facility management functions.

An alumnus of UND, Nelson holds a bachelor of science degree in business administration. He joined the facilities division in 1985, worked in the personnel services office for two years, then moved to the medical school.

– School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

 

Comments sought on equal opportunity/ affirmative action statement

In the spring of 2003, the University senate passed a resolution asking that a committee be formed to review the UND equal opportunity/affirmative action policy statement and procedures for complaints of discrimination or harassment.
Committee members are: Leigh Jeanotte (American Indian student services), chair; Wendy Hume (criminal justice and women studies), recorder; Leif Bergerud (student representative); M.C. Diop (multicultural student services); Julie Evans (legal counsel); Kay Mendick (women’s center); Sally Page (affirmative action); and Faythe Thureen (languages).
Since October 2003, this committee has been reviewing the document and suggesting changes, with the goal of making it more effective and accessible.

The purpose of this message is to invite members of the university community to examine the document and provide input into the revision process.

The document, “Procedures for Complaints of Discrimination or Harassment,” can be found in the Code of Student Life and the Faculty Handbook. It can also be accessed and downloaded at www.und.edu/dept/aao/Pol.htm

Thank you in advance for your assistance in reviewing a policy that responds effectively to the needs of UND’s growing community.

Please respond by Monday, March 1, to Leigh Jeanotte, American Indian Student Services, Box 8274, 777-3296, leigh.jeanotte@und.nodak.edu

— Leigh Jeanotte, chair, and Wendy Hume, recorder, ad hoc harassment policy and procedure review committee.

 

Annual staff performance evaluations due March 1

Annual staff employee performance evaluations are due Monday, March 1. The performance management plan form is available electronically as either a WordPerfect or Word document. To receive your copy via e-mail, contact us at human.resources@mail.und.nodak.edu. The Word document version may also be found online at www.humanresources.und.edu/Forms/forms.html. If hard copies are preferred or if you have questions, please call us at 777-4361. Please review and discuss the evaluation with the employee and return the signed forms to human resources, Box 8010, no later than March 1. – Diane Nelson, director, human resources.

 

Please announce “Getting Started” positions to students

student assistant positions for “Getting Started 2004.” We will hire current undergraduate students who will have been enrolled at UND for at least one academic year by May 2004. These positions require good interpersonal and organizational skills. Qualified individuals must be dependable, cooperative and willing to demonstrate a positive and enthusiastic attitude about UND. Applications are available at student academic services, 201 Memorial Union, 777-2117. Deadline is Friday, Feb. 27. – Bridget Drummer, academic advisor.

 

EERC technology improves power plant efficiency

Researchers at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) have made major strides to improve the efficiency and dramatically reduce emissions of coal-fired power plants by burning a combination of pure oxygen and coal to generate electricity in an advanced power system. The material used in the system is the same alloy used to make F-16 fighter jet engines; it is the first time it has been used in a coal-fired power system.

In a demonstration project conducted at the EERC, a natural gas- and coal-fired system was used to test a very-high-temperature heat exchanger, which is the heart of an advanced high-efficiency power plant – otherwise known as an indirectly fired combined cycle (IFCC). It could hypothetically have no emissions whatsoever.

The project is funded by an Xcel Energy renewable development fund, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and managed through the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory.

– EERC.

 

UND medical students learn basics of family medicine

Eight medical students from the School of Medicine and Health Sciences are studying family medicine with practicing physicians in health care facilities throughout the region.

The students, who are in their third year of medical school, are taking eight weeks of family medicine training with UND-affiliated physician-faculty members in Belcourt, Bismarck, Harvey, Hillsboro, Valley City and Wahpeton in North Dakota and Moorhead, Minn. Students assist the physicians with patient care as part of their educational experience.

– School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

 

EERC selected for EPA coal combustion products partnership

The Energy & Environmental Research Center has been recognized as a pioneering member in the Coal Combustion Products Partnership (C2P2), a cooperative effort of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the coal combustion products industry aimed at increasing the beneficial use of ash in an environmentally safe manner.

The EERC applied for membership in the C2P2 Program in August of 2003 and is one of 109 charter members in the program, which includes both federal and state agencies as well as industry organizations.

“We were the only research organization to be recognized during the C2P2 awards ceremony,” said EERC Research Manager Debra Pflughoeft-Hassett. “We couldn’t have done it without the strong support of our private industry partners.”

“There is no such thing as a waste – we consider ash as a partially refined resource,” said EERC Director Gerald Groenewold. “This partnership recognizes a 25-year commitment at the EERC in working with private industry and government partners to find environmentally friendly uses for these materials.”

There are significant environmental, economic, and performance benefits from using CCPs in a number of applications. About 80 million tons of CCPs (about 61 percent of the total produced) are still land-disposed in the United States annually. Currently, virgin materials are being mined when CCPs could be substituted, and energy consumption and greenhouse gases could be reduced by using more coal ash as a replacement for Portland cement.

The C2P2 program was undertaken to identify and develop informational materials on the benefits of using CCPs properly, to increase the overall use of CCPs from 36 to 45 percent by 2008, and to increase the use of coal ash in concrete from 13 million to 20 million tons by 2010.

The EERC utilized CCPs in the construction of its new 47,000-square-foot office building. The $6 million expansion utilizes fly ash concrete, which improves the strength and durability of the concrete by replacing a portion of the cement powder.

Cosponsors of the C2P2 program include the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), the American Coal Ash Association (ACAA), and the Utility Solid Waste-Activities Group (USWAG).

– Energy and Environmental Research Center.

 

Members sought for wellness task groups

The healthy UND coalition invites all students, faculty, and staff to join in making this a “healthy campus” by 2010.
The coalition is a campus-wide organization whose goal is to promote wellness in all seven dimensions. At its Oct. 30 meeting, members decided to focus on three of the 10 leading health indicators from the report “Healthy Campus 2010.” The areas chosen were physical activity, mental health, and overweight and obesity.

Task groups are now being formed to address each of these areas. The role of each task group will be to plan and implement activities that will focus awareness and education on these topics for students and the rest of the campus community.

A fourth task group is being formed to look at worksite wellness, and will develop a concept paper on how the University could design a program to address wellness in the workplace.

We invite you to take action to promote wellness on our campus by joining one of the task groups, which will meet about every two weeks. The task groups are being coordinated and supported by the wellness department, student health, and the counseling center.

Please e-mail Megan Rice to volunteer for one of the task groups: physical activity, mental health, overweight and obesity, or worksite wellness. Her e-mail address is meganrice@mail.und.nodak.edu.

— Wellness center.

 

ConnectND corner

Following is information on the ConnectND project, which will replace the current administrative system. For more information, visit www.nodak.edu/connectnd. For information on ConnectND at UND, visit www.und.edu/cnd.
Planning the way to accommodate change

Although managing transition was the theme, a workshop held in Mandan also provided an opportunity for about 60 representatives of North Dakota campuses and ConnectND project teams to discuss a variety of general and specific issues ranging from training schedules, availability of reports and what to expect during and after implementation.

Addressing a plea from campus administrators for information, Roch Hoedebecke, Maximus consulting project director, agreed to detail which business processes will become operational during the initial PeopleSoft implementation and which won’t.

Ellen Chaffee, Valley City State University president, reviewed the first year of managing change on a ConnectND pilot campus. Chaffee emphasized that everyone on campus will be impacted by ConnectND. Citing an example, Chaffee talked about the change at the pilot sites to a semi-monthly payroll with a lag, which ultimately became “a non-event” as a result of communication, caring, a salary advance program and cooperation from banks and others. Only 14 VCSU personnel used the salary advance to offset the payroll lag.

Teri Thorsen, human resources management systems project manager, suggested ConnectND staff and campus personnel keep the challenge ahead in context by viewing it as “a marathon, not a spring.”

The workshop answered some questions and posed others for later follow-up and fostered communication and a closer relationship among participants. Said Dickinson State University President Lee Vickers, who chairs the NDUS executive steering committee: “We really are all in this together – we are all doing this for the benefit of our students.”

— Jan Orvik, for the ConnectND project.

 

Please complete energy survey

An energy survey, 10 multiple choice questions created by students and faculty at UND measures your interest and willingness to help fund projects that would make the UND campus more environmentally friendly.
Two $25 gift certificates from Scheel’s Sporting Goods will be randomly awarded to participants.
Navigate to http://www.undeerc.org/energysurvey to participate.

— Jan Orvik, editor, for Kevin Harrison, graduate student.

 

Myers Gallery exhibits art from permanent collection

The Col. Myers Art Gallery at the Hughes Fine Arts Center will have a change of schedule. From March 1 to April 1, part of the art department permanent collection will be on display in the gallery. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

– Brian Paulsen, art.

 

Presenters invited for family connections conference

Professionals who serve children with special needs and their families are invited to submit ideas for presentations at the new North Dakota Family Connections Conference: When Children Have Special Needs. It will be held June 10-12 at the Doublewood Inn, Fargo. Proposals are due Monday, March 1.

This first-time conference seeks to build new ties and enhance family support by bringing together families with children who have delays, disabilities and chronic health needs and the professionals who support those families.
Professionals who serve kids with special needs and their families are invited to present, including: educators, early interventionists, family support specialists, social workers, childcare workers, child developmental specialists, legislators, administrators, counselors and other professionals who provide support to families.

All of the suggested topics will contribute to a broad discussion of this year’s theme: “Building New Ties and Enhancing Family Support.” Topics need to be relevant for both families and professionals as they have the option to attend the same sessions. Presenters at the ND Family Connection Conference should focus on the following strands/topic areas:

1. Disabilities
2. Early intervention
3. Education
4. Self-determination
5. Family support
6. Health

You may submit a proposal online at www.conted.und.edu/connections.

Concurrent session presenters receive a $100 all inclusive fee (travel reimbursement is not provided). Two-hour intensive session presenters receive a $200 all inclusive fee (travel reimbursement is not provided).
All accepted presenters also receive a complimentary full conference registration. This allows the presenter to receive admittance to all sessions and exhibits, continental breakfasts, lunch, refreshments, CEUs (except graduate credit, if approved) and the family fun night banquet.

For more information on how to submit a proposal, please visit www.conted.und.edu/connections. You may also contact UND Office of Conference Services at 777-2663 or toll free at 866-579-2663. All proposals must be submitted online and are due March 1.

Please share this information with your colleagues. We look forward to reviewing your proposals.

– Jennifer Raymond, coordinator, conference services, Division of Continuing Education.

 

Studio One features Lego tournament, proposed anti-bullying legislation

North Dakota’s first Lego tournament will be featured on the next edition of Studio One on Channel 3 in Grand Forks.
Follow the “Lego Lords,” a team of eight middle school students, as they participate in the first North Dakota Lego League State Tournament. Eight other teams will join them in Grand Forks to compete and demonstrate their mission to Mars robots. The story also features coaches and parents who explain ho the event teaches teamwork and cooperation.
Also on the next edition of Studio One: bullying has been identified as a problem among students in Minnesota’s public schools. Legislators are writing an anti-bullying bill to reduce the number of conflicts and harassment. The story includes opinions of Minnesota students and educators on the proposed bill.

Studio One is an award-winning news and information program produced at the University of North Dakota Television Center. The program airs live Thursdays at 5 p.m. on UND Channel 3. Rebroadcasts can be seen at 7 a.m., noon, 7 p.m., and 11 p.m. daily and on Saturdays at 10 a.m. Prairie Public Television airs Studio One on Saturday at 6 a.m. The program can also be seen in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan, Minot, Minneapolis, the Portland, Ore., metro area, and Winnipeg, Manitoba.

 

Donations sought for overseas troops

UND Campus Friends will send a St. Patrick’s Day gift pack and letter to troops overseas to be mailed out the week of Feb. 23. They are seeking the following donations: baby wipes, hand sanitizer, feminine hygiene products, breath mints/gum, sunscreen, detergent, batteries (AA), razors, shaving cream, toothbrushes, toothpaste, deodorant, boxes, tissues, phone cards (international), stamps, and notepads.

They ask that organizations and groups commit to buying enough of one item to give around 60 troops. They are seeking monetary donations for mailing and purchasing costs.

– Amanda Findley, Student government public relations coordinator.

 

Denim Day is last Wednesday of month

Wednesday, Feb. 25, is Denim Day. Dig out your button, pay your dollar, and enjoy “going casual” in the middle of the week. All proceeds go to charity. Tired of watching other offices and buildings have all the fun? Call me and I’ll set you up with buttons and posters for your area.

– Patsy Nies, enrollment services, 777-3791, for the denim day committee.

 
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GRANTS & RESEARCH
 

Funding opportunities will not run in University Letter

We are approaching the end of the year of our conversion from the Sponsored Programs Information Network (SPIN) system to Community of Science (COS). COS, which has been provided by the North Dakota State Board of Higher Education for all campuses, offers more extensive search capabilities than SPIN in addition to a variety of other services. The following text from the COS home page offers a brief description of the system:

“Community of Science, Inc. (COS) is the leading Internet site for the global R&D community. COS brings together the world’s most prominent scientists and researchers at more than 1,600 universities, corporations and government agencies worldwide. COS provides tools and services that enable these professionals to communicate, exchange information and find the people and technologies that are important to their work.

“These services include: COS Expertise, the database of detailed, first person profiles of more than 480,000 R&D professionals; COS Funding Opportunities, the largest source of grant information on the Web; COS Abstract Management System, an online publishing solution for universities and professional societies; and customized access to a range of professional reference databases including U.S. patents, MEDLINE, AGRICOLA, and GeoRef, among others.”

For many years, ORPD staff have selected representative samples from funding opportunities for a variety of academic areas from the SPIN and COS systems, and we have published them in the University Letter. However, the number of funding opportunities that are available greatly exceeds the number we can publish each week. We are concerned that faculty seeking research opportunities may miss them simply because they do not see something of interest in the University Letter. Consequently, as of July 1, 2004, we will change from listing a few samples of opportunities to encouraging faculty to subscribe to COS to receive announcements by e-mail or to conduct frequent searches for research opportunities using the COS system. For faculty who would like help transitioning to COS, ORPD will offer regularly scheduled workshops in the use of COS beginning in March 2004. Please check the University Letter for the time and place for the workshops. A set of instructions for using COS can be found on the ORPD web page: http://www.und.edu/dept/orpd/. To access the instructions, select funding search instructions on the web page.

— Will Gosnold, interim director, research and program development.

 

December grant awardees listed

The Office of Research and Program Development would like to congratulate the following faculty and staff who were listed as principal or co-principal investigators on awards received during the month of December 2003:

Atmospheric sciences, Xiquan Dong; rural health, Brad Gibbens; chemical engineering, Michael Mann; chemistry, Euguenii Kozliak; EERC, Steven Benson, Donald Cox, Bruce Dockter, Bruce Folkedahl, Steven Hawthorne, Michael Holmes, Dennis Laudal, Jason Laumb, Kyle Martin, Donald McCollor, John Pavlish, Darren Schmidt, Edward Steadman, Bradley Stevens, Ronald Timpe, Chad Wocken, Christopher Zygarlicke; family practice, Greg Greek; microbiology and immunology, Matthew Nilles; Regional Weather Information Center, Leon Osborne, Jeffrey Tilley; space studies, Robert Andres, Shanaka de Silva.

– William Gosnold, interim director, research and program development.

 

Scholarly activities committee awards travel grants

The Senate scholarly activities committee received 27 requests for funds to travel to domestic or Canadian destinations (a total of $25,458); and seven requests for funds to travel to Alaska, Hawaii, or foreign destinations (a total of $8,139), in response to the January call for proposals. The following awards were made at the committee meeting Jan. 29:

Domestic travel awards

Michael Anderegg, English, $344.90; Jean Chi-Jen Chen, institutional research, $334.90; Barbara Dahlen, nursing, $325; Jane Dunlevy, anatomy and cell biology, $408.40; Cullen Goenner, economics, $253.40; Marcia Gragert, nursing practice and role development, $324.90; Margaret Healy, educational leadership, $294.90; Xiaozhao Huang, English, $357.40; Susan Jeno, physical therapy, $275.40; Arthur Jones, art, $334.90; Lynda Kenney, technology, $391.90; Jason Lane, teaching and learning, $365.90; Patrick Luber, art, $362.50; Glenn Olsen, teaching and learning; $193.90; Douglas Peters, psychology, $350.90; Kimberly Porter, history, $240.40; Ty Reese, history, $339.40; Elizabeth Scharf, anthropology, $429.92; Richard Schultz, electrical engineering, $385.90; William Semke, mechanical engineering, $372.50; Craig Silvernagel, College of Business and Public Administration, $385.90; Cheryl Terrance, psychology, $350.90; Paul Todhunter, geography, $394.90; Min Wu, biochemistry and molecular biology, $354.90; Crystal Yang, art, $229.90; and Huang-Jan Yang, technology, $349.90.

Foreign Travel

Mary Askim-Lovseth, marketing, $855.81; Gayle Baldwin, philosophy and religion, $758; Bjorn Dahlen, Earth systems science institute, $1658; Sergio Gallo, music, $1,189.37; Mark Hoffmann, chemistry, $1,042; Paul Kucera, atmospheric sciences, $1,686; and Kathleen Tiermann, sociology, $523.

— James Hikins (communication), chair, Senate scholarly activities committee.

 

Research, grant opportunities listed

Following are research and grant opportunities. For additional information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278 or shirley_griffin@mail.und.nodak.edu.
Portions of the following data were derived from the Community of Science’s COS Funding OpportunitiesTM which is provided for the exclusive use of the University of North Dakota and may not be republished or made available outside the University of North Dakota in any form except via the COS Record ShareTM on the COS website.

ALPHA DELTA KAPPA, THE INTERNATIONAL HONORARY SORORITY FOR WOMEN EDUCATORS
Fine Arts Grants–Performing Arts Grants for stringed instruments and Visual Arts Grants for painting are intended for graduate degree programs, study courses not part of graduate degree programs or extensive in-depth projects to enable applicants to grow professionally. Deadline: 4/1/04. Contact: Alpha Delta Kappa International, 816-363-5525; headquarters@alphadeltakappa.org; http://headquarters@alphadeltakappa.org/Public/Default.htm; http://www.alphadeltakappa.org/Public/painting.htm.

AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY (ACS)
Postdoctoral Fellowships are designed to enable new investigators to qualify for independent careers in cancer research (including basic, preclinical, clinical, psychosocial, behavioral, and epidemiologic research). Deadlines: 4/1/04, 10/15/04. Contact: American Cancer Society, 404-329-7558; grants@cancer.org; http://www.cancer.org/docroot/res/content/res_5_2x_postdoctoral_fellowships.asp?sitearea=res.

CANCER RESEARCH INSTITUTE (CRI)
Postdoctoral Fellowship Program–Support for research to further development of immunological approaches to diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 10/1/04. Contact: Lynne Harmer, 212-688-7515; grants@cancerresearch.org; http://www.cancerresearch.org/postdoc.html.

CASE CANCER FUND, INC., WENDY WILL
Wendy Will Case Cancer Fund Grants–Support primarily for innovative, clinically-related research, though other research areas will be considered. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 10/1/04. Contact: Joan Bentivenga, 312-704-8638; joanb@wwccf.org; http://www.wwccf.org/.

ITTLESON FOUNDATION, INC.
AIDS Grants support new model, pilot, and demonstration efforts that: address needs of underserved, at-risk populations, especially programs recognizing the overlap between such populations; respond to challenges facing community-based AIDS service organizations and organizations addressing systemic change; provide meaningful school-based sex education; make treatment information accessible, available, and easily understandable to those in need of it; and address psycho-social needs of those infected and affected by AIDS, especially adolescents. Contact: Anthony C. Wood, 212-794-2008; http://www.IttlesonFoundation.org/aids.html. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 9/1/04.
Environment Grants support innovative pilot, model, and demonstration projects that will help move individuals, communities, and organizations from environmental awareness to environmental activism by changing attitudes and behaviors. Deadlines and Contact: See above or http://www.IttlesonFoundation.org/enviro.html.
Mental Health Grants provide seed funds for start-up of innovative programs to improve the social welfare of U.S. citizens. Deadlines and Contact: See above or http://www.IttlesonFoundation.org/mental.html.

JOHNSON FOUNDATION, ROBERT WOOD (RWJF)
Investigator Awards in Health Policy Research support projects to interpret, develop, or substantially advance ideas or knowledge that can improve health or health care policy in the U.S. Applications are encouraged from investigators, ranging from those early in their careers to distinguished senior scholars, in diverse fields including economics, sociology, political science, education, anthropology, demography, history, health and social policy, public health, medicine, nursing, genetics, science policy, allied health, law, business, philosophy, ethics, journalism, social work, psychology, engineering and the management sciences. Deadline: 4/1/04. Contact: Lynn Rogut, 732-932-3817; depdir@ihhcpar.rutgers.edu; http://www.ihhcpar.rutgers.edu/rwjf/n.

NATIONAL CENTER ON MINORITY HEALTH AND HEALTH DISPARITIES (NCMHD)
Excellence in Partnerships for Community Outreach, Research on Health Disparities and Training (Centers of Excellence – Resource-Related Research Grants)–Support to augment and strengthen institutional infrastructure and capacity to conduct research (basic, clinical, behavioral, and/or social sciences) aimed at addressing and ultimately eliminating health disparities. Deadlines: 3/19/04 (Letter of Intent); 4/19/04 (Application). Contact: Mireille Kanda, 301-402-1366; Kandam@mail.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MD-04-002.html.

NATIONAL HEART, LUNG AND BLOOD INSTITUTE (NHLBI)
SBIR/STTR Technologies for Monitoring and Performing Resuscitation–Support for research and development of new approaches, tools, methods, devices, and biomaterials to provide bioengineering-based methodologies for monitoring and performing resuscitation. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Suzanne Goldberg, 301-435-0532; goldbergsh@mail.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-059.html.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH (NIMH)
Advanced Centers for Mental Health Disparities Research–Support to enhance established research core infrastructures and investigator-initiated research aimed at understanding and ameliorating mental health disparities. Deadlines: 4/11/04 (Letter of Intent); 5/11/04 (Application). Contact: Michael A. Sesma, 301-443-2847; msesma@mail.nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-04-060.html.

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH)
Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases - SBIR/STTR–Support for research directed at basic understanding of the causes and development of rheumatic diseases, connective tissue diseases, and musculoskeletal and skin disorders and diseases. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Cheryl Kitt, 301-594-2463; kittc@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Balance/Vestibular Program - SBIR/STTR–Support for research and development of treatments for balance disorders; development of neuroimaging techniques and biochemical markers of disease in the vestibular system; development of systems to assess balance/vestibular function and for assessing efficacy of physical rehabilitative regimens for balance disorders. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Lynn E. Luethke, 301-402-3458; luethkel@nidcd.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Behavioral and Social Research Program - SBIR/STTR and Biology of Aging Program - SBIR/STTR–Support for biomedical, behavioral, and social research and research training on the aging process as well as on diseases and other special problems and needs of older people. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Michael-David ARR Kerns, 301-496-9322; kernsm@nia.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.
Bioinformatics - SBIR/STTR–Support to develop software algorithms and database query methods capable of translating natural language questions into appropriate retrievals from multiple related factual databases. Contact: Milton Corn, 301-496-4621; cornm@mail.nlm.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.

Blood Diseases and Resources - SBIR/STTR–Support for research and training in nonmalignant disorders of blood cells and the hematopoietic system. The Blood Resources Program supports research and training in blood and marrow transplantation, thrombosis and hemostasis, and transfusion medicine. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Phyllis Mitchell, 301-435-0481; pm154p@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Corneal Diseases Program - SBIR/STTR–Support for research and development of new therapeutic agents for treatment of corneal diseases; development of innovative methods of drug delivery for ocular surface disorders; development of new biomaterials for corneal prostheses; and development of instruments and procedures for correcting refractive power of the cornea and measuring the cornea’s optical and physiological properties. Contact: Ralph Helmsen, 301-496-5301; rjh@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.

Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases - SBIR/STTR–Support for basic and clinical research on the etiology, pathogenesis, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of diabetes mellitus and its complications; endocrine diseases; osteoporosis; cystic fibrosis, and other metabolic disorders; as well as research on basic endocrine and metabolic processes. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Kristin Abraham, 301-451-8048; abrahamk@extra.niddk.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Diagnostic Assessment of Alcohol Use Disorders and Comorbidity - SBIR/STTR–Support for research on the causes, prevention, control, and treatment of major health problems of alcohol abuse, alcoholism, and alcohol-related problems. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Karen P. Peterson, 301-451-3883; kpeterso@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Digestive Diseases and Nutrition - SBIR/STTR–Support for research on the function, diseases, and disorders of the digestive tract; esophagus, stomach, intestine, colon, anorectum, pancreas, liver, gallbladder, and biliary tract; and basic, clinical, and behavioral research on nutrition and obesity, as well as information transfer in the field of digestive diseases and prevention of obesity. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Frank Hamilton, 301-594-8877; fh14e@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Transplantation (DAIT) - SBIR/STTR–Support for identification and characterization of immune regulation genes and use of this knowledge to potentiate or inhibit immune responses. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Gregory Milman, 301-496-8666; gmilman@niaid.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Division of Cancer Biology - SBIR/STTR–Support for extramural basic and applied research on cancer cell biology and cancer immunology, and cancer etiology, including the effects of biological, chemical, and physical agents in the promotion of cancer. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Connie Dresser, 301-435-2846; cd34b@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences - SBIR/STTR–Support for basic and applied research in the behavioral, social, and population sciences, including epidemiology, biostatistics, and genetics that, independently or in combination with biomedical approaches, reduces cancer risk, incidence, morbidity, and mortality. Contact and Deadlines: See above.

Division of Cancer Prevention - SBIR/STTR–Support for cancer prevention research including chemoprevention, nutritional science, genetic and infectious agents, early detection including biomarker development, and validation and biometry for the institute. Deadlines and Contact: See above.
Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis - SBIR/STTR–Support for clinical cancer treatment research and research conducted in cooperation with other federal agencies with the objective of curing or controlling cancer in man by utilizing treatment modalities singly or in combination; and targeted research and development in the area of drug development. Deadlines and Contact: See above.

Division of Cell Biology and Biophysics - SBIR/STTR–Support for research on membrane synthesis, structure, and function; membrane models; membrane transport; cell division; cell organization; cell motility; and biophysics of proteins, nucleic acids, and biological assemblies, and development of instrumentation, components, and methods for analysis of cellular components and macromolecules by imaging, spectroscopy, and diffraction analysis. Contact: Jean Chin, 301-594-2485; chinj@nigms.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.

Division of Genetics and Developmental Biology—Support for research to develop a better understanding of fundamental processes and mechanisms of development and inheritance in health and disease. Contact: Paul Wolfe, 301-594-0943; wolfep@nigms.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.

Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (DMID) - SBIR/STTR–Support for research on bacterial diseases fungi and fungal diseases, genetics, molecular, and cell biology; medical bacteriology and mycology; microbial structure and function; development of vaccines, drugs, and diagnostics; clinical trials of antibacterial and antifungal agents; and application. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Gregory Milman, 301-496-8666; gmilman@niaid.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Division of Neuroscience and Behavioral Research (DNBR) - SBIR/STTR–Support for research focusing on understanding the mechanisms, characteristics, and processes of drug abuse. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Catherine Sasek, 301-443-6071; csasek@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Division of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry - SBIR/STTR–Support for research related to the actions of therapeutics, including anesthetics, and development of biotechnological methods for their production and investigation. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Peter Preusch, 301-594-5938; preuschp@nigms.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Division of Services and Intervention Research - STTR/SBIR–Support for research, research demonstrations, research training, resource development, and research dissemination in prevention and treatment interventions, services research, clinical epidemiology, and diagnostic and disability assessment. Contact: Enid Light, 301-443-1185; elight@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.
Division of Treatment Research and Development - SBIR/STTR–Support for research aimed at development and testing of pharmacological and behavioral treatments for drug abuse and addiction. Contact: Catherine Sasek, 301-443-6071; csasek@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.
DNA Sequencing - SBIR/STTR–Support for development of innovative technologies and strategies to reduce cost, increase throughput, or improve accuracy of large-scale DNA sequencing of complex genomes. Contact: Bettie J. Graham, 301-496-7531; bg30t@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.

Epidemiology and Clinical Applications - SBIR/STTR–Support for programs in epidemiologic studies, basic and applied behavioral research, demonstration and education research, and projects for disease prevention and health promotion, including large scale clinical trials. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Paula Einhorn, 301-435-0563; einhornp@nhlbi.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications (ELSI) of Genomics and Genetics Research - SBIR/STTR–Support to exam issues surrounding completion of the human DNA sequence and study of human sequence variation raised by integration of genetic technologies and information into health care and public health activities; and integration of knowledge about genomics and gene-environment interactions into nonclinical settings. Contact: Jean E. McEwen, 301-402-4997; jm522n@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and Alcohol-Related Birth Defects - SBIR/STTR–Support for research leading to improved diagnosis and assessment of impairment and disability, as well as development of tools to enhance academic and daily living skills. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Karen P. Peterson, 301-451-3883; kpeterso@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Functional Genomics - SBIR/STTR–Support for development of new or improved technologies for large-scale or genome-wide approaches relating to gene discovery. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Bettie J. Graham, 301-496-7531; bg30t@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology Program - SBIR/STTR–Support for research on prevention, treatment, and diagnosis of clinical problems that occur predominantly among older persons or are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in older people; and investigations of clinical problems associated with nursing homes and other sites of long-term care for frail older persons. Clinical gerontology research focuses primarily on clinically related issues regarding aging, and deals with research on aging changes over the life span. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Michael-David ARR Kerns, 301-496-9322; kernsm@nia.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.
Glaucoma Program - SBIR/STTR–Support for research and development of new therapeutic agents, instruments, and procedures for diagnosis and treatment of glaucoma; development of devices to aid patient’s compliance with therapeutic regimens; and development of non-invasive methods to measure damage to the optic nerve head. Contact: Ralph Helmsen, 301-451-2020; rjh@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.

Hearing Program - SBIR/STTR–Support for research related to hearing aids, cochlear implants, and other assistive devices and to increase utilization of computer and other information technologies, telecommunication devices, and alerting systems for individuals with hearing impairments. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04 12/1/04. Contact: Lynn E. Luethke, 301-402-3458; luethkel@nidcd.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.
Heart and Vascular Diseases - SBIR/STTR–Support for research, clinical trials, and demonstrations relating to causes, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of heart, blood vessel, lung, and blood diseases and sleep disorders. Contact: Rosalie Dunn, 301-435-0505; rd39w@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.

Human Genome Sequence Variation - SBIR/STTR–Support for development of new or improved methods and analytic tools for large-scale identification, scoring, and interpretation of DNA sequence variants. Contact: Bettie J. Graham, 301-496-7531; bg30t@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.
Kidney, Urologic, and Hematologic Diseases - SBIR/STTR–Support for research into basic mechanisms of organ and tissue function and into diseases of the kidney, urologic, and hematologic systems. Contact: Marva Moxey-Mims, 301- 594-7717; mm726k@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.
Lens and Cataract Program - SBIR/STTR–Funding for research and development of therapeutic agents for prevention of cataracts; development of new approaches in post-operative management of cataract surgery; and development of new surgical instruments for cataract extraction and biomaterials for replacement of the natural lens. Contact: Ralph Helmsen, 301-451-2020; rjh@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.

Lung Diseases - SBIR/STTR–Support for basic and clinical research, education, and training related to chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, asthma, cystic fibrosis, control of breathing, bronchiolitis, respiratory neurobiology, sleep, and other adult airway diseases. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Ann Rothgeb, 301-435-0202; ar31t@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Markers of Osteoarthritis - SBIR/STTR–Support for research into appropriate markers of degradative and regenerative processes in osteoarthritis. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Cheryl Kitt, 301-594-2463; kittc@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Measurement of Alcohol Consumption/Impairment - SBIR/STTR–Support for development of new methods for quantitative measurement of alcohol consumption; development of new and more accurate, cost-effective, technological approaches for non-invasive measurement of blood alcohol concentration; and development of novel approaches to measure and quantify alcohol-induced impairment of human performance. Contact: Karen P. Peterson, 301-451-3883; kpeterso@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.
Medical Informatics - SBIR/STTR–Support for research on organization, management, and utilization of health knowledge and information, including innovative computer software and systems to assist changing dimensions of healthcare by developing knowledge bases, information synthesizing mechanisms, decision support systems, and similar modalities. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Milton Corn, 301-496-4621; cornm@mail.nlm.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Muscle Biology, Exercise Physiology, and Sports Medicine - SBIR/STTR–Support for research on skeletal muscle, its diseases and disorders, and its central role in human physiology and exercise. Contact: Cheryl Kitt, 301-594-2463; kittc@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.

National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine - STTR/SBIR–Support for innovative basic, preclinical, and early phase clinical studies that can lead to a commercializable CAM product, including research to develop and validate methods for chemical and biological identification of active ingredients in natural products, their mechanisms of action and interaction, bioavailability, and distribution, and to develop standardized, research-grade natural products. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Shan S. Wong, 301-496-7498; sw196c@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

National Center for Research Resources - STTR/SBIR–Support for critical research technologies and shared resources that underpin research to maintain and improve the health of our nation’s citizens. Contact: Louise Ramm, 301-435-0879; lr34m@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.

National Immunization Program - SBIR–Support for planning, coordinating, directing, and participating in efforts to prevent and reduce illness and premature death through immunization against disease. Contact: Bruce G. Weniger, 404- 639-8779; bgw2@cdc.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke - STTR/SBIR–Support for research on the healthy and diseased brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Thomas Miller, 301-496-1779; tm208y@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Neuroscience and Neuropsychology of Aging Program–Support for research on age-related changes in the brain or nervous system in the context of other age-related changes, including studies on Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias of aging. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Michael-David ARR Kerns, 301-496-9322; kernsm@nia.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

NIMH Center for Mental Health Research on AIDS - STTR/SBIR–Support for basic research, clinical studies, and services delivery research concerning any aspect of behavioral and mental disorders (including HIV prevention and neuro-AIDS research). Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Louis Steinberg, 301-443-6100; Lsteinbe@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Pharmaceutical Development for Alcoholism Treatment - SBIR/STTR–Support for applied and clinical research on pharmacologic agents for use in treatment or medical management of alcoholism, disorders resulting from alcoholism, improvement and refinement of drugs currently available for therapeutic purposes, or drugs suitable for use in basic research studies on alcohol addiction. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Karen P. Peterson, 301-451-3883; kpeterso@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Population Research - SBIR/STTR–Support for research in the reproductive sciences, contraceptive development, and demographic and behavioral sciences. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Louis A. Quatrano, 301-402-4221; lq2n@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Prevention - SBIR/STTR–Support for research on causes, prevention, control, and treatment of the major health problems of alcohol abuse, alcoholism, and alcohol-related problems. Contact: Karen P. Peterson, 301-451-3883; kpeterso@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.

Research for Mothers and Children - SBIR/STTR–Support for research on learning disabilities; cognitive and social development; nutrition and growth; obstetric and pediatric pharmacology; and pediatric, adolescent, and maternal AIDS. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Louis A. Quatrano, 301-402-4221; lq2n@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Research Tools - SBIR/STTR–Support for basic and applied research to develop new or improved technologies and approaches for increasing effectiveness of diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of alcohol-related problems. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Karen P. Peterson, 301-451-3883; kpeterso@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Retinal Diseases Program - SBIR/STTR–Funding for research and development of new therapeutic approaches for ocular inflammatory diseases and to inhibit abnormal proliferation of retinal and choroidal blood vessels and other vascular diseases of the retina. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Ralph Helmsen, 301-451-2020; rjh@nei.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Science Education - SBIR/STTR–Support to supplement in-service education of health professionals and paraprofessionals with respect to their recognition and treatment of alcohol-related medical problems. Contact: Karen P. Peterson, 301-451-3883; kpeterso@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.

Strabismus, Amblyopia, and Visual Processing Program - SBIR/STTR–Support for research to identify and characterize growth factors that facilitate regeneration of visual nerve axons; develop innovative techniques to study factors that facilitate regeneration, and guidance of developing or regenerating nerve fibers. Contact: Ralph Helmsen, 301-451-2020; rjh@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.

Taste and Smell Program - SBIR/STTR–Funding to study the chemical senses of smell and taste to enhance understanding of how individuals communicate with their environment. Contact: Lynn E. Luethke, 301-402-3458; luethkel@nidcd.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.

Training in Alcoholism Assessment and Treatment Techniques - SBIR/STTR–Support to develop educational materials, including computer-based approaches, for training health professionals in the use of various assessment techniques and treatment strategies. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Karen P. Peterson, 301-451-3883; kpeterso@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Treatment of Alcoholism - SBIR/STTR–Support for research on the causes, prevention, control, and treatment of the major health problems of alcohol abuse, alcoholism, and alcohol-related problems. Deadlines and Contact: See above.

Visual Impairment and Its Rehabilitation Program - SBIR/STTR–Support for research and development of instruments and methods to better specify, measure, and categorize residual visual function; and development and evaluation of optical, electronic, and other devices that meet rehabilitative needs of persons who are blind or have low vision. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04. Contact: Ralph Helmsen, 301-451-2020; rjh@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol.

Voice, Speech, and Language Program - SBIR/STTR–Support for research and development of diagnostic measures and intervention strategies for voice, speech, swallowing, and language disorders; development of communication and other assistive devices for individuals with those disorders. Contact: Lynn E. Luethke, 301-402-3458; luethkel@nidcd.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/funding/sbir.htm#sol. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 8/1/04, 12/1/04.

NATIONAL NEUROFIBROMATOSIS FOUNDATION, INC.
Young Investigator Awards are made to graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and young investigators no more than 7 years past completion of their MD/PhD training to allow them to pursue novel ideas or concepts related to national neurofibromatosis. Deadline: 4/1/04. Contact: National Neurofibromatosis Foundation, 212-344-6633; jmedina@nf.org; http://www.nf.org/research/yia_forms.htm.

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF)
Advanced Technological Education–Support for improvement in technological education at the undergraduate and secondary school levels through curriculum development; preparation and professional development of college faculty and secondary school teachers; internships and field experiences for faculty, teachers, and students; and other activities. Deadlines: 4/21/04 (Preliminary Proposal); 10/8/04 (Full Proposal). Contact: Elizabeth J Teles, 703-292-4643; ejteles@nsf.gov; http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2004/nsf04541/nsf04541.htm.

Interdisciplinary Training for Undergraduates in Biological and Mathematical Sciences–Support to enhance undergraduate education and training at the intersection of the biological and mathematical sciences and better prepare undergraduate biology or mathematics students to pursue graduate study and careers in fields that integrate the mathematical and biological sciences. Deadline: 4/26/04. Contact: Samuel M. Scheiner, 703-292-8481; sscheine@nsf.gov; http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2004/nsf04546/nsf04546.htm.

Mathematical Social and Behavioral Sciences (MSBS): Facilitating Research Interactions Between the Mathematical and Statistical Sciences and the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences–Support to further understanding of social and/or behavioral science phenomena and address a topic of interest to the mathematical sciences. Proposals for workshops or symposia that foster the interaction of social, behavioral, and/or economic scientists with mathematicians and/or statisticians also are welcome. Deadline: 4/30/04. Contact: Cheryl L. Eavey, 703-292-7269; ceavey@nsf.gov; http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2004/nsf04548/nsf04548.htm.

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF)/ DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE)
Cooperative Activity with Department of Energy Programs for Education and Human Resource Development—PIs of NSF awards managed by one of the NSF programs serving STEM education that often has participation by faculty, undergraduate students and/or pre-service teachers (see list in the complete announcement at the website given below) are invited to participate in a cooperative effort between NSF and the DOE Office of Science. NSF will support students and faculty from participating NSF projects (see list in complete announcement) who are accepted as participants in one of four DOE initiatives that provide hands-on research opportunities in DOE national laboratories during the summer. Contact: http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2004/nsf04547/nsf04547.htm. Deadline: 3/30/2004.

PARKINSON’S DISEASE FOUNDATION
Named Postdoctoral Fellowships are available for up to two years for medical professionals interested in conducting research related to Parkinson’s Disease. Deadline: 4/1/04. Contact: Executive Director, 212-923-4700; info@pdf.org; http://www.pdf.org/AboutPDF/fellowship.cfm.

REEVE PARALYSIS FOUNDATION, CHRISTOPHER (CRPF)
Health Promotion Grants and Quality of Life Grants are awarded for projects to address the needs of people living with paralysis caused by spinal cord injuries and other injuries, diseases and birth defects, including (but not limited to) stroke, spina bifida, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Fields of interest include children, arts, sports/recreation, education, advocacy, accessibility, practical service/needs, independent living, assistive technology, therapeutic riding, employment and counseling. Contact: Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation, 1-800-539-7309; info@paralysis.org; http://www.christopherreeve.org/qlgrants/qlgrantsmain.cfm. Deadlines: 4/1/04, 10/1/04.

STATE FARM COMPANIES FOUNDATION
Doctoral Dissertation Awards are made to candidates whose dissertation topics relate to insurance and risk management or business. Deadline: 3/31/04. Contact: State Farm Companies Foundation, 309-766-2161; beth.leuck.gan1@statefarm.com; http://www.statefarm.com/foundati/doctoral.htm.

— Will Gosnold, interim director, research and program development.

 
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UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is also available electronically online at http://www.und.edu/dept/our/uletter. All articles submitted for publication should be labeled “University Letter” and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu or Fax to 777-4616. Attachments to University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number. University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations, Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.

UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

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