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ISSUE: Volume 41, Number 29: March 26, 2004
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Top STories
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President Kupchella will lead open forums on Strategic Plan II development
Donna Shalala will address M.D. graduates
Reminder to complete harassment training program
Robert Potts accepts NDUS chancellor position
James Shaeffer appointed chief information officer
President Kupchella will address University Council May 3
American Indian-related expenditures totaled $12.3 million last year
 
events to note
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Nursing convocation set for March 26
LEEPS lecture is March 26
Communication sciences and disorders plans Friday colloquium
Empire lists events
Lotus Center hosts retreat March 26-28
Music department receives award Saturday
Nicolas Kendall to perform in Museum concert series
Free blood pressure checks offered Monday
Graduate committee will not meet March 29
Seielstad will discuss “The Tale of Copernican Humiliation”
Indian Law Center hosts lecture
Forum will focus on powwow tradition
Agenda listed for April 1 U Senate meeting
ADA advising board meets April 1
Blues Traveler and Gin Blossoms play spring concert
Museum hosts reception for artist Barton Lidice Benes
Open house will celebrate 20th year for CFSTC
35th annual powwow set for April 2-4
Chautaqua program will portray Amelia Earhart
Wenstrom Lecture discusses Omdahl, Strinden
Doctoral examination set for Terry Eckmann
Faculty invited to April box lunch discussions
Rethinking retention is topic of teleconference
Athletics, REA offer Easter brunch
“Living Legend” Shirley Chater will speak at nursing forum
Gaelic Storm will perform at Fritz next month
R&D Showcase III links campus research and business communities
Spots still available for April 30 grant writing seminar in Fargo
U2 lists workshops
 
announcements
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Ina Mae Rude Entrepreneur Center ready for construction
PeopleSoft navigation tutorials, training materials available
Death noted of student Kayla Thompson
Faculty, researchers sought for UND experts directory
Electrical outages planned for several dates in April
Fax project requests to 777-3071
Children sought for reading comprehension study
Denim Day is last Wednesday of month
Studio One lists features

Remembering Manuel Mariano

 
GRANTS & RESEARCH
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February grant recipients named
Funding opportunities will not run in University Letter as of July 1
Research, grant opportunities listed
 
TOP STORIES
 

President Kupchella will lead open forums on Strategic Plan II development

All members of the University community are invited to attend open forums, led by President Kupchella, to discuss the development of Strategic Plan II: Building on Excellence. Please see the schedule below.

Monday, March 29, 4:30 to 6 p.m., Loading Dock, Memorial Union; Tuesday, April 6, 4 to 5:30 p.m., River Valley Room, Memorial Union; Wednesday, April 7, noon to 1:30 p.m., Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union.

You are welcome to attend any or all the meetings that your schedule permits. The forums are sponsored by Student Senate, Staff Senate, University Senate, Academic Affairs, and the President’s Office. For more information on the strategic planning process, visit http://www.und.edu/stratplan2/.

— Charles Kupchella, President.

 

Donna Shalala will address M.D. graduates

Donna Shalala, president of the University of Miami in Florida, will present the keynote address at the medical school commencement ceremony at 1:30 p.m. Saturday, May 8, Chester Fritz Auditorium. A commencement awards brunch is planned for 10 a.m. that day at the UND Memorial Union.

Shalala served as secretary in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services under former President Bill Clinton. A native of Cleveland, Ohio, she received her bachelor’s degree from Western College for Women in 1962, and her master’s degree in 1968 and Ph.D. in 1970, both from Syracuse University. After graduating from college she volunteered for the Peace Corps and spent two years teaching in Iran. She has taught at Syracuse, Bernard Baruch College and Columbia University.

From 1977 to 1980 she served in the Carter Administration as an assistant secretary at the Department of Housing and Urban Development, then assumed the presidency of Hunter College in New York City. She was named chancellor of the University of Wisconsin in 1988, and served in that position until 1993 when President Clinton appointed her secretary for health and human services.

For more information, please contact the Office of the Dean, 777-2514.

– School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

 

Reminder to complete harassment training program

We thank those who have completed harassment training. If you have not yet completed the training, please do so immediately. This training is required for all faculty and staff, graduate students who teach, and students who supervise others in support of UND’s efforts to promote a respectful campus community for everyone. If you have any questions regarding how to access the training program, please contact the Office of General Counsel at 777-6345. Thanks for your cooperation.

– Charles Kupchella, president.

 

Robert Potts accepts NDUS chancellor position

Robert L. Potts, president of the University of North Alabama, has announced his acceptance of the position of chancellor of the North Dakota University System as offered by the State Board of Higher Education.

“The State Board of Higher Education is excited Dr. Potts has decided to accept our offer,” said Bruce I. Christianson, SBHE vice president. “We firmly believe he has the energy, enthusiasm and expertise needed to lead the North Dakota University System.”

Potts has been president of the University of North Alabama since 1990. He served as general counsel for the University of Alabama System from 1984 to 1989. Prior to that, he was a partner in the law firm of Potts and Young from 1971 to 1983. He received a law degree from the University of Alabama in 1969 and an L.L.M. from Harvard University in 1971.
Potts is expected to assume the chancellor’s position in July 2004. He and his wife Irene will live in Bismarck. The three-year contract as offered includes an annual salary of $175,000, a vehicle allowance of $11,000 and a housing and hosting allowance of $20,000.

The chancellor’s position became vacant when Larry Isaak resigned in November 2003 to accept another position. Michel Hillman, vice chancellor for academic and student affairs, is serving as interim chancellor until Dr. Potts assumes the position.

– North Dakota University System.

 

James Shaeffer appointed chief information officer

James Shaeffer has been appointed the University’s first chief information officer, President Charles Kupchella has announced. Kupchella created the position in April 2001 and Shaeffer, who is also associate vice president for outreach services and dean of outreach programs, has served in an interim capacity since that time.

“I am pleased to appoint Jim Shaeffer as chief information officer. He has done an excellent job during his tenure as interim CIO. The thoughtful and managed integration of information technology in all aspects of the University — from instruction, to research, to providing services for our students, staff, faculty, as well as service to the citizens of North Dakota — will be critical to our overall success in achieving our goals,” Kupchella said. “Jim’s effectiveness has been such that we are in essence taking the word ‘interim’ from his title.”

Shaeffer earned a master’s degree in elementary education from Kansas State University and a doctoral degree in teaching-learning processes with an emphasis in instructional design and theory from Northwestern University. He has more than 20 years of experience in higher education.

Shaeffer joined the Division of Continuing Education in 1996 after serving in several positions in continuing education at the University of Wyoming, including director of the School of Extended Studies and Public Service for four years. He was awarded the John L. Christopher Leadership Award by the University Continuing Education Association Region V in 1996. Some areas of expertise include leadership, management, administration, marketing, program development and distance learning.

Shaeffer will play a leadership role on the UND campus by providing advice to the President and his Cabinet on the use of information technology, and advocating for the use of information technology on the campus. As CIO, Shaeffer will be responsible for the implementation of UND’s information technology plan, creating and coordinating a process for course and program development utilizing distributed learning technologies, and chairing the University Information Technology Council.

 

President Kupchella will address University Council May 3

President Kupchella will address the University Council at 4 p.m. Monday, May 3, in the Memorial Union Ballroom.
The University Council consists of the following who are employed primarily on the Grand Forks campus: the president, vice presidents, registrar, director of libraries, all deans, all department chairpersons, all full-time faculty of the rank of instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, and professor; program directors, coordinators, assistant and associate deans who concurrently hold faculty rank; the director of the counseling center; professional librarians, and such other academic personnel and administrative officers as the council may designate. The quorum of the council necessary for the transaction of business is 25 percent of the council membership (or 144 of the current 576 members). The president is the ex officio chairman, and the registrar is the ex officio secretary. Council meetings are open to the public, and students, staff and the general public are invited to attend.

– Nancy Krogh (registrar), University Council secretary.

 

American Indian-related expenditures totaled $12.3 million last year

Total expenditures for American Indian-related student aid and programming at the University of North Dakota were $12,372,956 in the year ended June 30, up 22 percent from $10,136,003 in 2001-2002.

The figures come from an annual tracking report compiled as part of UND’s strategic planning process, said Budget Director Alice Brekke. Further developing the University’s American Indian programs is part of that plan.

Included are all the dollars UND can track that funded Indian-related programs – about $7.5 million – or that went to individual American Indian students in the form of scholarships, grants and loans – about $4.8 million.

Although the funding for UND’s Indian-related expenditures came from more than 100 separate sources, 79 percent of the total originated with the federal government.

State funding provided $581,981, or 5.74 percent of the total, not including 219 full or partial tuition waivers valued at $446,410 that were granted as part of UND’s diversity tuition waiver program. The two largest state-funded expenditures were for the American Indian Programs office, $287,225, and the academic Indian Studies department, $201,494.

Much of the growth was in the financial aid area, up $1.6 million. This growth reflected in part the increased cost of attending UND, which resulted in larger aid packages to many students. The estimated cost of attending UND last year, including tuition and room and board, ranged from $7,649 to $12,582 for undergraduates, depending upon their state of origin.

An estimated $4.1 million of the total went to American Indian students not because of their ethnicity but because their low incomes qualified them for the assistance awarded all students in similar circumstances through such programs as the Pell Grant.

Regardless of ethnicity, financial aid packages typically include several sources of funds. Tribal governments provided $480,523 in grants to 189 students.

The number of students identifying themselves as Native Americans or Alaskan Natives under the federal government’s definition remained stable at 434 students, up one from the previous year. Some American Indians choose not to identify their ethnic status.

 
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EVENTS TO NOTE
 

Nursing convocation set for March 26

The College of Nursing spring convocation and sophomore recognition will be held Friday, March 26, from 9 a.m. to noon at the Ramada Inn, Grand Forks. The convocation will feature a keynote address from Elizabeth Nichols, dean and professor of nursing, who will present “Where Have All the Nurses Gone?”

A panel presentation on “Quality Nursing Care in North Dakota” with a discussion by panel members Eleanor Dossenako, supervisor, St. Aloisus Medical Center, Harvey; Debbie Swanson, nursing supervisor, Grand Forks Public Health; Evelyn Quigley, senior executive and chief nursing officer, MeritCare Health System; and Lisa Isler, UND senior nursing student will also be presented. The convocation is open to the public.

– Faculty development committee, College of Nursing.

 

LEEPS lecture is March 26

David Ufnar from the University of Southern Mississippi will present the next LEEPS lecture Friday, March 26.
At noon in 100 Leonard Hall, he will discuss “Holocene Landscape Evolution of Southeast Mississipppi.” At 3 p.m. in 109 Leonard Hall, he will consider “Mass Balance Modeling of the Mid-Cretaceous Hydrologic Cycle in North America.”
The geology and geological engineering Leading Edge of Earth and Planetary Science (LEEPS) lecture program brings nationally and internationally known scientists and others to UND to give talks on cutting edge science and engineering. Lectures cover a wide range of topics, including academic science, applied engineering, and environmental issues of current significance.

For more information, contact Richard Josephs at 777-2131.

 

Communication sciences and disorders plans Friday colloquium

Richard Shine, a professor emeritus of communication sciences and disorders at East Carolina University, will speak at the communication sciences and disorders colloquium Friday, March 26, at 1 p.m. in 150 Gamble Hall. Everyone is invited.

Dr. Shine is a former associate editor of Language, Speech and Hearing Services in Schools. In 1999 he received the North State Clinical Achievement Award from ASHA (North Carolina) for his role as teacher, researcher, colleague, and mentor in the area of fluency and articulation/phonological disorders, specifically in the areas of diagnosis and treatment for both children and adults. He has developed the Systematic Fluency Therapy For The Young Child (SFTYC), co-authored the Secord Contextual Articulation Test (S-CAT) and produced videos like: Assessment and Management of Stuttering in Children and Etiology and Philosophy of Stuttering.

– Manish Rami, communication sciences and disorders.

 

Empire lists events

The following events are scheduled at the Empire Arts Center. The UND Writers Conference will show Tony Buba’s Struggles in Steel Friday, March 26, at 8 p.m. And the first Duel of Fools, an improv comedy competition between local group Nine & Numb and two other regional improv groups will take place Saturday, March 27, at 7 p.m.
Next week, Schroeder Middle School takes over the Empire with their performance of “Fiddler on the Roof.” Public performances will be Thursday, April 1, and Friday, April 2, at 7 p.m. On Saturday, April 3, the Dream Project will show Skateboard Videos on the big screen as a fund raiser. The videos start at 7 p.m. The weekend doesn’t end until Miss Grand Forks is named Sunday afternoon, April 4. The time of the Miss Grand Forks Pageant will be announced.
For more information visit www.empireartscenter.com or call 746-5500.

— Jan Orvik, editor, for Empire Arts Center.

 

Lotus Center hosts retreat March 26-28

The Lotus Meditation Center will host a non-residential insight meditation retreat March 26-28, with visiting teacher Donald Rothberg. The fee is $80 and includes two meals; scholarships are available. Please contact Lora at 787-8839 for registration information. The retreat begins Friday evening at 7 p.m. with a talk that is open to the public and free of charge.

– Lora Sloan, Lotus Meditation Center.

 

Music department receives award Saturday

The music department will receive the distinguished service award from the North Dakota String Teachers Association for promoting string education in North Dakota and establishing a new faculty position in violin, now held by Eric Lawson. The award will be presented during the orchestra portion of the All-State Music Festival concert at West Fargo High School Saturday, March 27, at 7:30 p.m. Receiving the award will be Gary Towne, Eric Lawson, Jeffrey Seabloom and Naomi Welsh.

-- Gary Towne, professor and chair, music.

 

Nicolas Kendall to perform in Museum concert series

American violinist Nicolas Kendall, accompanied by pianist Pei Yao Wang will perform for the Museum concert series at the North Dakota Museum of Art Sunday, March 28, at 2 p.m. The program will feature music by Cesar Franck, Edvard Grieg, Peter Ilych Tchaikovsky, and Paul Schoenfield.

Kendall won first prize in the 2002 young concert artists international auditions, as well as the Fergus Prize for an appearance with the orchestra. He also won the Pennsylvania Prize with the Janet Weis Award, a cash prize and concert tour, and the Bärenreiter Prize for Violin. The Rhoda Walker Teagle Prize sponsored his 2003 New York debut in the Young Concert Artists Series. He also debuted in Washington, D.C., at the Kennedy Center and in Boston at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum last season, and appeared at New York’s Merkin Concert Hall.

At 15, Kendall won the competition to perform with the National Symphony Orchestra, and at 16 he won the Saint Louis Symphony Young Artist Competition. He has also soloed with the Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra, the Mansfield (Ohio) Symphony and the Haddonfield (N.J.) Symphony.

Following a tradition set by his grandfather, John Kendall, who was the first string teacher to introduce the Suzuki method in the U.S., Nicolas Kendall is enthusiastic about playing for children in outreach performances. He enjoys playing percussion as well as violin in non-classical music such as folk, Appalachian and Eastern music, including concerts as a violinist of “Time for Three.”

Born in Taipei, Taiwan, Pei Yao Wang began her piano studies at age 5. Three years later she became the youngest pianist ever to appear in recital at the Taipei Cultural Center, received first prize in the Taiwan National Piano Competition, and was invited to study in the U.S. at the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. After graduating in 1994, she continued her studies at Yale University, where she pursued a concentration in architecture and received a Master of Music Degree as a student of Claude Frank. Wang resides in New York City.

Pianist Pei Yao Wang has appeared as soloist with the Orlando and Chattanooga Symphonies and the Taipei Symphony Orchestra, and her performances as a collaborator have taken her to such venues as New York’s Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center in Washington D.C., Suntory Hall in Tokyo, Salle des Varietes in Monte-Carlo, and the National Concert Hall in Taiwan.

The Museum Concert Series is underwritten by the Myra Foundation with additional support from The Heartland Arts Fund. The Heartland Arts Fund is a collaborative venture of Mid-America Arts Alliance, Arts Midwest, their member state arts agencies (Arkansas, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas and Wisconsin) with primary funding from the national Endowment for the Arts, and support from private contributors. Local contributors also support the Concert Series.

Tickets for the Concert Series are available by subscription to the series, and will be available for single concerts at the door or in advance at the North Dakota Museum of Art. Non-member tickets are $15 per concert at the door. Member tickets are $13 per concert at the door. Student and military tickets are $5 per concert at the door, with free admittance for children, middle school and under. Order your tickets by sending a check or calling 777-4195.

– North Dakota Museum of Art.

 

Free blood pressure checks offered Monday

Free blood pressure checks will be offered by the Nursing Students Association from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, March 29, at the Memorial Union. More than 50 million American adults — one in four — have high blood pressure. High blood pressure increases your risk for getting heart disease and/or kidney disease, and for having a stroke. It is especially dangerous because it often has no warning signs or symptoms. Regardless of race, age, or gender, anyone can develop high blood pressure. You can prevent and control high blood pressure by taking action. For more information contact the student health promotion office at 777-2097 or stop by the office on the main floor of the Memorial Union under the Healthier U sign.

 

Graduate committee will not meet March 29

The graduate committee will not meet March 29.

– Joseph Benoit, dean, graduate school.

 

Seielstad will discuss “The Tale of Copernican Humiliation”

George Seielstad, director of the Northern Great Plains Center for People and the Environment, will give a Benediktson Lecture titled “How Special Are We? The Tale of Copernican Humiliation,” Tuesday, March 30, at 4 p.m. in 210 Clifford Hall Auditorium. A reception will precede the talk at 3:30 p.m. The lecture is free and intended for a general audience.
For a long time humans thought Earth was the center of the universe, that the cosmos pivoted around our planet. Copernicus started a re-evaluation by pointing out that, in fact, Earth and its companion planets were subservient to the sun, about which they revolved. Ever since, our self-assumed centrality has suffered innumerable demotions.
One look into the deepest recesses of space dwarfs the planet we reside upon as little more than a dust mote afloat in a vast cosmic sea. And now, the deepest humiliation of all, we encounter the fact that we and everything we are familiar with is only four percent of all the matter-energy there is.

Humbling as this advance in knowledge may be to our significance as a species, it is compensated by the magnificence that the human intellect allows us to acquire the knowledge of our place in the grand scheme of things.

The Benediktson Lecture Series is named for Oliver Benediktson (1904-1996), a North Dakota native from Mountain and the son of pioneers. He provided a $1.5 million bequest to create the Oliver L. Benediktson Endowment at UND, establishing a chair in astrophysics and a lecture series.

George Seielstad is the first recipient of the Benediktson Chair. In appreciation, he is presenting lectures on the wonders of science for general audiences.

– Odegard School.

 

Indian Law Center hosts lecture

Please mark your calendars for the Northern Plains Indian Law Center’s fourth annual distinguished lecture series Tuesday, March 30, from 2 to 4 p.m. in the School of Law’s Baker Courtroom.

The theme for this year’s distinguished lecture centers on lawyers working for Indian and tribal rights. The distinguished lecture will be delivered by John Echohawk, the executive director of the Native American Rights Fund. He has been recognized as one of the 100 most influential lawyers in America by the National Law Journal since 1988, and has received numerous awards for his leadership in the fields of Indian and tribal law.

Echohawk’s presentation will be followed by the panel of law graduates who have worked for or with tribes. The panelists are Mario Gonzales, general counsel for the Oglala Sioux Tribe and is the author of the book, The Politics of Wounded Knee; Janice Morley, an assistant U.S. attorney and tribal liaison in the district of North Dakota, currently serving a term with the U.S. Attorney’s Executive Office in Washington, D.C.; Mark Fox, a former legislator for the Three Affiliated Tribes and former treasurer of the National Indian Gaming Association, who currently works at the Four Bears Casino and Lodge; and Karen Eri, a staff attorney with Wisconsin Judicare’s Indian Law Office. Michelle Rivard, who serves both as tribal counsel for the Spirit Lake Nation and project director for the Northern Plains Tribal Judicial Institute, will serve as moderator.

Everyone is welcome. There will be an informal reception in the Tisdale Lounge immediately following the presentations.

— Kathryn Rand, law.

 

Forum will focus on powwow tradition

The final in “The American Indian Experience” series is a community forum Thursday, April 1, 7 to 9 p.m. in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. Brian Gilley, assistant professor of Indian studies, and Russ McDonald, associate research director of the National Resource Center on Native American Aging at UND, both of whom will be involved in the UNDIA powwow on April 2-4 at the Hyslop Sports Center, will explain the role of tradition in modern powwows. Dancers and musicians will perform and explain the significance of various aspects of the powwow and of American Indian dancing.

More information about the events and the availability of the Starita book is available at www.conted.und.edu/AIE.

 

Agenda listed for April 1 U Senate meeting

The University Senate will meet Thursday, April 1, at 4:05 p.m. in Room 7, Gamble Hall.

AGENDA
1. Announcements.
2. Minutes of the previous meeting and business arising from the minutes.
3. Question period.

CONSENT CALENDAR:
4. Annual report of the Senate conflict of interest/scientific misconduct committee, Jane Dunlevy, chair.
5. Annual report of the Senate intercollegiate athletics committee, Sue Jeno, chair.

BUSINESS CALENDAR:
6. Report from the curriculum committee, Judy Bruce, chair.
7. Senate committee elections.
8. Report from the ad hoc curriculum committee, Nancy Krogh.
9. Policy on faculty pursuit of advanced degrees, Joseph Benoit.
10. Report from the Senate ad hoc committee on experiential learning, Lana Rakow.
11. Proposal for a Center for Community Engagement, Lana Rakow.

— Nancy Krogh (registrar), secretary, University Senate.

 

ADA advising board meets April 1

The ADA advisory board meeting has been rescheduled for Thursday, April 1, at 3:30 p.m. in 305 Twamley Hall.

– Sally Page, affirmation action.

 

Blues Traveler and Gin Blossoms play spring concert

The University Program Council and Ralph Engelstad Arena present the UND Spring Concert featuring Blues Traveler with special guest Gin Blossoms Thursday, April 1, 7:30 p.m. at the Ralph Engelstad Arena. Tickets are on sale now. UND student tickets are $5, tickets for non-UND students are $25; they are available at the Ralph Engelstad Arena box office, all ticketmaster locations by calling 772-5151 or online at theralph.com. All seats are general admission.

– Ralph Engelstad Arena.

 

Museum hosts reception for artist Barton Lidice Benes

An exhibition by New York artist Barton Lidice Benes is at the North Dakota Museum of Art through April 28. The public is invited to attend a party for Benes at the Museum Friday, April 2, from 7 to 8:30 p.m.

Barton Lidice Benes, a third generation Czech-American, was born in Westwood, N.J., in 1942. His middle name, Lidice, was given to him by his father in defiance against Hitler. The year Benes was born, the Nazis murdered every adult male in the Czech village of Lidice. After the atrocity, Hitler is quoted as saying, “Lidice is dead.” With the naming of his newborn son, Barton’s father is quoted as saying, “Lidice lives.” Years later during a visit to Lidice, Benes took a rose from the memorial rose garden and added it to his reliquary. It is part of the North Dakota Museum of Art’s current exhibit.

Benes has not worked with relics alone. He began working with paint, but found success in the art scene in the 1980s with his use of shredded currency as his preferred media.
In 1989 Benes’ work was exhibited during the grand opening of the Museum, and was followed by exhibitions in 1993 and 1998.

Benes is an important component of the structure of the North Dakota Museum of Art itself. During the remodeling of the west gym into the Museum, Director Laurel Reuter sought the assistance of artists to help complete the physical design of the space. Benes’ contribution was designing the Museum Shop. Using the familiar material of shredded currency, he also created the center display column and the Museum shop sign.

The Donor Wall was also designed by Benes. For every large donor to the Museum, Benes will create an individual work of art. He uses the same format and style he uses in his reliquary for the Donor Wall pieces.

At the bottom row of the Donor Wall there is a donation from Barton Benes himself to the Museum. Along with the “African and Egyptian” collection in his will, Benes has also donated the entire contents of his art-filled, New York City apartment. The apartment will be recreated in its entirety, as a work of art, here at the Museum.

The North Dakota Museum of Art is located on Centennial Drive. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekends. For more information, call 777-4195.

— North Dakota Museum of Art.

 

Open house will celebrate 20th year for CFSTC

Children and Family Services Training Center is celebrating its 20th anniversary with an open house Friday, April 2, from 2 to 4:30 p.m. in the basement of Gillette Hall.

The training center was established in the social work department in March 1984 through a partnership with the Division of Children and Family Services of the North Dakota Department of Human Services. It was created to design and provide child welfare training opportunities to practitioners, serve as an advocate for child welfare related initiatives and programs, serve as a resource center concerning child welfare training materials and issues, and provide consultation in the area of child welfare practice and administration.

– Pete Tunseth, director, Chidlren and Family Services Training Center.

 

35th annual powwow set for April 2-4

The UND Indian Association will hold the 35th annual UNDIA Powwow and Time Out Wacipi Friday through Sunday, April 2-4, at the Hyslop Sports Center.

Following is information about powwows written by Paul Boswell, director of multicultural student services, NDSU.

The American Indian celebration known as the powwow is the most enduring, large-scale gathering of people in North America. The powwow predates the appearance of white settlers in this region and even predates the arrival of Christopher Columbus.

The American Indian powwow is loud, colorful, and alive. Dressed in gorgeous regalia, female and male dancers of all ages are in constant motion, moving in a broad circle around the arena. Seated around their drums, drummers pound out thunderous beats and their soaring vocals are relentless and inspiring.

Is it possible to attend a powwow and not be overwhelmed by the sights and sounds, emotionally charged, and captivated by this celebration of the human spirit? If you have never before attended a powwow, the experience is awesome, extraordinary, and life-affirming.

As you walk into the arena, you are caught up in the spectacle. The beating of your own heart seems in synchronization with the drum beat. Dancers range from toddlers and teens to parents and elders. When you see the line of dancers flowing dreamlike around the center of the arena, you wish you were one of them.

The presence of people from all walks of life brought together for this ethnic festival shows that human beings can get along, become friends, and love one another. At powwows in this region, there are perhaps as many non-Indians as Indians in the audience. Isn’t that how it should be?

It is somewhat of a miracle that American Indians have not only overcome historical trials and tribulations, but they are as brave, robust, and proud as ever. With each and every powwow held here or elsewhere in the United States, American Indian people are issuing a bold reminder that not only do they still exist but their ageless traditions remain moving, vibrant, and powerful.

Admission is $5/day, $8 for the weekend, and free for those 65 and over or 6 years and younger. For UND students, daily admission is $1, and $3 for the weekend, with student ID.

For more information, contact the UND Indian Association at 777-6291.

 

Chautaqua program will portray Amelia Earhart

A special Chautauqua-style program by Amelia Earhart will be presented Monday, April 5, at the Hilton Garden Inn in Grand Forks from 7 to 8:30 p.m. Earhart will be portrayed by Ann Birney, an historian with her Ph.D. in American history. Birney, like Earhart, is from Kansas.

Earhart will be speaking from the year 1937, just before she departed from Florida for her attempted around-the-world flight. Earhart made it to within 35 to 100 miles of Howland Island in the Pacific. Her plane apparently went down in that area after running low on fuel; the bodies of Earhart and her navigator, as well as the wreckage of her plane were never found.

This Chautauqua program is being held to honor women in aviation at UND and the Grand Forks Air Force Base, local commercial female pilots, and area women who have private pilot’s licenses. The free program is open to the public; attendees do not have to be involved in aviation. Registration is not required but is recommended. To make reservations please call Suezette Rene Bieri at 777-4856 or 1-800-828-4274.

Birney will also be portraying Earhart at programs for sixth graders later in the week in Grand Forks, Bismarck and Williston. She will be flown to the other locations in North Dakota by UND Aerospace.

These programs are sponsored by the NASA North Dakota Space Grant Consortium, the Department of Aviation and Space Studies at UND, and the dean’s office of the J.D. Odegard School of Aerospace Sciences, NASA Langley Space Flight Center, the Grand Forks Herald, the North Dakota Heritage Center, Williston State College, the Williston Chamber of Commerce, and Jeff Nelson from the Northern Plains Radio Network.

– Odegard School.

 

Wenstrom Lecture discusses Omdahl, Strinden

The Bureau of Governmental Affairs announces the inaugural Frank Wenstrom Lecture Series, Tuesday, April 6, from 6 to 7:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union’s Fred Orth Lecture Bowl. The evening will explore the careers and opinions of former Lt. Gov. Lloyd Omdahl and former House Majority Leader Earl Strinden. All friends and colleagues, and all others interested in the significant contributions these two have made to North Dakota, are encouraged to attend.

– Steve Snortland, assistant director, Bureau of Governmental Affairs

 

Doctoral examination set for Terry Eckmann

The final examination for Terry F. Eckmann, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in educational leadership, is set for 8:30 a.m. Tuesday, April 6, in Room 208, Education Building. The dissertation title is “The Emotional Intelligence of Award-Winning Fitness Industry Professionals.” Katrina Meyer (educational leadership) is the committee chair. The public is invited to attend.

– Joseph Benoit, dean, graduate school.

 

Faculty invited to April box lunch discussions

Three sessions will round out the On Teaching box lunch discussion series for 2003-04:

• “Designing Effective Multiple-Choice Tests,” Tuesday, April 6, 12:30 to 1:30 p.m., Memorial Room, Memorial Union.
This is a reprise of one of the most popular sessions of last fall’s Conference on Teaching. Three faculty from the medical school — Ken Ruit, Kurt Borg, and Edward Simanton — will share what they have learned about writing exams that are useful for both formative (student learning/feedback) and summative (grading/certification of competence) purposes. After their brief presentation, they will engage the audience in further conversation about the topic.

• “Teaching With Differences in Mind: Stories and Strategies,” Friday, April 16, noon to 1:30 p.m., Badlands Room, Memorial Union.

This extended lunch hour session will focus on using narrative, or the telling of stories, to explore issues of difference in the classroom. Our special guest for the day will be Angela Leonard, African American scholar in American Studies at Loyola University.

She will be joined on the panel by two UND faculty members, Brian Gilley (Indian studies), and Gayle Baldwin (philosophy and religion).

• “Undergraduates Teaching Assistants: Economic Necessity or Effective Pedagogy?” Wednesday, April 21, noon to 1 p.m., Memorial Room, Memorial Union.

This session will feature four faculty who received model project awards for designing projects that use advanced undergraduate students as peer teachers in lower level classes. We’ll hear from Dave Pierce (chemistry), Roger Melvold and Fran Sailer (microbiology and immunology), and Gayle Baldwin (philosophy and religion), each of whom will tell us what they are doing, why they initiated the project, and what they have learned so far. We’ll also have time to talk about the advantages and disadvantages of using undergraduate peer instructors in the classroom.

To register for any of these sessions and reserve a free box lunch, call Jana Hollands at 777-4998 at least two full days before the event.

— Libby Rankin, office of instructional development.

 

Rethinking retention is topic of teleconference

The National Resource Center for the First-Year Experience and Students in Transition production, “Rethinking Retention” is scheduled for Thursday, April 8, noon to 2 p.m., in the United Hospital Room, Medical School building. The teleconference is sponsored by student outreach services, career services, and TRIO programs. With demands for accountability increasing and campuses trying to fulfill their missions and serve more students with reduced financial support, retention remains the focal point of many campus discussions. Helping students succeed is both a financial imperative and a professional and ethical obligation. Join our experts as they reframe our thinking on retention while offering new approaches and strategies based on best practices and empirical research. They focus this conversation on creating pathways for students by looking vertically, from middle school through college matriculation and graduation, and horizontally, across campus departments and units, to find new approaches to our longstanding problems.

— TRIO programs.

 

Athletics, REA offer Easter brunch

The UND Athletic Department and Ralph Engelstad Arena invite you to Easter Sunday Brunch at Ralph Engelstad Arena on Sunday, April 11, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The menu will include waffle delight, breads galore, bountiful buffet, fresh fruit cascade, everything omelets, peel and eat shrimp, and much, much more! Beside a great meal, you can enjoy self-guided building tours, including ice level. Open skating will be available in the Olympic Arena from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. There will be an Easter egg hunt for children 6 and under, and a special prize drawing for kids 7-12 (win a new mountain bike). Other door prizes include a pair of World Junior ticket packages ($900 value), gas grill and two paid tuitions to UND Hockey Camp ($420 value). Other family fun activities include Puck Shoot and Games to Go, and the Easter Bunny will make a special appearance. For reservations call 777-4920.

– Ralph Engelstad Arena.

 

“Living Legend” Shirley Chater will speak at nursing forum

Shirley Chater is the featured speaker at a nursing leadership forum to be held at the Alerus Center Friday, April 16, 8:30 a.m. to noon. Dr. Chater serves as the chair of the National Advisory Committee for the Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellows Program. She was a University of California Regents Professor at the Institute for Health and Aging, University of California, San Francisco, from 1997-1998. She previously served as the commissioner of the United States Social Security Administration from 1993-1997, and has served as president of Texas Woman’s University and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of California, San Francisco. As an independent lecturer and consultant, Chater works with many universities and organizations. She also serves as a senior consultant with the Academic Search Consultation Service, Washington, D.C./Mill Valley, Calif. Honored by the American Academy of Nursing as a “Living Legend” 2000, she holds a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of Pennsylvania, a master’s degree in nursing from the University of California, San Francisco, and 12 honorary doctorate degrees. The leadership forum is sponsored by Robert Wood Johnson Executive Nurse Fellows Loretta Heuer, associate professor of nursing, and Debbie Swanson, nursing supervisor, Grand Forks Public Health Department. There will be a panel discussion with North Dakota nurse leaders: Darleen Bartz, chief, health resources section, North Dakota Department of Health; Elizabeth Nichols, dean of UND’s College of Nursing; Evelyn Quigley, senior executive and chief nursing officer, MeritCare Health System; and Margret Reed, chief nurse executive and administrator of surgical services, Altru Health System.

There is no charge for this event, which is open to the public. Pre-registration is requested but not required. A continental breakfast will be provided.

For more information or to register contact Loretta Heuer, 777-4527, or Debbie Swanson, 787-8113, .

– College of Nursing.

 

Gaelic Storm will perform at Fritz next month

The Gaelic Storm (Celtic music) will be held at the Chester Fritz Auditorium at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 24. Please call 777-4090 for ticket information. This is not a Northern Plains Ballet Company production as was stated in the Datebook.

– University Relations.

 

R&D Showcase III links campus research and business communities

R&D Showcase III will be held Thursday, April 29, at the Fargodome in Fargo. This year’s showcase seminar will be hosted by North Dakota State University and features the theme, “Technology as a Catalyst for North Dakota’s Growth.” Sessions will highlight ways in which campus research and development activities can successfully interact with the business community to spur economic growth. Area business leaders, along with campus faculty, staff, and students, are encouraged to attend.

Bruce McWilliams, president and CEO of Tessera Technologies, Inc. of San Jose, Calif., will be the keynote speaker. McWilliams has been involved in a number of high-tech companies, including S-Vision Inc., a silicon chip-based display company; Flextronics International Ltd., an electronic manufacturing services company; and nCHIP Inc., a multi-chip module packaging company.

Tessera Technologies, Inc. is a developer of intellectual property and services that help the semiconductor industry build smaller, faster, and more reliable electronic products. In 2002, Tessera was one of Inc. Magazine’s “The Innovation 50,” a listing of the most inventive small companies in entrepreneurial America. The company’s advanced chip-scale packaging innovations have been used in a wide range of wireless, computing, gaming, entertainment, medical, and defense electronic products.

The dinner presentation will feature Paul Drzaic, vice president of advanced development for Alien Technology, who will share “The Alien Technology Story.” For more information about the event or to register online, go to http://www.ndsuresearchpark.com.

 

Spots still available for April 30 grant writing seminar in Fargo

Registrations are still being accepted for the grant writing seminar Friday, April 30, in Fargo, sponsored by the North Dakota Biomedical Research Infrastructure Network (BRIN). Participants can register online at the ND BRIN web site by April 1. The seminar is designed for science faculty interested in submitting grants to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and National Science Foundation (NSF). The eight-hour seminar, conducted by Grant Writers Seminars and Workshops, will be held in conjunction with the North Dakota Academy of Science Annual Meeting April 29-30 at the Ramada Plaza Suites and Conference Center in Fargo. For registration materials and additional information, please visit the North Dakota BRIN web site at www.medicine.nodak.edu/brin.

— Patrick Miller, North Dakota Biomedical Research Infrastructure Network.

 

U2 lists workshops

Below are U2 workshops for April 5 through April 16. Visit our web site for additional workshops in April and May.
Please reserve your seat by registering with U2 by phone, 777-2128; e-mail, U2@mail.und.nodak.edu; or online, www.conted.und.edu/U2/. Please include workshop title and date, name, department, position, box number, phone number, e-mail address, and how you first learned of the workshop. Thank you for registering in advance; it helps us plan for materials and number of seats.

HTML, Creating a Web Page Using HTML: April 5 and 7, 9 to 11:30 a.m. (five hours total). Learn how to create a web page with hyper-text, markup language, graphics, and links. Presenter: Doris Bornhoeft.

Defensive Driving: April 6, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., 211 Rural Technology Center. This workshop is required by state fleet for all UND employees who drive state fleet vehicles on a regular (monthly) basis, received a traffic violation, or had an accident while operating a state fleet vehicle. Employees are encouraged to bring a family member. This workshop may also reduce your North Dakota insurance premiums and could possibly remove points from your driving record. Presenter: Jason Uhlir

A Woman’s Money, A Woman’s Future: April 6, 4 to 6 p.m., 211 Rural Technology Center, or April 7, 10 a.m. to noon, River Valley Room, Memorial Union. This presentation targets women’s issues through four “life-stages” and highlights why planning is critical. Topics include the importance of participating in an employer plan, taking advantage of tax-deferred investing, choosing appropriate investments products, things to consider if suddenly single, and how to leave a legacy to heirs. Presenter: Molly Melanson, TIAA-CREF.

Social Security Pre-Retirement Seminar: April 7, 2:30 to 4:30 p.m., River Valley Room, Memorial Union. Information concerning Social Security and Medicare Programs will be presented. Presenter: Howard Kossover, Public Affairs Specialist of the Regional Social Security Administration Office.

Finding Funding, How to Use The Community of Science Search Engine and More: April 8, 9 to 11 a.m., 361 Upson II Hall. Nearly one year ago, UND moved from using Sponsored Programs Information Network (SPIN) to the Community of Science (COS), giving faculty and staff more extensive search capabilities, as well as a variety of other services. For many years, ORPD staff selected representative samples of funding opportunities from a variety of academic areas and published them in the University Letter. However, the number of funding opportunities that are available greatly exceeds the number printed weekly in the University Letter. ORPD is concerned that faculty seeking research opportunities may miss them simply because they do not see something of interest in the University Letter. Consequently, as of July 1, 2004, ORPD will no longer list funding opportunities in the University Letter, but rather will encourage faculty and staff to register with COS.

This workshop will show faculty and staff how to use some of the Community of Science’s services including:
• COS Expertise, the database of detailed, first person profiles of more than 480,000 research professionals.
• COS Funding Opportunities, the largest source of grant information on the web.
• COS Funding Alert, which will email members once a week with relevant, new, and update funding opportunities.

All of the above services can be accessed using your COS Workbench, a customized internet work area based on details that you provide in your COS Expertise profile. Presenter: Sarah Smith.

Word XP, Intermediate: April 12, 14, and 16, 9 a.m. to noon (nine hours total). Prerequisite: Word Beginning. Create and modify a template, create styles, work with columns, sections and advanced tables; add graphics, create mail merge documents, labels, and envelopes; manage documents. Presenter: Maria Saucedo.

Power Point XP, Beginning: April 13 and 15, 8:30 a.m to noon (seven hours total). Create presentations, add graphics and objects to slides, add tables and charts to slides, prepare a presentation, sort slides, add slide transitions, and animate text. Presenter: Maria Saucedo.

Health Insurance During Retirement: April 14, 1:30 to 3 p.m., 10-12 Swanson Hall. NDPERS health insurance and Medicare supplement for retirees will be discussed. This seminar is for both NDPERS and TIAA-CREF employees who are interested in staying on the NDPERS health insurance during retirement. Presenter: An NDPERS Benefit Program Administrator.

Pre-Retirement Planning for NDPERS Employees: April 14, 3 to 4:30 p.m., 10-12 Swanson Hall. An NDPERS benefit program administrator will discuss the NDPERS retirement plan.

— Julie Sturges, U2 program assistant, University within the University.

 
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ANNOUNCEMENTS
 

Ina Mae Rude Entrepreneur Center ready for construction

The Center for Innovation Foundation has raised $3.5 million to build a new entrepreneur center to double the size of their tech incubator, thanks to North Dakota Centers for Excellence funding provided by the Governor of North Dakota, the North Dakota Legislature and entrepreneurs Ray Rude and James Ray.

The Ina Mae Rude Entrepreneur Center will be adjacent to the Rural Technology Incubator, and will provide space for 50 additional emerging entrepreneurs, successful entrepreneurs serving as mentors and advisors, student entrepreneurs, and private investors interested in opportunities and helping startup ventures and innovators. There will also be a focus on innovation and seed capital to keep the Center for Innovation a leading entrepreneur center in the nation.

“The two facilities together will create an ongoing entrepreneur forum where all sectors of the entrepreneur community (new startups, successful entrepreneurs, advisors, investors, students etc,) come together in an intensive “boot camp-like” environment for creative deal making and to accelerate growth of ventures,” said Bruce Gjovig, director and entrepreneur coach for the Center for Innovation. In addition to doubling the office space for entrepreneurs, the Ina Mae Rude Entrepreneur Center will include a scientific laboratory space (wet lab) and a server farm for entrepreneurs who are technologists, engineers and scientists. A large conference room for 60-80 attendees will be dedicated for entrepreneur education and development through seminars, conferences, mini-trade shows, distance learning, online learning, etc. A special emphasis will be placed on the process of innovation, which adds value to ventures.

Ray Rude, native of Stanley and creator of the Duraflex diving board, provided a $1.5 million gift toward the Entrepreneur Center named for his late wife, Ina Mae Rude, who was his greatest supporter in his entrepreneur ventures. Mrs. Rude passed away in 2001 after 45 years of marriage and partnership in entrepreneur endeavors.

Aerospace entrepreneur and venture capitalist James Ray of Idaho donated $500,000 toward the entrepreneur center in addition to the $3.5 endowment gift he made in 2002. The project will be bid within the month and construction started in May. Completion is anticipated in December 2004.

— Bruce Gjovig, entrepreneur coach and director, Center for Innovation.

 

PeopleSoft navigation tutorials, training materials available

Future ConnectND users should take advantage of free PeopleSoft tutorials that show examples of how systems will look onscreen and provide navigation technology concepts and terminology.

Finance and human resource navigation tutorials can be accessed through the NDUS documentation and training web site. Find the heading “See Free PeopleSoft Tutorials” under microcomputer topics at http://www.und.edu/dept/cndtrain/. The site is also linked to the ConnectND home page. The tutorials can be taken online or downloaded onto a local computer, and the information can be accessed without logging onto the PeopleSoft site.

Faculty members can get information and brief demonstrations about online learning management, class schedules, class rosters and faculty advising under the Student Administration link on the training site.

In addition to familiarity with the tutorials, higher education staff and faculty users should also be comfortable with Internet skills (information available at http://www.und.edu/dept/cndtrain) and may be required to review records and data privacy information requirements (Family Educational Privacy Act, etc.) before they are granted security access to use ConnectND systems. Details on those security/privacy provisions are being finalized.

A variety of other resources to help prepare ConnectND users is on the web site and on the UND ConnectND site at www.und.edu/cnd. Personnel from Maximus, the project consulting firm, are working with higher education trainers and project managers to finalize details for functional training, to be conducted close to the time processes start up. Campus representatives are getting a head start through participation in testing of the various sytems.

 

Death noted of student Kayla Thompson

It is with regret that the University reports that Kayla Rose Thompson of Sheyenne, N.D., died Friday, March 12. She was admitted into UND the fall semester of 2001 and was a junior majoring in psychology.

– Lillian Elsinga, dean of students.

 

Faculty, researchers sought for UND experts directory

President Charles Kupchella is asking faculty and researchers to help “populate” the newly redesigned online UND experts directory. Created by the Office of University Relations, the web site is one of several ways in which UND will showcase its expertise and at the same time provide access to service. It will also be a resource that will allow colleagues, the media, and the public in general to connect to expertise on campus. The UND Experts Directory can be accessed at http://www.und.edu/experts. The site currently spotlights academic units and stand-alone research centers, but it will soon be modified to include non-academic service units.

The retooled web site now features a searchable database. For example, type in “gene” and the following names (added during various test phases) pop up in the database: David Bradley, Ann Flower, Mahesh Lakshman, John Martsolf, Peter Meberg, Roger Melvold, Darrin Muggli, Matthew Nilles, Kevin Young.

The process for getting into the database is simple. The online submission form is designed to allow faculty and researchers to cut and paste from their vita, or, if you prefer, type in fresh material. In addition to basic information (name, title, contact information, etc.), the form allows you to include information under the following categories:

Education, Publications, Consulting, Research, Grants, Special Presentations, Patents, Works in Progress

To participate, faculty and researchers can go to http://www.und.edu/experts/submit and begin filling in the form. Note that you will be asked to provide your NAID number (which will be kept confidential). This will allow you to modify your entry at a later date. Faculty members, for example, may want to update their entries when they provide their October supplements.

 

Electrical outages planned for several dates in April

The campus will experience several planned electrical outages to install three major generators. These generators will cut electricity costs and serve as emergency backups.

Please review the following dates and times and inform facilities of any major complications you may have. Please call Mark Johnson, 777-2336, with your concerns.

We realize this is a major inconvenience and ask your help and cooperation. It is imperative that the generators be installed prior to the air conditioning season to avoid major increases in our electrical costs.

The electrical outages to tie in the generators have been scheduled as follows:

FRIDAY, APRIL 9 (Good Friday holiday), 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. (eight hours)
All four circuits on campus, which include these buildings:

Circuit #1: Auxiliary Services, Building Mechanical Shop, Central Foods, Central Receiving, Chester Fritz Auditorium, Community Center/Daycare, Facilities, Gamble Hall, Housing Office, Odegard Hall, Recycling Building, Streibel Hall, Transportation/Grounds, West Green 1-14.

Circuit #2: Chester Fritz Library, Core and Sample Library, Old Engelstad Arena, Hyslop Sports Center, Law and Law Library, McCannel Hall, Memorial Stadium, Memorial Union, Montgomery Hall, O’Kelly/Ireland, Starcher Hall, Swanson Hall.

Circuit #3: Abbott Hall, Armory, Babcock Hall, Burtness Theatre, Carnegie Building, Chandler Hall, Education Building, Fulton Hall, Gillette Hall, Gustafson Hall, Harrington Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center, J. Lloyd Stone Alumni Center, Johnstone Hall, Leonard Hall, Merrifield Hall, North Dakota Museum of Art, President’s residence, Smith Hall, Steam Plant, Twamley Hall, Upson I, Upson II, Witmer Hall.

Circuit #4: Bek Hall, Brannon Hall, College of Nursing, Corwin/Larimore Hall, Hancock Hall, KUND Radio Tower, McVey Hall, North Dakota School for the Blind, Noren Hall, Robertson-Sayre Hall, Selke Hall, Squires Hall, Strinden Center, Walsh Hall, West Hall, Wilkerson Hall.

SATURDAY, APRIL 10 (Easter Saturday), 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. (12 hours)
Circuit #3: Abbott Hall, Armory, Babcock Hall, Burtness Theatre, Carnegie Building, Chandler Hall, Education Building, Fulton Hall, Gillette Hall, Gustafson Hall, Harrington Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center, J. Lloyd Stone Alumni Center, Johnstone Hall, Leonard Hall, Merrifield Hall, North Dakota Museum of Art, President’s residence, Smith Hall, Steam Plant, Twamley Hall, Upson I, Upson II, Witmer Hall.

SUNDAY, APRIL 18, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. (16 hours)
Circuit #4: Bek Hall, Brannon Hall, College of Nursing, Corwin/Larimore Hall, Hancock Hall, KUND Radio Tower, McVey Hall, North Dakota School for the Blind, Noren Hall, Robertson-Sayre Hall, Selke Hall, Squires Hall, Strinden Center, Walsh Hall, West Hall, Wilkerson Hall.

SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. (16 hours)
Circuit #2: Chester Fritz Library, Core and Sample Library, Old Engelstad Arena, Hyslop Sports Center, Law and Law Library, McCannel Hall, Memorial Stadium, Memorial Union, Montgomery Hall, O’Kelly/Ireland, Starcher Hall, Swanson Hall.

SATURDAY, MAY 22, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. (14 hours) and SUNDAY, MAY 23, 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. (14 hours)
Circuit #1: Auxiliary Services, Building Mechanical Shop, Central Foods, Central Receiving, Chester Fritz Auditorium, Community Center/Daycare, Facilities, Gamble Hall, Housing Office, Odegard Hall, Recycling Building, Streibel Hall, Transportation/Grounds, West Green 1-14.

— Larry Zitzow, director, facilities.

 

Fax project requests to 777-3071

The fax number at facilities for all projects and project-related information is 777-3071. Departments should not be sending any project requests or project questions to the old number.

– Gracie Dahl, facilities.

 

Children sought for reading comprehension study

A graduate student in the psychology department under the supervision of Tom Petros is seeking children ages 7 to 13 with no psychological diagnosis and/or are not currently taking any medication for a psychological diagnosis. The study is examining whether the time of day (either morning or afternoon) when a child is tested will affect how they perform on a variety of reading and listening comprehensive tests. The study takes approximately 90 minutes for both the parent and child. The child will be given several measures of listening and reading comprehension and the parent will be asked to fill out some questionnaires. The testing will take place at either 9 a.m. or 3 p.m. (weekend times are available) and the child will receive a $10 stipend for his/her time. If you are interested or would like additional information, please contact Shyla Muse in the psychology department at 777-3212, shyla.muse@und.nodak.edu.

— Jan Orvik, editor, for Shyla Muse, psychology graduate student.

 

Denim Day is last Wednesday of month

It’s the last Wednesday of the month – that means March 31 is Denim Day. Pay your dollar, wear your button, and “go casual.” All proceeds go to charity. Tired of watching other offices and buildings have all the fun? Call me and I’ll set you up with buttons and posters for your area.

– Patsy Nies, enrollment services, 777-3791, for the Denim Day committee.

 

Studio One lists features

Hearing aid specialist Brenda Haugen will discuss options for people who are hearing impaired on the next edition of Studio One. According to Haugen, hearing aids must be programmed differently for each user. We will learn how they work and the types available.

Also, the No Child Left Behind Act requires students to show improvement through standardized tests. Concerns have risen over the effectiveness of this act; we’ll hear opinions on this complex issue.

Studio One is an award-winning news and information program produced at the University of North Dakota Television Center. The program airs live Thursdays at 5 p.m. on UND Channel 3. Rebroadcasts can be seen at 7 a.m., noon, 7 p.m., and 11 p.m. daily and on Saturdays at 10 a.m. Prairie Public Television airs Studio One on Saturday at 6 a.m. The program can also be seen in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan, Minot, Minneapolis, the Portland, Ore., metro area, and Winnipeg, Manitoba.

– Studio One.

 

Remembering Manuel Mariano

Manuel J. Mariano, retired associate clinical professor of surgery, died March 19 in Altru Hospital of Grand Forks. He was 62.

Manuel Javier Mariano was born Sept. 22, 1941, in Taytay, Rizal, Philippines, to Dionisio and Florentina Mariano. He migrated to the United States in 1968.

In 1967 he received his medical education from the Manila Central University, Philippines. He served his internship at Swedish Hospital (now Metropolitan Medical Center) of Minneapolis from 1968 to 1969, his ophthalmology residency at Mayo Clinic of Rochester form 1970 to 1973, and received certification from the American Board of Ophthalmology in 1974.

He worked as an ophthalmologist at Grand Forks Clinic, later Altru, since May of 1973. He was an associate clinical professor of surgery at the medical school from 1980 to 2000.
His passion was conducting medical missions to the Philippines, which he had done for the last 14 years. He helped thousands of cataract patients, restoring eye sight to impoverished blind people of the Philippines.
He married Lilia Paz Zapanta on Oct. 23, 1968 at New Haven, Conn.

She survives along with children: Dr. M. Jerry (Jennifer Cirkl) Mariano, Grand Rapids, Minn.; L. Joyce Mariano, Minneapolis; Jeffrey Mariano, Minneapolis, and two grandchildren. Sisters: Dr. Geronoma J. Mariano, Philippines, Dr. Pacita M. (Dr. Wilberto) Lopez, Philippines, Rhodora M. (Leopoldo) Zapanta, Philippines, Virginia M. De Jesus, San Jose, Calif.

He was preceded in death by his parents and by a brother, Dr. Dionisio J. Mariano, and by sisters, Loreto Lechuga and Barbara Mariano.

Burial will be in the Holy Garden Memorial Cemetery of Taytay, Rizal, Philippines.

– Jan Orvik, editor, with information from the School of Medicine and Health Sciences and Grand Forks Herald.

 
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GRANTS & RESEARCH
 

February grant recipients named

The office of research and program development congratulates the following UND faculty and staff who were listed as principal or co-principal investigators on awards received in February:

Anthropology: Dennis Toom; atmospheric sciences: Michael Poellot; Center for Innovation: Bruce Gjovig; Center for Rural Health: Kyle Muus; Chester Fritz Auditorium: Betty Allen; Earth Systems Science Institute: George Seielstad; EERC: Eugene Balek, Steven Benson, Donald Cox, Daniel Daly, Thomas Erickson, Lucinda Hamre, John Harju, Michael Holmes, John Hurley, Dennis Laudal, Jason Laumb, Stanley Miller, John Pavlish, James Sorensen, Edward Steadman, Bradley Stevens, Michael Swanson, Jeffrey Thompson, Chad Wocken; HNRC: Glenn Lykken; internal medicine: Michiyo Tomita; pharmacology, physiology, and therapeutics: Colin Combs, Jonathan Geiger: Regional Weather Information Center: Bruce Smith; social work: Ralph Woehle; sociology-SSRI: Cordell Fontaine.

— William Gosnold, interim director, office of research and program development.

 

Funding opportunities will not run in University Letter as of July 1

We are approaching the end of the year of our conversion from the Sponsored Programs Information Network (SPIN) system to Community of Science (COS). COS, which has been provided by the ND State Board of Higher Education for all campuses, offers more extensive search capabilities than SPIN in addition to a variety of other services. The following text from the COS home page offers a brief description of the system:

“Community of Science, Inc. (COS) is the leading Internet site for the global R&D community. COS brings together the world’s most prominent scientists and researchers at more than 1,600 universities, corporations and government agencies worldwide. COS provides tools and services that enable these professionals to communicate, exchange information and find the people and technologies that are important to their work.

These services include: COS Expertise®, the database of detailed, first person profiles of more than 480,000 R&D professionals; COS Funding Opportunities™ the largest source of grant information on the Web; COS Abstract Management System™ an online publishing solution for universities and professional societies; and customized access to a range of professional reference databases including U.S. Patents, MEDLINE, AGRICOLA, and GeoRef, among others.”

For many years, ORPD staff have selected representative samples from funding opportunities for a variety of academic areas from the SPIN and COS systems, and we have published them in the University Letter. However, the number of funding opportunities that are available greatly exceeds the number we can publish each week. We are concerned that faculty seeking research opportunities may miss them simply because they do not see something of interest in the U-Letter. Consequently, as of July 1, we will change from listing a few samples of opportunities to encouraging faculty to subscribe to COS to receive announcements by e-mail or to conduct frequent searches for research opportunities using the COS system.

For faculty who would like help transitioning to COS, ORPD will offer regularly scheduled workshops in the use of COS beginning in March, 2004. Please check the U-Letter for the time and place for the workshops. A set of instructions for using COS can be found on the ORPD web page: http://www.und.edu/dept/orpd/ To access the instructions, select Funding Search Instructions on the web page.

— William Gosnold, interim director, Office of Research and Program Development

 

Research, grant opportunities listed

Following are research and grant opportunities. For additional information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278 or shirley_griffin@mail.und.nodak.edu.

Portions of the following data were derived from the Community of Science’s COS Funding OpportunitiesTM which is provided for the exclusive use of the University of North Dakota and may not be republished or made available outside the University of North Dakota in any form except via the COS Record ShareTM on the COS website.

AMERICAN FIBROMYALGIA SYNDROME ASSOCIATION (AFSA)
Research Grants support scientific research related to Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS), Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), and Myofacial Pain Syndrome (MPS) in order to discover better diagnostic tools and treatments. Deadline: None. Contact: Kristin Thorson, 520-733-1570; kthorson@afsafund.org; http://www.afsafund.org/grant.htm.

CANCER TREATMENT RESEARCH FOUNDATION (CTRF)
Clinical Investigation Grants support innovative research relevant to cancer therapy, clinical nutrition, quality of life, and cancer education. Young investigators working in established research programs relevant to clinical research who are without support from the NIH or other cancer research agencies are encouraged to apply. Deadline: None. Contact: Gary T. Anderson, 847-342-7450; grants@ctrf.org; http://www.ctrf.org/grantapp.cfm.

CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION (CDC)
Applied Research in Emerging Infections Investigations of West Nile Virus–Support for applied research efforts pertaining to West Nile virus and other arboviruses that occur in the US. Deadline: 5/15/04. Contact: John Roehrig, 970-221-6442; jtr1@cdc.gov; http://www.cdc.gov/od/pgo/funding/FAFBfinal1.pdf.

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION (ED)
Predoctoral Research Training–Support to develop innovative interdisciplinary training programs for doctoral students interested in conducting applied education research, and to establish a network of training programs to produce researchers willing and able to conduct methodologically rigorous and educationally relevant scientific research on problems and challenges facing American education. Deadline: 5/27/04. Contact: James Griffin, James.Griffin@ed.gov; or the website listed above.

Support for establishment of National Research and Development Centers which will focus on the following topic areas: rural education, postsecondary education, improving low-achieving schools, and innovation in education reform. Deadline: 5/27/04. Contact: See the complete announcement at: http://a257.g.akamaitech.net/7/257/2422/14mar20010800/edocket.access.gpo.gov/2004/04-2127.htm.

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE)
The Human Brain Project (Neuroinformatics): Phases I & II–Support for investigator-initiated, neuroinformatics research that will lead to new digital and electronic tools for all domains of neuroscience research reflecting normal and diseased states across the life span. Contact: Dean Cole, 301-903-3268; dean.cole@science.doe.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-03-035.html. Deadlines: 4/21/04, 8/20/04 (Letter of Intent); 5/21/04, 9/22/04 (Application).

DREYFUS FOUNDATION, INC., CAMILLE AND HENRY
New Faculty Awards, including an unrestricted research grant, support new faculty members at the start of their research and teaching activities in chemistry, chemical engineering, or biochemistry. Deadline: 5/13/04. Contact: Robert L. Lichter, 212-753-1760; admin@dreyfus.org; http://www.dreyfus.org/nf.shtml. NOTE: UND may submit only one application per year; therefore, please contact ORPD (7-4278 or shirley.griffin@mail.und.nodak.edu) if you are interested in applying.

HEALTH RESOURCES AND SERVICES ADMINISTRATION (HRSA)
Faculty Loan Repayment Program–In return for individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds serving as faculty at eligible health professions schools for a minimum of 2 years, the federal government will pay up to $20,000 of the outstanding principal and interest on the individual’s education loans for each year of service. Deadline: 5/28/04. Contact: Lorraine Evans, 301-443-0785; flrpinfo@hrsa.gov; http://bhpr.hrsa.gov/dsa/flrp/.

HUMAN GROWTH FOUNDATION (HGF)
Small Grants Program–Support for research on topics relevant to human growth and development, including but not limited to areas of biology, psychosocial, and nutrition, with special consideration given for the chondrodystrophies. Deadlines: 5/15/04 (Letter of Intent); 9/1/04 (Application). Contact: Small Grants Program, 1-800-451-6434; hgf1@hgfound.org; http://www.hgfound.org/smallgrants.html.

NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION (NASA)
Origins of Solar Systems–Support for basic research related to understanding the formation and early evolution of planetary systems and to provide fundamental research and analysis necessary to detect and characterize other planetary systems. Contact: David J. Lindstrom, 202-358-0311; David.J.Lindstrom@nasa.gov; http://research.hq.nasa.gov/code_s/nra/current/nnh04zss001n/appendB_4.html. Deadlines: 4/2/04 (Notice of Intent); 5/28/04 (Proposal).

Terrestrial Planet Finder Foundation Science–Support for fundamental research to further define the mission objects and potential targets for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission. Contact: Zlatan Tsvetanov, 202-358-0810; Zlatan.Tsvetanov@nasa.gov; http://research.hq.nasa.gov/code_s/nra/current/nnh04zss001n/appenda_12.html. Deadlines: See above.

in the School of Medicine are not eligible to apply for the award this year. Deadlines: 5/25/04, 9/25/04. Contact: Miriam Kelty, 301-496-9322; mk46u@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-03-053.html.

Development of Assays for High Throughput Drug Screening—Funding for development of innovative assays, that may be adapted for automated screening, to identify new tools for basic research and promising new avenues for therapeutics development, especially in areas related to the missions of NIDDK, NCI and NIAID. Contact: Rebekah S. Rasooly, 301-594-6007; rr185i@nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-068.html. Deadlines: 6/1/04, 10/1/04, 2/1/05.

Developmental Projects in Complementary Approaches to Cancer Care–Support for basic and clinical complementary cancer research and to provide the basis for more extended research projects by establishing methodological feasibility, strengthening scientific rationale for these projects, and collecting preliminary data. Contact: Wendy B. Smith, 301-435-7980; smithwe@mail.nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-053.html. Deadlines: 6/1/04, 10/1/04, 2/1/05.

Improving Care for Dying Children and Their Families–Support for research to improve quality of life for children who are approaching the end of life, the quality of the dying process, and bereavement following the death for the children’s families, friends and other care providers. Deadlines: 6/1/04, 10/1/04, 2/1/05. Contact: Alexis D. Bakos, 301-594-2542; bakosal@mail.nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-057.html.

Jointly Sponsored NIH Predoctoral Training Program in the Neurosciences–Support for broad, pre-thesis training programs in the neurosciences. Contact: Bradley C. Wise, 301-496-9350; wiseb@nia.nih.gov; Deadlines: 4/5/04 (Letter of Intent); 5/10/04 (Application). http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-02-017.html.

Mechanisms of Orofacial Pain: Anatomy, Genomics, and Proteomics–Support for studies using genomic and proteomic approaches and imaging techniques to clarify molecular events involved in acute orofacial pain. Deadlines: 4/19/04 (Letter of Intent); 5/14/04 (Application). Contact: John W. Kusiak, 301-594-7984; kusiakj@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DE-05-004.html.

Mental Health Consequences of Violence and Trauma–Support for research to enhance scientific understanding about the etiology of psychopathology related to violence and trauma, as well as studies to develop and test effective treatments, services, and prevention strategies in this area. Contact: LeShawndra Price, 301-443-5944; lprice@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-075.html. Deadlines: 6/1/04, 10/1/04, 2/1/05.

Molecular Markers and Mechanisms of HIV-Associated Dementia–Support for studies to identify and characterize novel molecular and genetic markers associated with distinct stages of progression of HIV-associated nervous system disease in the context of highly active anti-retroviral therapy. Contact: Jeymohan Joseph, 301-443-3012; jjeymoha@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-05-002.html. Deadlines: 4/12/04 (Letter of Intent); 5/11/04 (Application).

Nathan Shock Centers of Excellence in Basic Biology of Aging–Funding to establish centers to enhance
quality of research in the basic biology of aging, facilitate planning and coordination of aging research activities, provide support and a suitable environment for investigators new to aging research to acquire research skills and experience, and develop potential regional and/or national resource centers. Deadlines: 4/16/04 (Letter of Intent); 5/20/04 (Application). Contact: Huber R. Warner, 301-496-4996; warnerh@nia.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AG-04-010.html.

National Research Service Award Institutional Research Training Grants (NRSA)–Support to develop or enhance research training opportunities (predoctoral, postdoctoral, or short-term) for individuals training for careers in specified areas of biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research. Deadlines: 5/10/04, 9/10/04. Contact: See the complete announcement at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-02-109.html for areas of interest and contacts for the participating institutes/centers.

Neurovascular Mechanisms of Brain Function and Disease—Support to study the integration of neurobiological and cerebrovascular mechanisms in the adult, aged and pediatric brain in health and disease, especially studies focused on improving our understanding of the dynamic interactions within the neurovascular unit (NVU). Deadlines: 6/1/04, 10/1/04, 2/1/05. Contact: Thomas P. Jacobs, 301-496-1431; jacobst@ninds.nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAS-04-072.html.

Pathogenesis and Treatment of Lymphedema and Lymphatic Diseases–Support for research on the biology of the lymphatic system, to characterize at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and intact organism levels, the pathophysiologic mechanisms that cause the disease; to develop new methods for quantitating and imaging lymph flow; to discover new therapeutic interventions, and determine safety; efficacy and mechanisms of action of complementary and alternative therapies. Deadlines: 6/1/04, 10/1/04, 2/1/05. Contact: Henry Chang, 301-435-0067; changh@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-071.html.

Pharmacotherapy for Comorbid Alcohol and Drug Use Disorders–Support for state-of-the-art research to evaluate promising pharmacological treatments across a wide population of comorbid alcohol use disorder and substance abuse disorder subjects. Deadlines: 6/1/04, 10/1/04, 2/1/05. Contact: Charlene E. Le Fauve, 301-402-9401; clefauve@NIAAA.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-067.html.

Research Core Centers for Advanced Neuroinformatics Research–Support for shared coordinated resources to facilitate collaborative, interdisciplinary, and multidisciplinary efforts in neuroscience informatics (neuroinformatics). Deadlines: 5/21/04, 9/22/04. Contact: Stephen H. Koslow, 301-443-1815; koz@helix.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-03-037.html.

Research on Rural Mental Health and Drug Abuse Disorders–Support for research on mental health and/or drug abuse problems in rural and frontier communities that will: enhance understanding of structural, cultural, and individual factors that may limit provision and utilization of prevention and treatment services in these communities; and generate

in the School of Medicine are not eligible to apply for the award this year. Deadlines: 5/25/04, 9/25/04. Contact: Miriam Kelty, 301-496-9322; mk46u@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-03-053.html.

Development of Assays for High Throughput Drug Screening—Funding for development of innovative assays, that may be adapted for automated screening, to identify new tools for basic research and promising new avenues for therapeutics development, especially in areas related to the missions of NIDDK, NCI and NIAID. Contact: Rebekah S. Rasooly, 301-594-6007; rr185i@nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-068.html. Deadlines: 6/1/04, 10/1/04, 2/1/05.

Developmental Projects in Complementary Approaches to Cancer Care–Support for basic and clinical complementary cancer research and to provide the basis for more extended research projects by establishing methodological feasibility, strengthening scientific rationale for these projects, and collecting preliminary data. Contact: Wendy B. Smith, 301-435-7980; smithwe@mail.nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-053.html. Deadlines: 6/1/04, 10/1/04, 2/1/05.

Improving Care for Dying Children and Their Families–Support for research to improve quality of life for children who are approaching the end of life, the quality of the dying process, and bereavement following the death for the children’s families, friends and other care providers. Deadlines: 6/1/04, 10/1/04, 2/1/05. Contact: Alexis D. Bakos, 301-594-2542; bakosal@mail.nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-057.html.

Jointly Sponsored NIH Predoctoral Training Program in the Neurosciences–Support for broad, pre-thesis training programs in the neurosciences. Contact: Bradley C. Wise, 301-496-9350; wiseb@nia.nih.gov; Deadlines: 4/5/04 (Letter of Intent); 5/10/04 (Application). http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-02-017.html.

Mechanisms of Orofacial Pain: Anatomy, Genomics, and Proteomics–Support for studies using genomic and proteomic approaches and imaging techniques to clarify molecular events involved in acute orofacial pain. Deadlines: 4/19/04 (Letter of Intent); 5/14/04 (Application). Contact: John W. Kusiak, 301-594-7984; kusiakj@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-DE-05-004.html.

Mental Health Consequences of Violence and Trauma–Support for research to enhance scientific understanding about the etiology of psychopathology related to violence and trauma, as well as studies to develop and test effective treatments, services, and prevention strategies in this area. Contact: LeShawndra Price, 301-443-5944; lprice@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-075.html. Deadlines: 6/1/04, 10/1/04, 2/1/05.

Molecular Markers and Mechanisms of HIV-Associated Dementia–Support for studies to identify and characterize novel molecular and genetic markers associated with distinct stages of progression of HIV-associated nervous system disease in the context of highly active anti-retroviral therapy. Contact: Jeymohan Joseph, 301-443-3012; jjeymoha@mail.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-MH-05-002.html. Deadlines: 4/12/04 (Letter of Intent); 5/11/04 (Application).

Nathan Shock Centers of Excellence in Basic Biology of Aging–Funding to establish centers to enhance
quality of research in the basic biology of aging, facilitate planning and coordination of aging research activities, provide support and a suitable environment for investigators new to aging research to acquire research skills and experience, and develop potential regional and/or national resource centers. Deadlines: 4/16/04 (Letter of Intent); 5/20/04 (Application). Contact: Huber R. Warner, 301-496-4996; warnerh@nia.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AG-04-010.html.

National Research Service Award Institutional Research Training Grants (NRSA)–Support to develop or enhance research training opportunities (predoctoral, postdoctoral, or short-term) for individuals training for careers in specified areas of biomedical, behavioral, and clinical research. Deadlines: 5/10/04, 9/10/04. Contact: See the complete announcement at http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-02-109.html for areas of interest and contacts for the participating institutes/centers.

Neurovascular Mechanisms of Brain Function and Disease—Support to study the integration of neurobiological and cerebrovascular mechanisms in the adult, aged and pediatric brain in health and disease, especially studies focused on improving our understanding of the dynamic interactions within the neurovascular unit (NVU). Deadlines: 6/1/04, 10/1/04, 2/1/05. Contact: Thomas P. Jacobs, 301-496-1431; jacobst@ninds.nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAS-04-072.html.

Pathogenesis and Treatment of Lymphedema and Lymphatic Diseases–Support for research on the biology of the lymphatic system, to characterize at the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and intact organism levels, the pathophysiologic mechanisms that cause the disease; to develop new methods for quantitating and imaging lymph flow; to discover new therapeutic interventions, and determine safety; efficacy and mechanisms of action of complementary and alternative therapies. Deadlines: 6/1/04, 10/1/04, 2/1/05. Contact: Henry Chang, 301-435-0067; changh@nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-071.html.

Pharmacotherapy for Comorbid Alcohol and Drug Use Disorders–Support for state-of-the-art research to evaluate promising pharmacological treatments across a wide population of comorbid alcohol use disorder and substance abuse disorder subjects. Deadlines: 6/1/04, 10/1/04, 2/1/05. Contact: Charlene E. Le Fauve, 301-402-9401; clefauve@NIAAA.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-067.html.

Research Core Centers for Advanced Neuroinformatics Research–Support for shared coordinated resources to facilitate collaborative, interdisciplinary, and multidisciplinary efforts in neuroscience informatics (neuroinformatics). Deadlines: 5/21/04, 9/22/04. Contact: Stephen H. Koslow, 301-443-1815; koz@helix.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-03-037.html.

Research on Rural Mental Health and Drug Abuse Disorders–Support for research on mental health and/or drug abuse problems in rural and frontier communities that will: enhance understanding of structural, cultural, and individual factors that may limit provision and utilization of prevention and treatment services in these communities; and generate

knowledge to improve organization, financing, delivery, effectiveness, quality, and outcomes of mental health and drug abuse services for diverse populations in rural and frontier populations. Contact: Anthony Pollitt, 301-443-4525; apollitt@mail.nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-04-061.html. Deadlines: 6/1/04, 10/1/04, 2/1/05.

Supplements to Promote Reentry Into Biomedical and Behavioral Research Careers–Administrative supplements to research grants to support individuals with high potential to reenter an active research career after taking time off to care for children or attend to other family responsibilities. Deadline: None. Contact: Joyce Rudick, 301-402-1770; jr27q@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-081.html.

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF)
Evaluative Research and Evaluation Capacity Building (EREC) and Research on Learning and Education (ROLE)—Support for projects using unique approaches to evaluation practice in the generation of knowledge for the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education community and for broad policymaking within the research and education enterprise. Deadlines: 5/15/04 (EREC); 6/1/04, 12/12/04 (ROLE). Contact: James Dietz, 703-292-5156; jdietz@nsf.gov; http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf03542.

Instructional Materials Development (IMD)/Instructional Materials for Students–Funding in 3 areas: Instructional Materials for Students (creation and substantial revision of comprehensive curricula and supplemental instructional materials); Assessment (creation of tools for assessing student learning); and Applied Research (research for development of the IMD program and projects). Contact: John (Spud) Bradley, 703-292-5091; jbradley@nsf.gov; http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2004/nsf04562/nsf04562.htm. Deadlines: 5/10/04 (Pre-Proposal); 8/26/04 (Full Proposal).

Partnerships for Innovation (PFI)–Support for partnerships among academe, state, local, and federal government, and the private sector to explore new approaches to support and sustain innovation in the long term. Contact: John C. Hurt, 703-292-5332; jhurt@nsf.gov; http://www.nsf.gov/pubsys/ods/getpub.cfm?nsf04556. Deadline: 5/17/04. Note: UND may submit only two partnership applications per year and only one partnership proposal as the lead institution a year; therefore, please contact ORPD (7-4278 or shirley.griffin@mail.und.nodak.edu) if you are interested in applying.

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION (NSF)/U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE)
Interaction in Environmental Molecular Sciences–Supplements to existing NSF awards support research in the environmental molecular sciences at the DOE William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. Deadline: None. Contact: Allison Campbell, 509-376-6688; Allison.campbell@pnl.gov; http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2004/nsf04025/nsf04025.txt.

NORWAY-AMERICA ASSOCIATION - NORGE-AMERIKA FORENINGEN
Andrew E.G. Norman Wigeland Fund for Exchange Projects Between Norway and the U.S.–Support for collaborative projects between Norway and North America. Deadline: None. Contact: The Norway-America Association, Telephone +47 (23) 35-71-60; namerika@online.no; http://www.noram.no/amerikansk/add_sch.html.

SUNDANCE INSTITUTE
Sundance Documentary Fund–Support for documentary films and videos focusing on current and significant issues and movements in contemporary human rights, freedom of expression, social justice, and civil liberties. Deadline: None. Contact: Sundance Institute, sdf@sundance.org; http://institute.sundance.org/jsps/site.jsp?resource=pag_ex_programs_sdf_generalinfo&sk=OcRPwrIMtQtvyXER.

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI - KANSAS CITY
The following competitions are open to all writers. Submitted materials must be unpublished. Alexander Patterson Cappon Fiction Prize, for the best short story; Dorothy Churchill Cappon Creative Nonfiction Prize for the best piece of creative nonfiction; and the New Letters Poetry Prize for the best group of three to six poems. Deadline: 5/19/04. Contact: New Letters Literary Awards, http://www.newletters.org/awards.asp.

— William Gosnold, interim director, office of research and program development.

 
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UNIVERSITY LETTER is published weekly (bi-weekly during the summer) and distributed at no charge to members of the University community. It is also available electronically online at http://www.und.edu/dept/our/uletter. All articles submitted for publication should be labeled “University Letter” and must reach the editor by 1 p.m. Tuesday. Electronic submissions may be sent to jan_orvik@mail.und.nodak.edu or Fax to 777-4616. Attachments to University Letter require approval of the editor and an account number. University Letter is issued by the UND Office of University Relations, Jan Orvik, editor, Box 7144, 411 Twamley Hall, 777-2731.

UND is an equal opportunity/affirmative action institution.

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University Relations
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University of North Dakota
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Phone: 701-777-2731