University Letter

Volume 39, Number 25: February 22, 2002

 

Tickets Still Available For Founders Day

Faculty, Students Invited To Forum On Academic Life

Center For Innovation Inducts Awardees Feb. 21

NASA Astronaut Speaks Friday

“Disaster As A Political Variable” Is Feb. 26 Faculty Lecture Series Talk

EVENTS TO NOTE

Tech Expo Set For Thursday

Philosophy And Religion Plans Colloquium

Biology Faculty Candidates Will Present Seminars

Master Chorale Sings World Folk Music Sunday

Graduate Committee Meets Monday

Women’s Center Lists Events

Speaker Presents “Who Was Martin Luther King?”

Conflict, Change And Civility Are Topics At Theology For Lunch Program

Germans From Russia Demonstrate Plachindla Feb. 26

History Department Holds Black History Month Discussion

Study Abroad Sessions Set For Wednesdays

Faculty Concert Spotlights “The Art Of War”

International Centre Hosts Thursday Cultural Programs

Everyone Invited To English Lecture Series

Annual Key Inventory Meeting Set For Feb. 28

UND Musicians Take Part In Intercollegiate Honor Band

Wind Ensemble, University Band Present Concert March 5

Economic Development Summit Scheduled For March 14

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Schauer Named Acting Chair Of Family Medicine

Writers Conference Seeks Donations

Upcoming U2 Workshops Listed

Studio One Lists Program Schedule

Please Recycle Cardboard

Denim Day Is Last Wednesday Of Month

Dak-Minn Blood Bank Thanks UND For Support

 

IN REMEMBRANCE

Remembering William Barney

 

GRANTS AND RESEARCH

Summer Research Professors Appointed

Faculty Receive Summer Instructional Development Fellowships

Research, Grant Opportunities Listed

 

Tickets Still Available For Founders Day

Tickets are still available for the annual Founders Day banquet Thursday, Feb. 28, in the Memorial Union Ballroom. The pre-banquet social will begin at 5:45 p.m. with musical entertainment beginning at 6 p.m. The banquet will begin at 6:30 p.m.

The Founders Day program will recognize faculty and staff with 25 years of service to UND. Retired and retiring faculty and staff with 15 or more years of service to the University will also be honored. Awards for outstanding teaching, research, and service will be presented to faculty members and departments.

Honorees who will take part in the program are:
Retirees: Richard Ganyo (Printing Center), Cec Kryzsko (Dining Services), Elmer Morlock (Computer Center), Darline Pokrzywinski (Dining Services), Douglas Winkler (Facilities).

25-year Honorees: Janet Ahler (Educational Foundations and Research), Karen Berthold (Continuing Education), Mary Butzin (School of Communication), April Byars (Health Sciences Library), Betty Dacar (Family Practice-Bismarck), Byron Danielson (Internal Medicine), Sharon Fields (Educational Leadership), Yvonne Hanley (Teaching and Learning), Ursula Hovet (English), Beverly Johnson (Physical Therapy), Stanley Johnson (Acquisitions), Robert Kweit (Political Science), David Lambeth (Biochemistry), James Laturnus (Facilities), James Liebelt (Facilities), Renee Mabey (Physical Therapy), Mary Nygord (Dining Services), Mark Oertwich (Facilities), Linda Palmiscno (Student Health), Michael Poellot (Atmospheric Sciences), Kaaren Pupino (Thormodsgard Law Library), Cindy Purpur (Geography), Celia Rosencrans (Center for Innovation), Susan Shaft (Office of the Registrar), William Sheridan (Biology), Mike Skiple (Facilities), Mary Clare Smith (Family Practice-Bismarck), Karen Speaker (Human Nutrition Research Center), Connie Strand (Harley E. French Library), Kent Streibel (Aviation), Raymond Tozer (Facilities), Vicki Von Harz (Purchasing), Carmen Williams (Office of the Registrar), Cadence Youngberg (Engineering and Mines).

Fred Wittmann, Office of the Vice President for Student and Outreach Services.

 

Faculty, Students Invited To Forum On Academic Life

The Graduate School invites you to participate in a campus-wide forum on academic life Friday through Tuesday, March 1-5, at the Memorial Union. The forum will provide a rare opportunity for the entire academic side of UND — faculty and students, graduates and undergraduates — to celebrate the work and accomplishments of a vigorous intellectual community, and to reaffirm the importance of our common enterprise.

On Friday, the theme will be “The World and the Academy.” Sessions will examine the challenges as well as the possibilities ahead for the academy. The issues include the impact of larger social and political spheres on the values a university can/should uphold, and the changing idea of what a university should be.

Speakers include: Martha Meek (English), John Ettling (vice president for academic affairs and provost), Joseph Benoit (dean, graduate school), James Grijalva (law), Sherri O’Donnell (English), Katrina Meyer (educational leadership), and Jack Weinstein (philosophy and religion).

The vital question for us is, can we at UND, not far from the “outside world,” find a responsible balance in our commitments? Sessions will feature a faculty panel and a case study inviting the active participation of everyone attending. Also on Friday, the dean of students office will conduct a student-centered workshop, principally for undergraduates, to discuss integrity issues on campus.

On Monday and Tuesday, the forum will showcase the achievements of faculty and students across the entire spectrum of scholarly research interests at UND. Activities will feature poster presentations, oral presentations, musical performances, art exhibitions, and readings. A table will also be made available for students and faculty to display their recent publications.

A noon luncheon will be held Friday; those planning to attend should RSVP to Staci Matheny at 777-2786 or staci_matheny@mail.und.nodak.edu. – Martha Meek (English).

 

Center For Innovation Inducts Awardees Feb. 21

The Center for Innovation will induct Sally Wold Smith and David “White Thunder” Trottier as Business Innovators of the Year and name the late Croil Hunter into the North Dakota Entrepreneur Hall of Fame. The ceremony will begin with a 6 p.m. reception Thursday, Feb. 21, in the Rural Technology Center, with a 6:45 dinner at the Ramada Inn.

Sally Wold Smith, President and CEO of Minneapolis-based Buffalo Wild Wings International, Inc., is one of a few female CEOs in the restaurant industry. She oversees an emerging 160-unit Buffalo Wild Wings Grill and Bar restaurant empire that stretches across 26 states and 74 markets and posted systemwide sales of more than $220 million in 2001. Smith is a native of Grand Forks and aUND graduate.

David “White Thunder” Trottier, CEO, Chiptronics, Inc., is a member of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe who graduated from Mayville State University in 1977. Trottier joined Chiptronics in 1992, after extensive business experience with Devils Lake Sioux Manufacturing Corporation, International Paper Company, Sterling Drug, Inc., Turtle Mountain Manufacturing and Sioux Manufacturing. Trottier has led his company’s growth from sales of $7 in 1992 to $40 million in 2001. Chiptronics has also been honored as an outstanding supplier to 3M and was nominated for National Indian Business of the Year award in 1997.

Croil Hunter served as the second president of Northwest Airlines from 1937 to 1953 and served as chairman of the board until 1965. Born in Casselton, Hunter is credited with piloting the major growth of the airline. Under his leadership, Northwest expanded from a local air mail carrier into a transcontinental, overseas and international air passenger network. He is credited with pioneering new equipment in the 1930s, establishing an extensive route structure and expanding to a national airline and establishing coach fares in 1952.

The North Dakota Entrepreneur Hall of Fame was established in 1986 by the Center for Innovation to recognize North Dakota entrepreneurs and inventors for their contributions to the state and nation.

These people built and created products, processes, technologies, businesses and organizations. They solved problems and invented new concepts. By doing so, they contributed immeasurably to our higher standard of living, our economy, and our general well-being as they enjoyed professional success.

The North Dakota Business Innovator of the Year Award recognizes North Dakota’s entrepreneurs who are discovering new and better ways of serving their customers, changing the way business is done, exploring new frontiers and building through excellence.

The innovators are leaders who are enhancing productivity, competitiveness, growth and diversity of our state’s and nation’s economy. The award recognizes recent innovative and entrepreneurial achievements.

Please join us in honoring our 2002 inductees to the North Dakota Entrepreneur Hall of Fame and Business Innovator of the Year. The event is sponsored by Northwest Airlines and Alerus Financial. Tickets are $20; call 777-3132.

 

NASA Astronaut Speaks Friday

The public is invited to hear Bonnie Dunbar, NASA astronaut, present “From Apollo Into the New Millenium” at noon Friday, Feb. 22, in 210 Clifford Hall. A veteran of five NASA space flights, Dr. Dunbar has logged more than 50 days in space. She is also an experienced private pilot. She currently serves as deputy director for University Affairs at Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas. – Karen Katrinak, Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium.

 

“Disaster As A Political Variable” Is Feb. 26 Faculty Lecture Series Talk

“Disaster as a Political Variable” is the next talk in the faculty lecture series. Mary Grisez Kweit (Political Science) will give the lecture Tuesday, Feb. 26, at 4:30 p.m. in the Fred Orth Lecture Bowl of the Memorial Union. A reception begins at 4 p.m., and a question and answer period will follow the talk.

Mary Grisez Kweit

Chair and professor of political science and public administration, Dr. Kweit’s research has focused on the impact of participation on local government. A member of Phi Beta Kappa, she received both the M.A. and the Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to joining UND’s faculty in 1977, she taught at the University of Pennsylvania, Glassboro State College, the College of William and Mary, and the University of Virginia.

Kweit was chosen as a UND summer research professor in 1980 and 1984, and has received many other honors and awards. In 1998, she was elected to a three-year term on the executive council of the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. Kweit has written a number of articles in scholarly journals and has co-authored a number of books: Concepts and Methods of Political Analysis, Implementing Citizen Participation in a Bureaucratic Society, Public Budgeting, and two editions of People and Politics in Urban America. She has teaching expertise in political behavior, concepts and methods, and American government with a focus on Congress and the Presidency.

Kweit also served half-time as director of international academic affairs from 1990 to 1995, and as the chair of the department of political science and public administration from 1996 to 1998.

The last lecture in the faculty series will be Tuesday, April 9, when Robert W. Lewis, Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor of English Emeritus talks about “Life with Hemingway, or, Riding Papa’s Coattails on the Academic Express.”

 

Events to Note

Tech Expo Set For Thursday

The Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies is hosting the second annual Tech Expo Thursday, Feb. 21, from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union, Red River Valley Room. The Tech Expo provides a showcase of classroom presentation tools.

Technology firms from the region will set up exhibits and demonstrations to update faculty, staff and students on today’s latest presentation technologies. Featured displays include LCD projectors, interactive white boards, A/V switchers and controllers, digital document cameras and more. Vendors who will be present to talk about hardware and software include Apple Computer, Minneapolis; Unitech Contracting, Grand Forks; Computerland, Grand Forks; Pratt Audio Visual, Huron, S.D.; Crestron, Inc., Arlington Heights, Ill.; Troxell, St. Paul; and Tierney Brothers, Minneapolis.

UND faculty will present TECH BYTES, 30-minute sessions throughout the day focusing on their use of technology in instruction. The TECH BYTES schedule includes the College of Education and Human Development, College of Nursing, John D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, College of Business and Public Administration, and the School of Engineering and Mines.

UND offices participating include the Chester Fritz Library, Division of Continuing Education, Disability Support Services, and Information Technology Systems and Services.

Come learn and have fun! Admission is free and open to all faculty, staff, students and the public. For further information, call 777-6325. – Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies.

 

Philosophy And Religion Plans Colloquium

The department of philosophy and religion will hold a colloquium, “Queer as Black-Folk: Mama Juju Speaks God-Talk to Her ‘White Chil,’” at 4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 21, in 138 Abbott Hall. Gayle Baldwin (Philosophy and Religion) will present. For more information, check out our complete colloquium schedule at: http://www.und.edu/dept/philrel/ or contact me. – Jack Russell Weinstein, Department of Philosophy and Religion, 777-2887, jack.weinstein@und.nodak.edu.

 

Biology Faculty Candidates Will Present Seminars

Andrew Turner, biology department faculty candidate, will present a seminar titled “Trait-Mediated Indirect Interactions in the Littoral Food Web: Why Phenotypic Plasticity Matters to a Community Ecologist,” at noon Friday, Feb. 22, in 141 Starcher Hall. Dr. Turner earned his undergraduate degree from Wittenberg University, Springfield, Ohio, in 1985. He earned his M.S. from Ohio State University in 1987 and his Ph.D. from Michigan State University in 1994. For two years he did post-doctoral research in the Florida Everglades, and in 1997 he accepted a faculty position at Clarion University in Pennsylvania. His research is currently based at the Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology in Pennsylvania.

Sarah Goslee, another biology department faculty candidate, will present a seminar titled “Spatial Processes and Plant Community Assembly (Or, Why is That Growing There?)” at noon Monday, Feb. 25, in 141 Starcher Hall. Dr. Goslee earned her undergraduate degree from Connecticut College in 1992. She earned an M.S. in ecology from Pennsylvania State University in 1994, and a Ph.D. from Duke University in 1998. Dr. Goslee’s research experience is in plant community ecology and vegetation dynamics in ecosystems ranging from the Florida Everglades to the Chihuahuan Desert, although she is most familiar with the forest and wetland communities of the eastern United States.

Everyone is welcome to attend both seminars. – Department of Biology.

 

Master Chorale Sings World Folk Music Sunday

The Grand Forks Master Chorale presents “Folk Music of the World” at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 24, at United Lutheran Church, 324 Chestnut St., Grand Forks. The East Grand Forks senior high choir will perform as special guests.

Music plays an important role in our lives, giving us a cultural identity. By exploring the music of the world’s different cultures, we can “tour” and know better the riches they have to share with us. Director Nolan Long invites you on such a musical tour as we present a concert of folk music from all corners of the globe.

From Bela Bartok’s Czechoslovkia to the rugged coasts of Newfoundland and Scandinavia, to the North American prairie, the Master Chorale is proud to present the unique folk music sounds that give a “sense of place” to the diverse regions people call home. With our special guests the East Grand Forks Senior High Choir, we are sure you’ll enjoy this trip through the geography of sound.

The Grand Forks Master Chorale is one of the region’s premier vocal ensembles. Founded in 1983, the mission of the chorale is to present and provide choral music of the highest caliber to the region. In recent years the chorale has performed in diverse venues, including performances with the Winnipeg Symphony and as a featured choral ensemble for the Continental Harmony Project. This year, the chorale will perform several concerts, including appearances with the Greater Grand Forks Symphony and at the rededication of St. Mary’s Church at the Richardton (N.D.) Abbey.

Advance tickets for general admission are $10, reserved seats are $12. Tickets at the door are general admission only, $12 and students $6. Reserve tickets by calling 777-3376.

For more information contact Nolan Long, Director of Choirs, 777-2814, nolan.long@und.nodak.edu or Jon Jackson (Anatomy and Cell Biology), 777-4911 jackson@medicine.nodak.edu.

 

Graduate Committee Meets Monday

The Graduate Committee will meet Monday, Feb. 25, from 3:05 to 5 p.m. in 305 Twamley Hall. The agenda will include:

1. Approval of minutes from Feb. 11.

2. Request for the following course changes in communication sciences and disorders: 1) Change in course description of CSD 501 to include CSD 501.04-Seminar; 2) Change in course title and course description of CSD 532 - Adult Neurogenic Communication Disorders to CSD 532 - Neurogenic Communication Disorders I; 3) Change in title and course description of CSD 542 - Child Neurogenic Communication Disorders to CSD 542 - Neurogenic Communication Disorders II; 4) Change in title and course description of CSD 552 - Motor Speech Disorders to CSD 552 - Neurogenic Communication Disorders III.

3. Request for two new courses for theatre arts: 1) THEA 503 - Dramatic Theory and Criticism I and; 2) THEA 504 - Dramatic Theory and Criticism II.

4. Change in program requirements for the Master of Science (non-thesis) in chemistry.

5. Overview of incomplete policy.

6. The dept. of pharmacology, physiology, and therapeutics requests a change of program title for the (1) pharmacology and toxicology program and (2) physiology program to pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics and a prefix change from PHY to PPT. The department of pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics requests the following course changes: PPT. 501, replaces PHTX 501; PPT 502, replaces PHY 502; PPT 503, replaces PHY 503; PPT 505 replaces PHY 505; PPT 511 replaces PHTX 511; PPT 512 replaces PHTX 512; PPT 521 replaces PHY 521 and PHYTX 521; PPT 523 replaces PHY 523; PPT 525 replaces PHY 525; PPT 526 replaces PHY 526; PPT 527 replaces PHY 527; PPT 528 replaces PHY 528, PPT 529 replaces PHY 529; PPT 590 replaces PHY 590 and PHTX 590, PPT 999 replaces PHTX 999; PPT 591 replaces PHY 591; PPT 996 replaces PHTX 996; PPT 998 replaces PHTX 998. The department also requests the following three new courses: PPT 530 Advanced Neurochemistry; PPT 535 Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Disorders; PPT 540 Molecular Neuropharmacology.

7. Request for new certificate program from the department of geography: certificate in geographic information sciences.

8. Physical therapy program is requesting that the GRE not be a requirement for the current program.

9. Report from the constitution revision committee chair, Barry Milavetz.

10. Matters arising.

Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School.

 

Women’s Center Lists Events

The Women’s Center will hold a Meet and Eat program at noon Monday, Feb. 25. Women from the Grand Forks Air Force Base will hold a fashion show showcasing a variety of clothing styles from various cultural backgrounds. Lunch will be provided.

March is National Women’s History Month. The theme is “Women’s History - My History”; please join us Friday, March 1, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for the following events at Barnes and Noble Bookstore: 10 to 11 a.m., Janet Smith, local author, will share a reading from her book, “My Dear Phebe,” a novel based on the letters by her ancestor who was a girl during the Civil War; 11 to 11:30 a.m., the play, “Womanspeak”; 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., “Women at UND: Historical Walking Tour” presentation by Amber Bryant. This is the unveiling of a new walking tour that honors the legacy and contribution of women who have worked and studied at UND; 12:30 to 1:30 p.m., “Living History” presented by senior lecturer Kathy King’s Introduction to the Study of Women class.

Starbuck’s coffee and cookies will be served. Women’s History Month merchandise will be available for purchase. – Patty McIntyre, Women’s Center, 777-4300.


Speaker Presents “Who Was Martin Luther King?”

The Multicultural Awareness Committee (MAC) will mark Black History Month with Bryan Barrows, who will present “Who was Martin Luther King?” at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 26, in the International Centre, 2908 University Ave. Barrows, who has performed at colleges across America, will bring us up-to-date on African American history, starting in the early 1960s. – Jeanine Garner, Publicity Chair, Multicultural Awareness Committee.

 

Conflict, Change And Civility Are Topics At Theology For Lunch Program

The Campus Ministry Association and the Conflict Resolution Center are co-sponsoring the February series of Theology for Lunch, focusing on conversations about conflict, change, and civility. Tom Fuchs and Linda Hendrikson of the Conflict Resolution Center will lead the discussion. A free meal is provided each week. The final session will begin at 12:10 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 26, in the Christus Rex Lutheran Campus Center, across University Avenue from the Chester Fritz Library. Additional information may be obtained from any of the Campus Ministry Association members: Christus Rex, Newman Catholic Center, Wittenberg Lutheran Chapel, and United Campus Ministry. – Jerry Bass, United Campus Ministry.


Germans From Russia Demonstrate Plachindla Feb. 26

The Germans from Russia Heritage Society will host a hands-on presentation on preparing plachindla or pumpkin tarts, Tuesday, Feb. 26, a 6:30 p.m. in the First Presbyterian Church, 5555 South Washington Street.

Luella Boyer learned to enjoy and to prepare plachindla as a girl. She bakes for a hobby and will lead the session. Please call her at 772-3187 or Arlene Herzog at 772-1895 before Saturday, Feb. 23, to let them know that you plan to attend or for more information. A “count” is needed to provide enough ingredients for all. If a ride is needed, call 775-4739.

The refreshment hosts at this Lenten lesson are Marion and Milt Kinzler and Eunice and Peter Kuhn. Milt Kinzler will cook and bring a pot of homemade knoepfla suppe, a German-Russian specialty soup and staple.

After the baking and tasting, the video program, “Schmeckfest: Food Traditions of the Germans from Russia,” will be shown.

This presentation is free and open to the public. The sponsors are the Deutsche Kinder, the members of the Greater Grand Forks Chapter of the Germans from Russia Heritage Society. Anyone interested in this topic or in the German-Russian American heritage is welcome to participate. – Herbert Boswau, Associate Professor Emeritus of Languages.

 

History Department Holds Black History Month Discussion

The department of history will sponsor a brown bag lunch symposium at noon Wednesday, Feb. 27, in 217 Merrifield Hall. Eric Burin (History) will offer a short talk, “Slave Families and the Failure of Antislavery Activity in the South,” which will be followed by a general discussion. Students, staff, and faculty are all welcome to attend. – Department of History.

 

Study Abroad Sessions Set For Wednesdays

Study Abroad sessions will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesdays in the International Centre, 2908 University Ave. The Feb. 27 session will spotlight study in Costa Rica. The study abroad information sessions are open to students, faculty, staff, and parents. They are intended to educate the UND community on study abroad exchanges/programs. – Office of International Programs, 777-4231.

 

Faculty Concert Spotlights “The Art Of War”

Five faculty members from the department of music will present a chamber recital, “The Art of War,” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 28, at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 319 South Fifth St. The concert will be repeated at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 7, at the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Crookston, Minn. It will feature music inspired by armed conflict, with compositions ranging in date from 1638 to 1996.

Performers include Humberto Almeida, piano; Christopher Anderson, organ; Royce Blackburn, baritone; Therese Costes, soprano; and Elizabeth Rheude, clarinet. They will perform works by Olivier Messiaen, Charles Ives, Claudio Monteverdi, Melissa Hui, Paul Sifler and Jehan Alain.

Admission is $5 for general admission, and $3 for students. For further information, please contact Elizabeth Rheude at 777-2823 or Therese Costes at 777-2828, at the department of music. – Department of Music.

 

International Centre Hosts Thursday Cultural Programs

The International Centre will host cultural programs at 7 p.m. Thursdays in the Centre, 2908 University Ave. The Feb. 28 program will feature Kyrgystan. Everyone is invited. – Office of International Programs, 777-4231.

 

Everyone Invited To English Lecture Series

The English department lecture series, held at 4 p.m. in 116 Merrifield Hall, continues Thursday, Feb. 28. Lori Robison will present “An ‘Imperceptible Infusion’ of Blood: Sentimental Discourse and the Reinscription of Race in Iola Leroy.” – Kathleen Dixon, English.

 

Annual Key Inventory Meeting Set For Feb. 28

The annual key inventory meeting will be held Thursday, Feb. 28, at 9 a.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. The person responsible for key inventories in each department should attend. Your inventory list and other pertinent information will be handed out at that meeting. There will be time for questions and answers, led by Larry Zitzow (director of facilities) and Guy Kain (lock shop supervisor). – Facilities Department.

 

UND Musicians Take Part In Intercollegiate Honor Band

The Jamestown College Music Department will host the first annual North Dakota intercollegiate honor band Friday and Saturday, March 1 and 2. The 90-member band consists of students from 11 universities and colleges in North Dakota including Bismarck State College, Bottineau State College, Dickinson State University, Jamestown College, Minot State University, North Dakota State School of Science, North Dakota State University, Trinity Bible College, University of Mary, University of North Dakota, and Valley City State University.

The honor band will meet March 1-2 under the direction of guest conductor Thomas Dvorak, director of bands at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. A 7:30 p.m. concert will be held Saturday, March 2, in the Jamestown College DeNault Auditorium located in the Reiland Fine Arts Center on the Jamestown College campus. Admission is $4.

Seven University of North Dakota musicians from the UND Wind Ensemble will participate in the Intercollegiate Honor Band: Christen Baehr, flute; Seth Custer, alto saxophone; Lynn Gehrke, flute; Lew Krec, euphonium; Rea Reterrath, bass clarinet; Amanda Smallbeck, piccolo; and Pamela Zalec, clarinet.

For additional information concerning this performance, please contact the UND band department at 777-2815. – James Popejoy, Director of Bands.

 

Wind Ensemble, University Band Present Concert March 5

The UND Wind Ensemble and University Band, conducted by James Popejoy, will present a concert at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 5, at the Empire Arts Center in Grand Forks. Tickets, available at the door, are $5 for general admission and $3 for students.

The wind ensemble will open their portion of the program with Clifton William’s “Fanfare and Allegro,” followed by the “Medieval Suite” of Ron Nelson. Seth Custer, a junior music performance major from East Grand Forks, will be the featured soloist on Frank Bencriscutto’s “Serenade for Alto Saxophone and Band.” Robert Brooks, associate director of bands, will guest-conduct Johan de Meij’s “Gandalf” from his award-winning Symphony No. 1 - “The Lord of the Rings.” The wind ensemble will close the concert with a performance of a new work by Frank Felice, “Sleight of Band.” Felice, an assistant professor of composition at Butler University in Indiana, will be in residence at UND March 4 and 5, where he will present master classes and work with composition students.

The University Band will open the concert with Jaime Texidor’s classic “Amparito Roco.” Also on their program will be Clare Grundman’s “Concord,” and “Serenade” by European composer Derek Bourgeois. The band will close their program with a new composition by David Shaffer titled “New World Variations,” based on a famous theme from the new World Symphony of Dvorak.

For additional information concerning this performance, please contact the band department at 777-2815. – James Popejoy, Director of Bands.

 

Economic Development Summit Scheduled For March 14

The Grand Forks Region Economic Development Corporation (EDC) will host its economic development summit from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Thursday, March 14, in the north ballroom, Alerus Center. Gerald Groenewold, director of the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), will be the featured speaker.

Dr. Groenewold manages a multidisciplinary science and engineering research team of approximately 230 people who focus on research, development, demonstration and commercialization of energy and environmental technologies. Since being named director in 1987, Dr. Groenewold has transformed the EERC into a practical, market-driven organization with national and international clientele, emphasizing joint venture partnerships between government, industry and the research community. During the past decade, the EERC has had contracts with over 650 clients from 47 countries and 49 states, including many Fortune 500 companies.

“We are extremely pleased that Dr. Groenewold has accepted our invitation,” Mark Krauseneck, Grand Forks Region EDC President and CEO, said. “Under his leadership, the EERC has aggressively created a tremendous number of new opportunities for commercial and governmental partners. The EERC adds significant economic and social value to their clients’ work and to the lives of all of us. The EERC has achieved their much-deserved success in a rapidly changing and highly competitive global market, and they are perfectly positioned to provide many of the vital answers to the critical question of how to thrive in a post 9/11 world. They represent an extremely important local, domestic and international resource. Gerry and the entire EERC team are invaluable partners of the EDC.”

Building off of a long tradition of fossil fuel-related research and development, the EERC has broadened its scope to include wind energy; biomass and other alternative fuels; advanced air pollution control technologies, emphasizing air toxics and fine particulates; water management; nuclear weapons site cleanup; the development of state-of-the-art analytical and cleanup techniques for air, soil and water; energy efficiency; and flood prevention.

Tickets are $20 in advance, $25 at the door. Please RSVP by Friday, March 8. For further information, please contact the EDC office at 746-2720. – Jan Orvik, Editor, for Grand Forks Region Economic Development Corp.

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Schauer Named Acting Chair Of Family Medicine

Roger Schauer has been named acting chair of the department of family medicine, effective March 1.

Dr. Schauer will replace William Mann, who announced his decision to resign last month. Mann, appointed chair in 1996, will continue in his role as associate professor, teaching and providing patient care at the UND Family Practice Center.

A committee representing the school’s constituencies throughout the state will conduct the search for a new chair. The group is headed by Bruce Pitts, associate dean for the school’s southeast campus, based in Fargo.

Schauer, who practiced family medicine for 18 years in Hettinger, is a 1969 alumnus of the UND School of Medicine. Originally from Wishek, he is board-certified by the American Academy of Family Physicians. He joined the school in 1991 as an assistant professor.

An associate professor and director of pre-doctoral medical education in the department of family medicine, he has been active in the development of the ROME program whereby third-year medical students gain experience in rural practice. In 1990, he was named North Dakota Family Physician of the Year by the North Dakota Academy of Family Physicians.

H. David Wilson, School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

 

Writers Conference Seeks Donations

Since its beginning 33 years ago, the annual Writers Conference has been underwritten by the University and supported by grants and contributions. And it is free! Good will contributions are accepted, but have never been solicited with any sustained campaign. Recently, donations have lagged. This year’s conference expenses will be met. However, without new contributors, future conferences – at least with the same caliber we all take for granted – are in jeopardy.

Your contribution to operating expenses helps with immediate costs, or your contribution to the endowment fund ensures the long-term availability of interest money that can then be used on a yearly basis.

We are appealing to you to be as generous as the organizers of this conference have been (John Little, Jim McKenzie, Bob King and Jay Meek) in bring a conference of such high distinction to UND, and to help the Writers Conference to continue. We hope you will consider sending a donation to the Writers Conference, UND Foundation, P.O. Box 8157, Grand Forks, ND 58202. Thank you for your consideration. – Margaret Zidon, Department of Teaching and Learning, and Tami Carmichael, Integrated Studies Program.

 

Upcoming U2 Workshops Listed

Following are workshops offered through the University Within the University (U2 program). Check out the listings for many learning opportunities.

Connections for March, April, and May is now online! To view and register online, go to www.conted.und.edu/U2. You should receive your paper copy of Connections by the end of this week.

NDPERS Pre-Retirement Education Program (target audience is NDPERS employees age 55 and up), April 16, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., River Valley Room, Memorial Union.

Registration for this workshop must be completed by March 5. Fee is $15 for materials. This workshop is intended to be pre-retirement education geared to assisting long-term employees and spouses in planning for a successful life after leaving state employment. It is impossible to plan the future for employees. However, the goal of pre-retirement education is to provide the tools necessary to plan for oneself. Topics of discussion will be financial planning, social security, NDPERS benefits and retiree health credit, Dakota plan health, dental, long term care insurance and legal concerns. Participants will be asked to complete a benefit estimate form prior to attending the workshop. Presenter: NDPERS staff.

ACCOUNTING SERVICES

Employee and Non-Employee Travel Policies and Procedures, Food Purchase Approvals, March 7, 9 to 11 a.m., River Valley Room, Memorial Union. Brush up on the procedures to follow for out-of-state travel authorizations, American Express corporate cards, employee travel-expense vouchers and non-employee ticket authorizations.Presenters: Mike Grosz, Dining Services; Lisa Heher, Accounting Services; Bonnie Nerby, Accounting Services; Allison Peyton, Accounting Services.

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS AND SERVICES

ITSS classes are held in 361 Upson II, and require a working knowledge of Windows or a Windows class. Enrollment is limited to 12 in most cases. A $10 manual is optional for Access Levels II and all Word classes. Instructors: Tracy Uhlir, GroupWise; Jim Malins, all other classes.

Access 00, Level II: March 4, 6 and 8, 9 to 11:45 a.m. (eight hours total). Prerequisite: Access 00, Level I. Link and manage databases; use advanced tables, queries, forms, and reports; develop informal relationships through queries, create subforms and subreports.

GroupWise 5.5, E-Mail: March 5, 9 to 11 a.m. Find out how to compose e-mail, add attachments, use the address book, customize GroupWise, and handle mail.

Word 00, Level I: March 5, 6, and 7, 1:30 to 4:15 p.m. (eight hours total). Learn basic features of the program; edit and format multiple documents, create headers and footers, set page numbers and tab stops.

GroupWise 5.5 Calendar: March 7, 9 to 11 a.m. An understanding of GroupWise 5.5: E-Mail is recommended before taking this workshop. Learn how to schedule appointments and recurring events, look at someone else’s calendar, create folders, and archive your mail.

SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH

Shipping and Receiving Hazardous Materials: March 5, 10 a.m. to noon, 211 Rural Technology Center. Understand your responsibilities if you ship or receive hazardous material. If you fill out paperwork for a package, put material in a package, hand a package to a delivery person, receive a package from a delivery person, or open a package containing hazardous material, then you must have this training. Presenter: Greg Krause, Safety and Environmental Health.

Preventing Workplace Violence: March 7, 10 a.m. to noon, Room 17, Swanson Hall. Workplace violence occurs all too often. Communication and training can help prevent and deal with employee and/or client violence. This course will identify underlying causes of workplace violence, warning signs, methods for heading off serious situations, and planning for prevention. Presenters: Duane Czapiewski, UND Police and Jason Uhlir, Safety and Environmental Health.

HOW TO REGISTER: Registering for U2 workshops is easy! Contact Amy Noeldner at the University Within the University office by phone, 777-2128, fax, 777-2140, e-mail, U2@mail.und.nodak.edu, or mail to Box 7131. To register online, go to www.conted.und.edu/U2. Please provide the following information when you register: your name, department, box number, phone number, Social Security number (for accurate record keeping), and e-mail address; the title and date of the event; and the method of payment (ID billing, personal check, or credit card number and expiration date) if the event has a fee. – University Within the University.

 

Studio One Lists Program Schedule

This week, “Studio One” will celebrate its 250th live production with special alumni interviews. Since the program’s debut in 1987, nearly 400 students have contributed to the success of “Studio One,” which has won 213 awards. The program provides students with valuable experience in collegiate broadcasting, and “Studio One” alumni will help us reflect on the show’s history during a special interview segment.

Also on “Studio One,” you’ll learn how donating to charities and keeping your receipts can cut tax bills.

“Studio One” is an award-winning news and information program produced at the University of North Dakota Television Center. The program airs live on UND Channel 3 on Thursdays at 5 p.m. Rebroadcasts can be seen at noon, 7 and 11 p.m. daily and on Saturdays at 10 a.m. Public Prairie Television airs “Studio One” on Saturday at 6 a.m. The program can also be seen in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan, Minot, Minneapolis and Winnipeg, Manitoba. – Hilary Van de Streek, UND Studio One Marketing Team.

 

Please Recycle Cardboard

Corrugated cardboard, as well as thinner cardboard boxes (tissue boxes, files, paperboard), are recyclable in the UND program. Plastic liners or styrofoam packaging should be removed. No food should be left in the boxes. Please flatten your boxes and place them by your collection area at the end of the day. We recycled 52.2 tons of waste last year. – Janice Troitte, Recycling Coordinator, Facilities.

 

Denim Day Is Last Wednesday Of Month

It’s the last Wednesday of the month – that means Feb. 27 is Denim Day. Pay your dollar, wear your button, and “go casual.” All proceeds go to charity, of course. Tired of watching other offices and buildings have all the fun? Call me and I’ll set you up with buttons and posters for your area. – Patsy Nies, Enrollment Services/University Relations, 777-3791, for the Denim Day Committee.

 

Dak-Minn Blood Bank Thanks UND For Support

Dak-Minn Blood Bank wishes to thank the University for the support given to us in 2001. University of North Dakota students, faculty and staff donated 295 units of blood during the year. The Dak-Minn Blood Bank collected 4,421 units of blood last year. – Jan Orvik, Editor, for Melissa Selders-Ortez, Donor Resource Coordinator, Dak-Minn Bank.

 

IN REMEMBRANCE

Remembering William Barney

William Barney, professor emeritus of mechanical engineering, died Feb. 10 in Tri-County Nursing Home, Hatton. He was 70.

William Barney was born June 4, 1922, to William and M. May (Brunskill) Barney in Cando. They moved to Grand Forks in 1929, where he graduated from high school in 1939. He graduated from UND in 1943 with a degree in mechanical engineering. He served in the U.S. Army from 1944 to 1946, and was stationed in the Asiatic Pacific Theater. He married Ruth Renwick Oct. 25, 1947, in St. Paul.

He joined the UND faculty in 1946. He took part in energy research, and worked part-time as a results engineer for Northern States Power in Grand Forks. He retired in 1986.
“Bill Barney was a mentor and role model to hundreds of engineering students during his long career as a faculty member in mechanical engineering,” said Tom Owens, professor emeritus of chemical engineering. “He was a practitioner of the art and science of engineering, and he was able to convey the many facets of the profession to UND engineering graduates during his decades-long tenure as a faculty member. Bill was the materials expert on UND’s multidisciplinary team that conducted Project Lignite, the multi-million dollar research and development project to study the liquefaction of North Dakota lignite, during the 1970s.”

“Over the last 40 years there were hundreds of contacts by phone, letter, e-mail or visits by mechanical engineering alumni,” said Don Naismith, professor emeritus of mechanical engineering. “Each of them wanted an update on Bill Barney. He was a consistent, fair, and tough teacher. His sense of good humor and interaction with students was well-known, and his office door was always open. He had great ability to focus on his work and was able to apply great concentration to grading, class preparation or resolving an issue in Project Lignite, a team research activity. His long tenure and his great memory of people and places was a treasure trove for those of us who wanted to know aboutmechanical engineering history.

His dedication to the University, the School of Engineering and Mines, the mechanical engineering department, and those who were his students was extraordinary. I, along with many others, will miss him.” -- Jan Orvik, Editor, with information from the Grand Forks Herald, Tom Owens, and Don Naismith.

GRANTS AND RESEARCH

Summer Research Professors Appointed

The following members of the graduate faculty have been appointed to summer graduate research professorships for 2002: Christopher Austin (biology); Richard Crawford (biology); Irina Smoliakova (chemistry); Seounmi (Katie) Han Youn (communication); Manish Rami (communication sciences and disorders); and Philip Gerla (geology). They will pursue research activities and work closely with graduate advisees during the 2002 summer session. – Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School.

Faculty Receive Summer Instructional Development Fellowships

The following faculty have been awarded summer instructional development professorships for 2002: Gaye Burgess, assistant professor, theatre arts, “Development and Restructuring of the BFA in Performance Degree”; Tami Carmichael, coordinator and assistant professor, humanities and integrated studies, “Creating a Global Perspectives Course”; Seounmi (Katie) Han Youn, assistant professor, communication, “An Update of the Advertising Sequence Courses: Developing a New Course ‘Principles of Advertising’ and Revising an Existing Course ‘Advertising Creative Strategy’”; Dorothy Keyser, assistant professor, music, “Creating Online Versions of Two Music Department Graduate Courses”; Lori Robison, assistant professor, English, “Bringing Service Learning into the Composition Classroom”; Wayne Seames, assistant professor, chemical engineering, “Development of Course Content for New Two Semester Chemical Engineering Capstone Design Instructional Program”; Joann Segovia, assistant professor, accounting and business law, “New Course Development for Entrepreneurship 301: Accounting and Financial Concepts for Entrepreneurship”; William Shay, assistant professor, chemistry, “Development of an Organic Chemistry Laboratory Notebook Writing Manual”; Clifford Staples, professor, sociology and criminal justice studies, “Teaching SOC 302: Contemporary Social and Cultural Theory: A New Course in the Department of Sociology and Criminal Justice Studies”; Jack Weinstein, assistant professor, philosophy and religion, “A Development Plan for a Recurring Course in Aesthetics”; Timothy Young, assistant professor, physics, “Revising the Introductory Astronomy Laboratory”; Marcellin Zahui, assistant professor, mechanical engineering, “New Lab Experiment for Mechanical Engineering Practice Course.” -- Libby Rankin, Director, Office of Instructional Development.

Research, Grant Opportunities Listed

Following are research and grant opportunities. For additional information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278 or shirley_griffin@mail.und.nodak.edu.

ALBEE FOUNDATION
William Flanagan Memorial Creative Persons Center Residencies at the center for writers (including playwrights, screenwriters, fiction and non-fiction writers, and poets), painters, sculptors, and composers. Deadline: 4/1/02. Contact: 212/226-2020; 14 Harrison Street. New York, NY 10013.

ALLEN FOUNDATION
Support for research in the field of human nutrition and relevant nutritional research anywhere in the world. Deadline: 4/1/02. Contact: 517/832-5678; d-baum@tamu.edu; http://www.tamu.edu/baum/allen.html.

AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ALLERGY, ASTHMA, AND IMMUNOLOGY (AAAAI)
Summer Fellowship Medical Student Grants–Support for medical students to conduct research in allergy and immunology during summer recess. Deadline: 4/1/02. Contact: 414/272-6071; http://www.aaaai.org/professional/grantsa.../summer_fellowship_medical_student_grants.st.

AMERICAN ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY (AAS)
Chretien International Research Grants–Support to further international collaborative projects in observational astronomy. Deadline: 4/1/02. Contact: 202/328-2010; aas@aas.org; http://www.aas.org/grants/chretien.html.

CERN
Scientific Associateships–Support for established scientists to work at CERN. Areas of interest include experimental and theoretical particle physics, physical physics, electronics, computing and engineering. Deadlines: 3/28/02, 9/30/02. Contact: Recruitment

Service, Recruitment.Service@cern.ch; http://www.cern.ch; http://cern.web.cern.ch/CERN/Divisions/PE/HRS/Recruitment/associates.html.

CHRISTENSEN FUND
Science Program–Support for major research, education and/or training programs in the field of conservation science. Deadlines: 3/29/02, 5/31/02, 12/6/02. Contact: science-info@christensenfund.org; http://www.christensenfund.org/frame_science_program.html.

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE
Technology Opportunities Program (TOP)–Projects that involve: broadband technologies that bring very high-speed communications directly to end users; mobile wireless communication technologies that offer end users greater flexibility in how, where, and when they access information; empowering end users to move beyond passive information consumption to become valued contributors to the development, use, and expansion of shared information resources; and emerging data sharing techniques that facilitate the seamless and secure exchange of information across organizational boundaries. Deadline: 3/21/02. Contact: Stephen J. Downs, 202/482-2048; top@ntia.doc.gov; http://www.ntia.doc.gov/otiahome/top/whatsnew/whatsnew.htm#TOP2002.

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
OPE—FIPSE—Comprehensive Program--Support for projects to improve postsecondary education opportunities. Priorities: Projects to improve quality of K-12 teaching through new models of teacher preparation and new kinds of partnerships between schools/colleges/universities that enhance students’ preparation for, access to, and success in college; projects to promote innovative reforms in curriculum and instruction at college preparation, undergraduate, and graduate/professional levels, especially through student-centered or technology-mediated strategies; projects designing more cost-effective ways of improving postsecondary instruction and operations, i.e., to promote more student learning relative to institutional resources expended; projects to support new ways of ensuring equal access to postsecondary education, and improve rates of retention and program completion, especially for underrepresented students whose retention and completion rates continue to lag behind those of other groups. Deadlines: 3/13/02 (Preapplication); 5/24/02 (Application). Contact: Education Publications Center, 1-877/433-7827; edpubs@inet.ed.gov; http://www.ed.gov/FIPSE/; http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2002_register&docid=02-2762-filed.

OPE—FIPSE—Institutional Cooperation and Student Mobility in Postsecondary Education Among the US, Canada, and Mexico–Support for projects addressing a particular problem area or improvement approach in postsecondary education, including an invitational priority to encourage proposals designed to support formation of educational consortia of American, Canadian and Mexican institutions to encourage cooperation in the coordination of curricula, exchange of students and opening of educational opportunities throughout North America. Contact: Fund for the Improvement of Postseconary Education (FIPSE), 732/544-2504; FIPSE@ED.GOV; http://e-grants.ed.gov; http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2002_register&docid=02-729-filed. Deadlines: 3/29/02.

OPE—FIPSE—European Community-United States of America Cooperation Program in Higher Education/Vocational Education/Training--Support to improve postsecondary education opportunities by focusing on problem areas or improvement approaches in postsecondary education, with particular interest in collaborative projects which promote institutional cooperation and student mobility between the U.S. and the member states of the European Union. Deadline: 4/1/02. Contact: See above or edpubs@inet.ed.gov; http://e-grants.ed.gov; http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2002_register&docid=02-728-filed.

OPE—FIPSE: Institutional Cooperation/Student Mobility in Postsecondary Education Between the U.S. and Brazil--Proposals are encouraged that are designed to support the formation of educational consortia of American and Brazilian institutions to encourage cooperation in the coordination of curricula, exchange of students, and opening of educational opportunities between the U.S. and Brazil. Deadline: 3/29/02. Contact: Education Publications Center (ED Pubs), 877/433-7827; edpubs@inet.ed.gov; http://www.ed.gov/offices/OPE/FIPSE/Brazil/; http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2001_register&docid=01-28149-filed.

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE)
Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP)–Support for innovative, fundamental research to investigate DOE subsurface contamination in vadose and saturated zones. Deadline: 3/27/02. Contact: Roland F. Hirsch, 301/903-9009; roland.hirsch@science.doe.gov; http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2002_register&docid=02-284-filed.

Human Genome Program–Support for research that addresses ethical, legal, and social implications from use of information and knowledge resulting from the Human Genome Program. Deadline: 3/28/02. Contact: Daniel W. Drell, 301-903-4742; daniel.drell@science.doe.gov; http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2002_register&docid=02-282-filed.

Ocean Carbon Sequestration Research Program–Support for basic research projects on carbon sequestration in the oceans. Deadline: 03/26/2002. Contact: Anna Palmisano, 301/903-9963; anna.palmisano@science.doe.gov; http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=2001_register&docid=01-31468-filed.

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY
Chemistry Program–Support for research to advance understanding of chemical materials and processes for use in future Army technology. Contact: 919/549-4375; http://www.aro.army.mil/research/ARLBAA00/finalarlbaa1.pdf.
Electronics Program–Support for scientifc study and experimentation directed toward advancing the state of electronics or increasing knowledge and understanding. Deadline: None. Contact: See above.

Environmental Sciences Program–Support for fundamental research in the atmospheric and terrestrial sciences. Deadline: None. Contact: See Above.

Environmental Sciences Program–Support for fundamental research in the atmospheric and terrestrial sciences. Deadline: None. Contact: See Above.

Life Sciences Program--Support in: biomolecular and cellular materials and processes; physiology, survivability, and performance; and microbiology and biodegradation. Deadline: None. Contact: See Above.


Materials Science Program--Support to discover fundamental relationships that link chemical composition, microstructure, and processing history with resultant material properties and behavior. Deadline: None. Contact: See Above.

Sensors and Electron Devices–Focus on such topics as photonic devices and modules; novel optical processing algorithms and techniques; and sensor, actuators, and micro-mechanics. Deadline: None. Contact: See above.

Survivability/Lethality Analysis–Focus on coupling phenomenology of ADP equipment as an HPM predictive tool and RF digital models/simulations. Deadline: None. Contact: See Above

Weapons and Materials Research–Request for proposals in: materials and structures for missile defense, composite materials, advanced optics, advanced materials and material processing, electromagnetic technology, and weapon dynamics. Deadline: None. Contact: See Above.

FOGARTY INTERNATIONAL CENTER
Collaboration Award (PA-02-057)–Support for collaborative research between U.S. biomedical scientists and investigators in the developing world as well as in Central and Eastern Europe, and countries of the former Soviet Union. All biomedical and behavioral research topics supported by the NIH are eligible. Contact: Kathleen Michels, 301/496-1653; FIRCA@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/index.html; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-99-008.html. Deadlines: 3/25/02, 7/25/02.

HAGLEY MUSEUM AND LIBRARY
Henry Belin Du Pont Fellowship–Support for advanced research and study in the library, archival, and artifact collections of the Museum and Library. Deadlines: 3/31/02, 6/30/02, 10/30/02. Contact: Philip B. Scranton, 302-658-2400; crl@udel.edu; http://www.hagley.lib.de.us/centHB.htm.

HARRIS FOUNDATION
Support for demonstration and research programs in prevention of family dysfunction, such as teenage pregnancy and infant mortality and morbidity, infant mental health and early childhood development, the arts and educational television. Deadlines: 4/1/02, 9/1/02. Contact: Joan W. Harris, 2 North LaSalle Street, Suite 400, Chicago, IL 60602-3703; 312/621-0566.

HARVARD UNIVERSITY
Program on U.S.-Japan Relations–Fellowships for study of issues in U.S.-Japan relations, Japan’s relations with other countries, and domestic issues that bear on Japan’s international behavior. Deadline: 3/1/02. Contact: 617/495-1890; us_japan@cfia.harvard.edu; http://hdc-www.harvard.edu/cfia/us-japan/associates_2.htm.

MAZAMAS
Graduate Student Research Grant–Support to conduct master’s thesis or doctoral dissertation research concerned with exploration and preservation of mountain environments in the Pacific Northwest. Deadline: 3/31/02. Contact: 503/227-2345; clubrooms@mazamas.org; http://www.mazamas.org/resources/res_grantinfo.php.

NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE (NCI)
Early Clinical Trials of New Anti-Cancer Agents with Phase I Emphasis (RFA-CA-02-011)–NOTE: This is a new deadline date. Deadline: 3/28/02. Contact: Louise B. Grochow 301/496-1196; grochowl@ctep.nci.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-CA-02-011.html.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING (NIA)
Pilot Research Grant Program (PA-02-049)–Support to stimulate and facilitate entry of promising new investigators into aging research, and encourage established investigators to enter new targeted, high priority areas in this field. Deadlines: 3/15/02, 7/15/02, 11/15/02. Contact: David B. Finkelstein, 301/496-6402; BAPQuery@nia.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-02-049.html.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON DRUG ABUSE (NIDA)
National Prevention Research Initiative (NNPRI): Community Multi-Site Prevention Trials (CMPT) (RFA-DA-02-004). Deadlines: 3/26/02. Contact: Elizabeth Robertson, 301/443-1514; er52h@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DA-02-004.html.

National Prevention Research Initiative (NNPRI): Transdisciplinary Prevention Research Centers (RFA-DA-02-005). Deadlines: 3/26/02 (Letter of Intent); 4/26/02 (Application). Contact: Minda Lynch, 301/443-1887; mlynch@nida.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DA-02-005.html.

Using Basic Science to Develop New Directions in Drug Abuse Prevention Research (RFA-DA-02-010). Deadlines: 3/29/02 (Letter of Intent), 4/29/02 (Application). Contact: David Shurtleff, 301/443-1887; dshurtle@mail.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DA-02-010.html.

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF)/ DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION/NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH)
Interagency Education Research Initiative--FY2002 (IERI)–Support for research investigating the effectiveness of educational interventions in reading, mathematics, and the sciences as they are implemented in varied school settings with diverse student populations. Deadlines: 3/15/02 (Letter of Intent), 5/15/02 (Application). Contact: 703/292-5111; fsloane@nsf.gov; http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2002/nsf02062/nsf02062.html.

 

UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is also available electronically online at http://blogs.und.edu/uletter/. All articles submitted for publication should be labeled “University Letter” and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu or Fax to 777-4616. Attachments to University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number. University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations, Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.
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