University Letter

Volume 39, Number 31: April 5, 2002

Hanhan Will Oversee Assessment Of Student Learning, Achievement
Robert Lewis Gives Faculty Lecture On Hemingway
Expect Faculty Surveys Soon

EVENTS TO NOTE


English Faculty Lectures Planned
Biomedical Science Speaker Discusses Role Of Neurotrophins
Apartment Community Hosts Rummage Sale Saturday
Graduate Committee Meets Monday

Distinguished Lecturer Presents LEEPS Lecture April 8
Multicultural Awareness Week Is April 8-12
Women’s Center Offers Self-Defense Class
Native American Activist, Artist Gives Elaine McKenzie Memorial Lecture
Contemporary Native American Art Shows At Museum
IT Forum Discusses Improving Multimedia And Online Courses
Meetings Will Discuss Graduate Faculty Constitution
Doctoral Examination Set For Scott Randall
CVIC Representative Presents “Meet And Eat” Program
International Centre Hosts Thursday Cultural Programs
Campus Celebrates First Festival Of Women In The Arts
“Diamonds Are Not Forever” Presented By LEEPS Lecturer
Honors Research Conference Set For April 15
Video Conference Focuses On Alcohol Interventions
President Kupchella To Speak At Wellness Coalition Luncheon
DSS Invites All To Reception Honoring Access Champions, Scholarship Winners
Museum Sponsors Conference On Community-Making Through Arts
Faculty Member Shows Wall Hangings At Empire

ANNOUNCEMENTS


Fall, Summer Time Schedules Are Now Online
Employees May Enroll In Courses At Low Cost
Policy Does Not Permit Smoking Near Entrances, Exits
Payroll Office Provides Information Regarding International Employees
Studio One Features Senior Citizen Web Site, Award-Winning School
Traffic Division Issues Parking Reminders
University Bookstore Seeks Temporary Employees
Upcoming U2 Workshops Listed
Public Health Department Offers Free Blood Pressure Checks, More

GRANTS AND RESEARCH


Scholarly Activities Committee Makes Awards
January, February Awardees Listed
Research, Grant Opportunities Listed


Hanhan Will Oversee Assessment Of Student Learning, Achievement
Associate Provost Sara Hanhan has been given responsibility and authority for overseeing the assessment of student learning and achievement at UND. Although assessment of student learning and achievement is located largely in the division of academic affairs, the Higher Learning Commission (formerly NCA) which accredits the University, views student learning and achievement as occurring throughout all aspects of students’ campus lives. As associate provost, Dr. Hanhan reports to the vice president for academic affairs, but this new responsibility will include oversight of assessment activities for the entire campus. The senate’s university assessment committee will work in an advisory capacity to Dr. Hanhan.

As reported earlier, a steering committee and a number of sub-committees have been established to conduct the re-accreditation self study for the University. If Dr. Hanhan or members of these committees contact you, please give them your full cooperation. A successful accreditation process involves everyone on campus. If you have questions about your role in the assessment of student learning and achievement, please contact Dr. Hanhan at 777-4824. – Charles Kupchella, President.

 

Robert Lewis Gives Faculty Lecture On Hemingway
“Life with Hemingway, or, Riding Papa’s Coattails on the Academe Express” is the next talk in the faculty lecture series. Robert Lewis, Chester Fritz Distinguished Professor Emeritus of English and Peace Studies, will give the lecture Tuesday, April 9, 4:30 p.m. in the Fred Orth Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union. A reception begins at 4 p.m., and a question and answer period follows.

Robert Lewis has specialized in American literature with emphasis on the works of Ernest Hemingway. He received his B.A. from the University of Pittsburgh, his M.A. from Columbia University and his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois. Prior to joining UND’s faculty in 1969, Lewis taught at the University of Nebraska, the University of Illinois, the University of Texas and the University of Catania, Italy.

Lewis is listed in International “Authors and Writers Who’s Who” and the “Directory of American Scholars.” He also taught as a Fulbright-Hayes Professor of American Studies at Ain Shams University in Cairo, Egypt, and has served as coordinator of both American studies and peace studies at UND.

His books include Hemingway on Love, Hemingway in Italy and Other Essays, and “A Farewell to Arms”: The War of the Words. He has edited North Dakota Quarterly since 1982 and chaired the department of English from 1969 to 1978 and 1996 to 2001. He was president of the Hemingway Society from 1987 to 1992, and he continues work on Hemingway’s writings.

The faculty lecture series seeks to cultivate a stronger academic atmosphere on the UND campus by showcasing the scholarly lives of several faculty selected across the disciplines. The lecture series aims to present with some depth and rigor the scholarly questions and goals of the individual faculty. In presenting the products of their scholarship, the lecture will share the enthusiasm and dedication that sustains their creative efforts.


Expect Faculty Surveys Soon
A second wave of the University of California Los Angeles, Higher Education Research Institute faculty survey packets will be mailed out in a couple of weeks. This survey provides important information on faculty perceptions within the system – it will even be used to provide legislatively mandated accountability information on faculty satisfaction. The higher the response rate, the more complete and credible the report becomes. Thanks to your support our response rate is already “substantially above average.”

Faculty are encouraged to respond to the survey. Confidentiality is assured and the results are used; see http://www.ndus.edu/reports/details.asp?id-284

A few highlights from the previous faculty survey:

• The primary interest and principal activity of faculty in North Dakota’s 11 public institutions was teaching, and their highest goal was to be good teachers.
• North Dakota faculty spent significantly more time in the classroom and on teaching-related activities than did their peers nationally. Faculty in the five two-year institutions expended the most time.
• North Dakota faculty spent significantly less time on research than do their peers nationwide, particularly in the doctorate-granting institutions. Thus, North Dakota faculty tend to be published less than faculty nationwide.
• The average North Dakota faculty member spent over 50 hours per week on job-related activities (51.6 hours per week for doctorate institutions, 53.2 hours for four-year, and 54.0 hours for two-year). North Dakota faculty were generally using information technology more than their peers nationally, specifically for communicating by e-mail.
• North Dakota faculty were, overall, less satisfied with their jobs than faculty nationally, particularly in the area of salary and benefits.
• Time pressures created the greatest stress for faculty, followed by lack of personal time, institutional procedures and “red tape.” NDUS faculty at doctorate-granting institutions also indicated the review and promotion process and the research and publishing demands as being highly stressful.
• The number one goal North Dakota faculty had for their undergraduate students was to develop their ability to think clearly.

Also, we would like to again contract with a faculty member or graduate student to produce the 2002 NDUS Faculty Survey report. Those interested may contact me at michel.hillman@ndus.nodak.edu. – Michel Hillman, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, North Dakota University System, submitted by James Grijalva (Law), faculty adviser to the State Board of Higher Eduction.

 

EVENTS TO NOTE

 

English Faculty Lectures Planned
Joyce Coleman (English) will present “Cicero Lecturing at the Sorbonne: Why Anachronism Doesn’t Matter in Late Medieval Manuscript Illumination,” at 4 p.m. Thursday, April 4, in 116 Merrifield Hall.
On Thursday, April 11, Elizabeth Hampsten (English) will consider “A Tupamaro Raid, Thirty Years After,” also at 4 p.m. in 116 Merrifield Hall. – Kathleen Dixon, English.

 

Biomedical Science Speaker Discusses Role Of Neurotrophins
The Foundations of Biomedical Science Speaker this week on Thursday and Friday, April 4 and 5, is Frank Rice from Albany Medical College. He will present a talk Thursday, April 4, at noon in 5510 School of Medicine and Health Sciences, on “The Role of Neurotrophins and Suppressing Factors in the Development of Cutaneous Innervation.” Dr. Rice will give another seminar at 1 p.m. Friday, April 5, in the same room titled “When Good Innervation Goes Bad: A Peripheral Basis for Neuropathic Pain.” All talks are open to the University community and to the public. For more information, or to meet with Dr. Rice during his stay on campus, please contact Bryon Grove in the department of anatomy and cell biology at 777-2101. – Jon Jackson (Anatomy and Cell Biology), Foundations of Biomedical Science Seminar coordinator.

 

Apartment Community Hosts Rummage Sale Saturday
The apartment community center spring rummage sale is this Saturday, April 6, from 9 a.m. to noon at 525 Stanford Road, in the same building as the University children’s center. – Jan Orvik, Editor, for Malia Young, Apartment Community.

 

Graduate Committee Meets Monday
The Graduate Committee will meet Monday, April 8, from 3:05 to 5 p.m. in 305 Twamley Hall. The agenda will include:

1. Approval of minutes from March 25, 2002.
2. New Ph.D. program request in space studies.
3. Matters arising.
– Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School.

 

Distinguished Lecturer Presents LEEPS Lecture April 8
Roger Slatt of the University of Oklahoma will present a LEEPS (Leading Edge Earth and Planetary Sciences) lecture at noon Monday, April 8, in 100 Leonard Hall. His lecture, “Outcrop/Behind-Outcrop Characterization of Deepwater (Turbidite) Petroleum Reservoir Analogs: Why and How.” Dr. Slatt is a distinguished lecturer for the American Association of Petroleum Geologists. Everyone is welcome. Please contact me for more information. – Scott Korom, scott_korom@mail.und.nodak.ed, Geology and Geological Engineering.

 

Multicultural Awareness Week Is April 8-12
The Multicultural Awareness Committee (MAC) presents Multicultural Awareness Week, April 8-12. The schedule follows.

Monday, April 8: Union Celebration, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., first floor, Memorial Union. Free giveaways from MAC; Friendships Across Cultures, 4 p.m., Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union. Open discussion on cultural differences and making friendships.

Tuesday, April 9: Calle Sur, 7 p.m., Tabula Coffeehouse. Latin American musical group performing a dynamic mix of acoustic flavors from Latin America and the Caribbean.

Wednesday, April 10: Progressive Meal, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., UND Cultural Centers; Dan Renzi (of MTV’s The Real World), 7 p.m., Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union. In his presentation, “Three Lessons to Learn,” Dan tells the story of growing up gay in the Midwest.

Thursday, April 11: Engelstad Arena Issues, 4 p.m., former bookstore space, Memorial Union. An open discussion on the effect of the Engelstad Arena on the UND Campus.
– Susan Johnson, Coordinator, Student Organizations, Memorial Union.

 

Women’s Center Offers Self-Defense Class
The Women’s Center still has space available for their IMPACT self-defense basics class for women. This 20-hour program will teach you simple and effective physical, verbal, and psychological self-defense techniques. You’ll learn to minimize your “freeze” response and respond effectively in an adrenalized state, practicing your new skill with padded mock assailants in realistic scenarios. The dates and times are as follows: Mondays, April 8, 15, 22, 29 and Wednesday, May 1, from 6 to 10 p.m. The cost is $25 for students, faculty and staff. Please call the Women’s Center to register or for more information about this class. – Kay Mendick, Director, Women’s Center.


Native American Activist, Artist Gives Elaine McKenzie Memorial Lecture
Native American artist Edgar Heap of Birds, a Cheyenne-Arapaho from Oklahoma who has received world-wide recognition as a ground-breaking political activist and artist, will give the Elaine McKenzie Memorial Lecture at the North Dakota Museum of Art Tuesday, April 9, at 7:30 p.m. The talk, “From Personal to Political and Back Again: The Thirty Year Evolution of the Diverse Art Works of Hachivi Edgar Heap of Birds,” is open to the general public without charge.

The Elaine McKenzie memorial lecture is an annual museum event which honors Elaine McKenzie, a founding staff member of the Museum, and, in the words of the Museum Director, Laurel Reuter, “. . . one of the world’s loveliest women, a person with an educated heart.” Elaine Kai McKenzie was a Cantonese from Hawaii with a degree in literature from the University of Hawaii. Family and friends have established an Elaine McKenzie memorial endowment within the North Dakota Museum of Art Foundation, which funds the lecture.

Hachivi Edgar Heap of Birds represents the oldest generation in an exhibit of contemporary Native American art, Cross Generational, which opens at the Museum at 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 9. Four Native American artists are included in the exhibition, which runs through June 2. His works reflect the “constructive and destructive politics of daily life.” They are based in a broad range of media from large-scale marker drawings, prints, abstract paintings, and text messages deployed in sculpture through billboards, digital signs, traffic panels, and porcelain enamel on steel.

Heap of Birds has presented public art commissions and had solo and group exhibitions in Australia, Hong Kong, North America, Puerto Rico, Ireland and England. He has also served as a visiting artist/lecturer throughout the United States, in Western Samoa, South Africa, and in aboriginal colleges and institutions in Australia and Spain. He is one of the leaders of the Tsistsistas (Cheyenne) traditional elk warrior society, and is the recipient of numerous grants and awards, including those from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Rockefeller Foundation, and the Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation.

The artist has presented public art commissions at Times Square in New York City, the Banff Center in Alberta, as well as in various other places including Seattle, Vancouver, Sante Fe, and Northern Ireland. A selection of solo exhibitions includes such prestigious venues as The Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston, Exit Art in New York City, the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and Matt’s Gallery in London.

For more information, please call 777-4195. The North Dakota Museum of Art is located on Centennial Drive on the campus of the University of North Dakota. Hours are from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and from 1 to 5 p.m. at the weekends. The Museum Café is open from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. weekdays with lunch from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., and at weekends from 1 to 5 p.m. – North Dakota Museum of Art.

 

Contemporary Native American Art Shows At Museum
“Cross Generational,” an exhibition of work by contemporary Native American artists John Hitchcock, Edgar Heap of Birds, Rosalie Favell and Patricia Marroquin, will open Tuesday, April 9. At 5 p.m. that day, John Hitchcock will give an informal gallery talk which will be followed at 6 p.m. by an open buffet dinner. At 7:30 p.m., Edgar Heap of Birds will deliver the Elaine McKenzie Memorial Lecture, “From Personal to Political and Back Again: The Thirty Year Evolution of the Diverse Art Works of Hachivi Edgar Heap of Birds.”

“Cross Generational” will bring together the work of four contemporary Native American artists from the plains states who are at varying stages in their artistic careers and in their experiences and lives. Participating artist John Hitchcock has selected the artists for the exhibition.

John Hitchcock’s current work blends printmaking, digital imaging, video, and installation. The social and political views in his work are a direct result of stories shared by family members and issues regarding living on Kiowa/Comanche lands in Oklahoma. His art is involved in the ideas of loss of language, spiritual beliefs, and culture due to the influence of Indian boarding schools, welfare programs, the notion of assimilation and control that is reinforced through government systems, etc.

Hitchcock is assistant professor of printmaking at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he teaches screenprinting and relief cut. He earned his M.F.A. in printmaking and photography at Texas Tech University, Lubbock, and received his B.F.A. from Cameron University, Lawton, Okla. He previously taught at the University of Minnesota, Morris. He will create a new print in the art department here as part of a program designed by Kim Fink which introduces artists visiting the Museum to UND printmaking students.

Edgar Heap of Birds, one of America’s leading Native American artists, represents the oldest generation in the exhibition. See the preceding article on the Elaine McKenzie Memorial Lecture for more information on him.

Rosalie Favell, of Metis descent, is a photographer whose work has appeared in more than a dozen solo exhibitions and more than 20 group exhibitions in venues including Glasgow, Scotland, Santiago, Chile, and Taiwan. Her formative years were spent in her hometown of Winnipeg. A graduate of Ryerson Polytechnical Institute in Toronto, Ms. Favell holds a M.F.A. from the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. A former professor of photography at the Institute of American Indian Art in Sante Fe and a lecturer at the University of Manitoba, Favell currently teaches at the White Mountain Academy near Thunder Bay, Ontario.

Patricia Marroquin, the youngest artist in the exhibition, is finishing a M.F.A. degree from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in video production, photography and printmaking. She will exhibit her newest video installation in the exhibition. She is of Chicana/Tarassan/Apache background, born and raised in Chicago by a family of migrant farmers, factory workers, and entrepreneurs of combined Native American and Mexican descent. She graduated with a B.A. from Clark College in Iowa in printmaking.

In conjunction with the opening of the exhibition, Museum director Laurel Reuter will conduct a two-day teachers and scholars seminar through continuing education for 20 enrolled public school teachers April 9-10. The artists will meet with the group. – North Dakota Museum of Art.

IT Forum Discusses Improving Multimedia And Online Courses
The division of continuing education, the center for instructional and learning technologies and information technology systems and services are pleased to announce the final forum in the three-part PBS series on instructional technology survival skills. The third forum is titled “Improving Multimedia and Online Courses with Instructional Design,” and will be held from 3 to 4 p.m. Wednesday, April 10, in the River Valley Room, Memorial Union. UND faculty and staff from across campus will serve as panelists and facilitate a discussion about how to incorporate basic instructional design principles, technology and adult learning theory into college courses.

Good faculty members are always looking for ways to teach more effectively. Recently, that task has become more demanding due to new types of instructional technologies and the changing demographics of college students. The rapid growth of new learning technologies and various teaching environments create new challenges when one considers how to incorporate sound instructional design. More than ever, today’s educators require a framework for creating instruction that will benefit students of all ages and will work well regardless of the multimedia tools and course delivery systems used. This instructional technology forum will address the basic principles of instructional design and other “how-to” ideas for adapting teaching methods to accommodate different learning styles and changing classroom environments.

Faculty and staff are invited to attend. Questions can be directed to CK Braun (Continuing Education) at 777-6403 or Lori Swinney (CILT) at 777-3569. – CK Braun, Curriculum Designer for Online Instruction, Continuing Education.

 

Meetings Will Discuss Graduate Faculty Constitution
Joseph Benoit, dean of the graduate school, invites graduate faculty to two meetings in April to discuss the graduate faculty constitution Wednesday, April 10, at 4 p.m. and Tuesday, April 30, at 4 p.m., both in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. The first meeting will be a general meeting of the graduate faculty to review and discuss a draft of the graduate faculty constitution. At the second meeting there will be further discussion and a vote on the constitution. An agenda will be published prior to the graduate faculty meetings. A quorum will be needed for the vote. According to the current constitution, one-fifth of the membership of the graduate faculty constitutes a quorum. A draft of the graduate faculty constitution can be found on the graduate school’s web page at http://www.und.edu/dept/grad/. For further information, contact Staci Matheny at 777-2786. – Cynthia Shabb, Graduate School.

 

Doctoral Examination Set For Scott Randall
The final examination for Scott Randall, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in English, is set for 2:30 p.m. Thursday, April 11, in 303 Twamley Hall. The dissertation title is “Piano Letters.” James Robison (English) is the committee chair. Members of the Graduate Faculty are invited to attend. – Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School.


CVIC Representative Presents “Meet And Eat” Program
The Thursday, April 11, noon Meet and Eat program at the Women’s Center will be “Talking about Sexual Assault.” Laura Nash-Fritsch, campus advocate with CVIC (Community Violence Intervention Center) will share a video titled “Small Justice,” a documentary of several court cases involving child sexual abuse and domestic violence. She will also share what is happening in the Grand Forks community in response to some of these issues. Lunch will be provided. April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. – Patty McIntyre, Women’s Center.

 

International Centre Hosts Thursday Cultural Programs
The International Centre will host cultural programs at 7 p.m. Thursdays in the centre, 2908 University Ave. The April 11 program will feature Turkey. Everyone is invited. – Office of International Programs, 777-4231.

 

Campus Celebrates First Festival Of Women In The Arts
The first festival of women in the arts will take place Thursday through Saturday, April 11-13, on campus. The festival celebrates the contribution of women to the arts, with the participation of UND music faculty, students and artists from the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra and the Royal Winnipeg Ballet.

The schedule follows:

First recital: “Media Tango,” Thursday, April 11, 7:30 p.m., in the Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center. This is an interdisciplinary evening of chamber music, modern dance, video and choral music. The program includes: “Petroushskates” by Joan Tower and “Secret de polichenelle” by Ana Sokolovic, featuring Elizabeth Rheude, clarinet, James Popejoy, conductor and members of the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra; “Recitations” by Georges Aperghis, featuring Therese Costes and dancers from the Royal Winnipeg Ballet Professional School; videos by Val Klassen, Jacky Sawatzky, Elvira Finnigan and Terry Billings; and “Os Justi” by Eleanor Daley, “Missa Brevis” by Nancy Telfer and “Alleluia” by Emma Lou Diemer, featuring Allegro, conducted by Nolan Long.

Second recital: “Words on Stage,” Friday, April 12, 7:30 p.m., in the North Dakota Museum of Art. This is an evening of chamber music featuring a world premiere by Michael Wittgraf (theory and composition at UND). The program includes: “Corker” by Libby Larsen, featuring clarinetist Elizabeth Rheude and Winnipeg percussionist Robert Gardner; “Etudes” by Gyorgy Ligeti, featuring Winnipeg pianist Cheryl Pauls; “Ariel” by Ned Rorem, featuring Anne Christopherson, soprano, Elizabeth Rheude, clarinet and Lisa Blackledge-Anderson, piano; “Meditation and Hoolerai” by Michael Wittgraf, featuring clarinetist Elizabeth Rheude, cellist Nick Bryne and pianist Cheryl Pauls; “Asian Figures” by Edith Hemenway, featuring clarinetist Elizabeth Rheude and Lisa Blackledge-Anderson, piano; and “Old Angel Midnight” by Douglas Schmidt, featuring Therese Costes, soprano, Robert Gardner, percussion and Cheryl Pauls, piano. Admission is $5 for general admission, $3 for students.

Third concert: “She Said, He Said,” Saturday, April 13, 2 p.m. in the Josephine Campbell Recital Hall, Hughes Fine Arts Center. A concert of opera and music theater presented by the UND opera workshop, directed by Anne Christopherson, featuring well-known favorites and a chamber opera by Seymour Barab. No admission is charged.

Fourth concert: “Cabaret,” April 13, 7:30 p.m. in the Tabula Coffee House. The closing party features Michael Blake and Jazz on Tap, James Popejoy, and Rhyme or Reason with Stefan Bauer, Kelly Marques and Therese Costes. No admission is charged. – Elizabeth Rheude, Associate Professor of Clarinet, Music.

 

“Diamonds Are Not Forever” Presented By LEEPS Lecturer
Catherine McCammon, a lecturer for the Mineralogical Society of America, originally from Winnipeg and now at the Universitaet Bayreuth in Germany, will present two LEEPS (Leading Edge Earth and Planetary Sciences) lectures Friday, April 12.

Her noon lecture in 100 Leonard Hall is titled, “Diamonds are Not Forever: How Compositional Zoning in Garnets Can Tell Us Why.” At 3 p.m. in 109 Leonard Hall, she will consider, “Oxidation-Reduction in the Earth: What Old Cars and the Lower Mantle Have in Common.” Everyone is welcome.
Please contact m for more information. – Scott Korom, scott_korom@mail.und.nodak.edu, Geology and Geological Engineering.

 

Honors Research Conference Set For April 15
Mark your calendars! The fourth annual honors program undergraduate research conference will take place Monday, April 15, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the East Asian Room at the Chester Fritz Library. Over the past year, accomplished students from all over campus have completed a senior honors thesis. This conference provides a place for students (whether members of the honors program or not) to showcase their accomplishments and share their thesis projects with the community. Thesis students represent a wide variety of disciplines, and their topics range from an analysis of language translation, to a look at the co-existence of Christianity and materialism, to the study and analysis of heart cell depression – and much more.

This event is free and open to the public; please feel free to attend one or more sessions. All students and faculty are encouraged to come and watch the presentations, either as part of an approved class project or simply to experience undergraduate research.

For more information, contact the honors program, 777-2219, visit our web site at www.und.edu/dept/honors, or check out the URC link at http://www.und.edu/dept/honors/Thesis/URC.htm. – Jeanne Anderegg, Coordinator, Honors Program.

 

Video Conference Focuses On Alcohol Interventions
A live satellite video conference, “Alcohol Interventions in College Communities: Building Healthy Campus Communities,” will be held Monday, April 15, from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. It will include practical advice about conducting a needs assessment, building campus/community coalitions, coordinating with police enforcement and judicial review, promoting responsible student behavior using the latest environmental strategies and social-norms marketing, promoting non-alcohol events and substance-free housing on and off campus, establishing landlord model contracts to reach students off campus, and establishing vendor agreements and server training. Sponsors include: NASPA/student affairs administrators in higher education, the University of Vermont, A Matter of Degree, UND office of the vice president for student and outreach services, UND dean of students office, UND crisis coordination team, UND office of substance abuse prevention, and UND student health services. For information, contact me. – Jane Croeker, Student Health Promotion Office, Student Health Services, 777-4817, jane_croeker@und.nodak.edu.

 

President Kupchella To Speak At Wellness Coalition Luncheon
Students, faculty, and staff are invited to attend the spring 2002 Healthy UND wellness coalition meeting at noon Tuesday, April 16, in the Memorial Union Lecture Bowl. A luncheon will be served in the Memorial Union Sioux Room at 11:30 a.m. The agenda includes comments by President Kupchella on his vision of wellness, a report from student government leaders Matt Brown and Mike Cleveland, and a presentation by Phil Harmeson on the proposed plans to renovate Hyslop Sports Center for a wellness center. Please RSVP for the luncheon by contacting Phyllis Norgren, student health promotion office, 777-2097, phyllis.norgren@und.nodak.edu, before Friday, April 12. – Jane Croeker, Student Health Promotion Office, Student Health Services.

 

DSS Invites All To Reception Honoring Access Champions, Scholarship Winners
Disability support services invites University faculty, administrators and staff to attend a reception honoring the 2001-2002 access champions and recipients of the Sondrol, McSparron and Morrison scholarships. Please join us Tuesday, April 16, for refreshments between 3 and 3:30 p.m. in the Fireside Lounge, second floor, Memorial Union, and for the presentation of awards at 3:30 p.m.

Each year, DSS staff and students with disabilities recognize individual faculty and staff who have done an exceptional job of providing access to students with disabilities. Criteria for selection include providing accommodations in a fair, respectful way; holding students to the same academic standards as expected of others; maintaining a friendly, respectful and inclusive environment so students are comfortable asking for accommodations; and designing a new or creative way to provide access to students. – Disability Support Services, 777-3425.

 

Museum Sponsors Conference On Community-Making Through Arts
“Celebrating the Poetry of Place,” a regional conference on community-making through the arts, will take place Tuesday and Wednesday, April 16 and 17, at the North Dakota Museum of Art.

The museum is sponsoring the two-day conference to examine the life-changing, community-making process of rural arts programs and institutions. If we are to grow our communities, we must understand the vital role that rural arts will play in North Dakota and Minnesota in this century. Four of the country’s leaders in creating small, stellar arts entities will be in Grand Forks to participate in the conference. Their work demonstrates that collaboration, inventiveness, resilience, and tenacity underlie all successful rural arts endeavors, including the remarkable development of community theater in the Red River Valley in the early years of the 20th century – the subject of LaMoine MacLaughlin’s presentation. They will be joined by Arthur Greenberg and Carol May, consultants from AMS Planning and Research, who are investigating the potential of establishing a collaborative marketing initiative in Grand Forks that could have region-wide impact.

The opening session on Tuesday, April 16, begins at 6 p.m. with registration and wine and hors d’oeuvres. A buffet dinner is scheduled for 6:30 p.m., followed by Steve Duchrow’s dramatic presentation of the Illinois poet Vachel Lindsay who roamed the countryside handing out his poetry book, Rhymes Traded for Bread. Duchrow’s professional research into the community arts movement in rural and small communities led him to development of his impersonation of one of the early 20th century’s leading poets.

Wednesday’s events (April 17) will open at 9 a.m. with facilitator Patrick Overton, and continue until 3:30 p.m. Overton is director of the Front Porch Institute in Astoria, Ore., and author of Rebuilding the Front Porch of America: Essays on the Art of Community Making.

Other speakers include John Davis, visionary arts organizer, who founded the New York Mills Arts Retreat and Regional Cultural Center and created the great American think-off, a philosophy contest in New York Mills, Minn., that has garnered national media attention. In 2002, Davis moved to Lanesboro in southeast Minnesota and launched the kids philosophy slam. He will be joined by LaMoine MacLaughlin, co-founder and executive director of the Northern Lakes Center for the Arts and the Northern Lakes School of the Arts located in Amery, Wis. The center has been included in the book, The 100 Best Small Arts Towns in America, and described by the executive director of the Wisconsin Arts Board as “. . . one of Wisconsin’s most vibrant arts organizations.” Scheduled as luncheon speakers are Arthur Greenberg and Carol May who are working in Greater Grand Forks conducting a collaborative marketing survey.

Trustees, board members, volunteers and paid staff of arts organizations of all sizes, as well as individuals interested in economic development, quality of life issues, and rural population drain will find the conference of interest. For more information, call the North Dakota Museum of Art at 777-4195.

Registration fee is $20, which includes the buffet dinner and Wednesday’s luncheon, or $15 for Tuesday evening and $10 for Wednesday’s events. Call the Museum to register: 777-4195, or e-mail, ndmuseum@infi.net, att: Brian Lofthus. The conference is organized by the North Dakota Museum of Art with funding from the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. – North Dakota Museum of Art.

 

Faculty Member Shows Wall Hangings At Empire
Anita Monsebroten (art, fibers) will present an exhibition of woven wall hangings dealing with the historical theme of the Jeep. “Jeep-Works,” an art show celebrating an American legend, will be on exhibit through Wednesday, May 1, at the Empire Art Center Gallery, 415 DeMers Ave. An opening reception will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. Sunday, April 14. The exhibition is open other times by appointment; phone 746-5500.

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

 

Fall, Summer Time Schedules Are Now Online
The time schedule of classes for summer and fall 2002 are now available on the web. Also, students may now find out their date and time of registration by going to web ALFI at www.und.edu/dept/registrar or by calling phone ALFI at 777-3693.

The printed version of the 2002 summer and fall time schedules used by departments for advising purposes are now available for pickup in the reception area of the office of the registrar.
If you have questions, please call 777-2712. – Michael Cogan, Associate Registrar.


Employees May Enroll In Courses At Low Cost
For just $4.17 per credit hour, UND employees may enroll in University classes. You may take up to three academic courses each calendar year, and may be granted work release time for one academic class per school session after receiving approval from your supervisor for release time during working hours. You must have successfully completed your probationary period. You can continue your education, earn a degree, or improve your skills. Staff members may work toward a degree; faculty may take courses for credit. Both faculty and staff members may audit courses.

You can choose from hundreds of courses, ranging from management and sciences to languages and music, from exercise and ceramics to first aid and financial management. Here’s how to enroll:

1. Pick up admissions materials, registration materials and a tuition waiver form at the Office of Admissions, 205 Twamley Hall (phone 777-3821) or at the Graduate School, 414 Twamley Hall (777-2784).

2. Choose the course you’d like to take. Prerequisites or other factors may affect registration.

3. Fill out the forms and have your supervisor/dean sign the tuition waiver forms. Return them to Admissions (undergraduates) or the Graduate School. Return the completed waiver forms to Admissions. The deadline for filing the waiver is Friday, May 3, for the summer session, and Friday, Aug. 16, for the fall semester..

4. Register according to instructions in the Time Schedule of Classes.
If you are enrolling for the first time, you need to complete and return an “Application for Admission” form, available from the Admissions Office or Graduate School. There is a $25 matriculation fee for an employee who has not previously enrolled. You may need to file transcripts from schools that you previously attended. Please note that some courses have additional fees that cannot be waived.

Take advantage of your $1,000 Benefit! -- Heidi Kippenhan, Director of Admissions, and Diane Nelson, Director of Personnel.

 

Policy Does Not Permit Smoking Near Entrances, Exits
Not everyone wants to walk through cigarette smoke when entering a building! Per UND policy, smoking is not permitted near main entrances and exits, including ADA accessible entrances and exits, except at a reasonable distance (i.e., 20 feet or more). Remember, we all breathe the same air. – Jason Uhlir, Director, Safety Office.


Payroll Office Provides Information Regarding International Employees
Effective last July 1, international employees (employees who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents) are no longer required to report to the International Centre to obtain a purple card. If departments have any questions regarding employment of international employees or need assistance completing the I-9 form, they should contact the international centre or the payroll office.

Since each international employee has a unique tax status, the payroll office requests that all international employees complete, in addition to their new employee packet, the foreign national information form, located on the payroll web site at www.und.edu/dept/payroll. This form should be completed on the web, printed, signed and returned to the payroll office with a copy of their immigration paperwork (visa, passport, I-20, IAP-66, I-94). The information provided is analyzed using a tax software package to find any tax treaties that would reduce or eliminate the amount of tax UND has to withhold. The payroll office will contact the employee if any additional forms need to be signed. If you have any questions regarding this process, please call Pat or Judy at 777-4226. – Pat Hanson, Director of Payroll.


Studio One Features Senior Citizen Web Site, Award-Winning School
This week on “Studio One,” geezer.com, an alternative way for senior citizens to earn additional income, will be featured. Some seniors are now turning to the Internet to make extra money. Geezer.com allows senior artists to display and sell crafts online.

Also, “Studio One” will feature St. Joseph School in Red Lake Falls, Minn., which has received the Catholic School for Tomorrow Award from Today’s Catholic Teacher magazine. We’ll learn how this private school’s combination of technology and traditional education make it one of the top Catholic schools in the nation.

“Studio One” is an award-winning news and information program produced at the University of North Dakota Television Center. The program airs live at 5 p.m. on UND Channel 3 on Thursdays. Rebroadcasts can be seen at noon, 7 and 11 p.m. daily and on Saturdays at 10 a.m. Prairie Public Television airs “Studio One” on Saturday at 6 a.m. The program can also be seen in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan, Minot, Minneapolis and Winnipeg, Manitoba. – Amy Suydam, Studio One Marketing Team.


Traffic Division Issues Parking Reminders
We would like to remind faculty and staff that overnight parking is not allowed at the UND airport facility. This change was made some time ago because of increased enrollment in the aviation programs and heightened security regulations at the airport.

We have contacted the Grand Forks airport to obtain overnight parking rates; they are $1 per hour with a maximum of $5 per day. Extended long-term parking is $30 per week.
Regarding on-campus parking, we have received several complaints about the area behind the ROTC building and along the railroad tracks on Campus Road. There is an area currently labeled “compact cars only” and we are receiving complaints of larger vehicles parking there, causing a safety hazard. To prevent damage to your car and other vehicles, please be aware of the size of your car and make sure it does not extend into the roadway. We are concerned because accidents have happened, and this summer we will re-stripe that area to make it more clear. There is usually parking available for “A” zone passes in the Gustafson or the Upson lots. Thank you. – Traffic Division.

 

University Bookstore Seeks Temporary Employees
The University Bookstore, Barnes & Noble is hiring temporary employees for spring book buyback, April 30 to May 10. Helpful knowledge and duties include: cash register functions, clerical skills, bookselling, and customer service. Applications are available at the bookstore, or call 777-2746. – University Bookstore.


Upcoming U2 Workshops Listed
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS AND SERVICES
ITSS classes are held in 361 Upson II, and require a working knowledge of Windows or a Windows class. Enrollment is limited to 12 in most cases. Instructor: Doris Bornhoeft.
Creating a Web Page Using HTML: April 16, 8:30 to 11 a.m. and April 18, 8:30 a.m. to noon (six hours total). Learn how to create a Web page with Hyper-Text Markup Language, graphics, and links.

PERSONNEL SERVICES
Everything You Wanted to Know About Supervising, But Were Afraid to Ask: April 17, 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., 211 Rural Technology Center. When do you pay overtime? What if I don’t have the budget for overtime? An employee’s probation is ending but I have problems with his/her performance, what do I do? I have two employees and one says that I treat each of them differently, what do I do? Who is eligible for donated leave? These questions and many more will be answered by a panel on how to deal with employment issues at the University. This forum will be structured using a question/answer format. Presenters: Joy Johnson, Diane Nelson, and Desi Sporbert.

SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
Bloodborne Pathogens, An Ounce of Prevention: April 15, 2 to 4 p.m., 235 Rural Technology Center. Because of the increase in hepatitis and HIV cases in the past decade, it is important that persons who work around potentially infectious materials know how to protect themselves. This workshop will help provide information about bloodborne pathogens, and how risks of exposure can be reduced. Presenter: Sherri Pallen, Safety and Environmental Health.

STUDENT ACADEMIC SERVICES
Working with Students Who Are Not Succeeding Academically: April 16, 2 to 3 p.m., Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union. When students aren’t succeeding academically, what can we do as advisors? What intervention and preventative measures can we take to help these students succeed? Presenter: Angie Carpenter, Student Academic Services.

HOW TO REGISTER
Registering for U2 workshops is easy! Contact Amy Noeldner at the University Within the University office by phone, 777-2128, fax, 777-2140, e-mail, U2@mail.und.nodak.edu, or mail to: Box 7131. To register online, go to www.conted.und.edu/U2. Please provide the following information when you register: your name, department, box number, phone number, Social Security number (for accurate record keeping), and e-mail address; the title and date of the event; and the method of payment (ID billing, personal check, or credit card number and expiration date) if the event has a fee. – Amy Noeldner, University Within the University.


Public Health Department Offers Free Blood Pressure Checks, More
In observance of national public health week, the Grand Forks Public Health Department will offer free blood pressure screening and free smoking cessation packets to citizens. Feel free to stop by Grand Forks Public Health from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Friday in the County Office Building, 151 South Fourth Street, Suite N301. If you have any questions, or need more information, please call 787-8100. – Jane Croeker (Student Health Services), for Bev Benda-Moe and Kathy Mack, City Wellness Program Coordinators, Grand Forks Public Health.

 

GRANTS AND RESEARCH

 

Scholarly Activities Committee Makes Awards
The Senate scholarly activities committee received three requests for research/creativity funds, three requests for publication funds, and 16 applications for new faculty scholar awards in the February call for proposals. The following awards were made at the committee meeting Feb. 26:

Publication awards: Christopher Anderson (music), $1,430 for publication of a monograph titled “Max Reger and Karl Straube: Perspectives on an Organ Performing Tradition”; Ju Kim (physics), $450 for publication of an article in Physical Review B; Timothy Young (physics), $1,200 for publication in an article in The Astrophysical Journal.

Research/creative activity awards: Devon Hansen (geography), $1,360 for a project titled “Bosnian Refugee Resettlement and Adjustment to Life in the Communities of Grand Forks and Fargo”; Jun Ren (pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics), $2,500 for a project titled “Antioxidant Treatment in Diabetic Heart Complications.”

The following new faculty scholar awards of $5,000 each were made. These awards provide support for research and creative activity to assistant professors who have completed less than three years at UND: Christopher Austin (biology), “Green Blood and Malaria Parasite Infection in Lizards: The Role of a Novel Physiology”; Charlene Chamberlain (communication sciences and disorders), “Reading Skills of Adult Deaf Good and Poor Readers: Insights from Eye Movement Research”; Kim Fink (art), “Mixed-Media Printmaking”; Wayne Seames (chemical engineering), “Removing Sulfur Dioxide from Anaerobic Gas Streams in Fiber-based Bioreactors”; Sandra Short (physical education and exercise science), “Confidence in Team Sports”; Kara Wettersten (counseling), “Freedom Through Self-Sufficiency: an Examination of the Effectiveness of Vocational Counseling Interventions for Women Survivors of Domestic Violence.” – Garl Rieke (anatomy and cell biology), Senate Scholarly Activities Committee.

 

January, February Awardees Listed
The office of research and program development would like to congratulate the following UND faculty and staff who were listed as principal or co-principal investigators on awards received during the months of January and February 2002:

Anatomy and cell biology: Edward Carlson; anthropology: Dennis Toom; atmospheric sciences: Michael Poellot; aviation: Paul Lindseth; biology: Jefferson Vaughan; community medicine and rural health: Mary Amundson; EERC: Ted Aulich, Steven Benson, Dean Evenstad, Kevin Galbreath, John Gallagher, Gerald, Groenewold, Douglas Hajieck, Debra Haley, Sheila Hanson, David Hassett, John Hurley, Marc Kurz, Jason Laumb, Donald McCollar, Stanley Miller, Carolyn Nyberg, Erin O’Leary, Edwin Olson, John Pavlish, Wesley Peck, Darren Schmidt, James Sorensen, Barbara Steadman, Michael Swanson, Ronald Timpe, Kirk Williams, Christopher Zygarlicke; geology and geological engineering: William Gosnold; information systems and business education: Sandra Braathen; medical school academic affairs and information resources: Robert Rubeck; medical school administration and finance: Randy Eken; Native American programs: Linda Neuerberg; neuroscience: Sharon Wilsnack; nursing: Lonna Milburn; pediatrics: Larry Burd; pharmacology, physiology and therapeutics: Joseph Benoit; psychology: Jeffery Holm; SBDC: George Youngerman; school of medicine and health sciences: H. David Wilson; social work: Timothy Schroeder; sociology-SSRI: Cordell Fontaine; southwest campus - Bismarck: Nicholas Neumann; space studies: Robert Andres, Shanaka de Silva; student health services: Alan Allery; theatre arts: Kathleen McLennan; vice president for academic affairs: Sara Hanhan; vice president for academic affairs-summer institute of linguistics: Stephen Marlett. -- William Gosnold, Interim Director, Office of Research and Program Development.


Research, Grant Opportunities Listed
Following are research and grant opportunities. For additional information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278 or shirley_griffin@mail.und.nodak.edu.

AGENCY FOR HEALTHCARE RESEARCH AND QUALITY (AHRQ)
Health Services Research--Support to enhance the quality, appropriateness, and effectiveness of health services. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Carolyn Clancy, 301-594-2829; cclancy@ahrq.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-00-111.html.

AGENCY FOR HEALTHCARE RESEARCH AND QUALITY (AHRQ), DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS, HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT SERVICE
Translating Research into Practice (PA-02-066)--Support to conduct research and evaluation projects related to translation of research findings into measurable improvements in quality, patient safety, health care outcomes and cost, use, and access. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Margaret Coopey, 301-594-4022; mcoopey@AHRQ.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-02-066.html.

DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE
Broad Agency Announcement for Research & Development (BAA 914497)--Funding for innovative forensic science research and development projects in six broad areas: explosives and arson, computer forensics, DNA, toolmarks, fingerprints, and trace evidence. Deadline: 4/23/02. Contact: Julie Hammond, 202-324-0569; jhammon1@leo.gov; http://www.fedbizopps.gov/.

NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE (NCI)
Cancer Education and Career Development Program--Support for development and implementation of curriculum-development programs to train predoctoral and postdoctoral candidates in cancer research settings that are highly inter-disciplinary and collaborative. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Lisa Begg, 301-402-4472; beggl@mail.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-00-064.html.

Minorities in Clinical Oncology (K08)--Support for minority health professionals to gain sufficient research expertise to become clinical oncologists with experience in biomedical research. Contact: Eric J. Bailey, 301-496-7344; baileye@mail.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-00-040.html. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03.

NATIONAL CENTER FOR COMPLEMENTARY AND ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (NCCAM)
Chiropractic and Osteopathic Trial Pilot Grants--Support for clinical trials investigating the efficacy and effectiveness of chiropractic and osteopathy for treatment of, and rehabilitation associated with, musculoskeletal injuries and disorders. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02. Contact: Richard L. Nahin, 301-435-5042; rn8p@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-99-013.html.

Traditional Indigenous Systems of Medicine--Support for developmental studies to establish the methodological feasibility for proceeding to full-scale randomized clinical trials on the use of traditional, indigenous systems of medicine. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02. Contact: Marguerite Evans, 301-402-5860; me16o@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-00-041.html.

NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES (NCRR)
Development of Nonmammalian Models & Related Biological Materials for Research. Contact: Jill L. Carrington, 301-435-0744; jc189n@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-99-115.html. Deadlines: 2/1/02, 6/1/02, 10/1/02.

NATIONAL EYE INSTITUTE (NEI)
Clinical Study Planning Grant (R21)--Support for large-scale clinical research projects, including randomized clinical trials and epidemiologic studies. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Mary Frances Cotch, mfcotch@nei.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-00-051.html.

Clinical Vision Research Development Award (R21)--Support to assist institutions in developing expertise of staff and acquiring resources necessary to enhance clinical vision research programs. Deadlines and Contact: See Above.

Collaborative Research on Therapy for Visual Disorders--Support for collaborative multidisciplinary research focused on development of novel therapies to restore or prevent loss of function due to visual diseases and disorders. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Peter A. Dudley, 301-496-0484; pad@nei.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-01-022.html.

Cooperative Program on Retinal Degenerative Disease Research. Contact: Peter A. Dudley, 301-496-0484; pad@nei.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-00-009.html.

Novel Approaches to Corneal Tissue Engineering--Support for investigator-initiated research exploring new approaches that could lead to enhanced engineering of corneal tissues. Contact: Richard S. Fisher, 301-496-5301; rf75s@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-02-053.html. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03.

Small Grants--Support for research that is innovative and/or potentially of high impact to vision research. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Richard S. Fisher, 301-496-5301; rf75s@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-01-007.html.

Small Research Grants for Data Analysis--Support for research projects involving secondary data analyses using existing database resources. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Mary Frances Cotch, 301-496-5983; mfcotch@nei.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-99-170.html.

NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE (NHLBI)
Animal Models of Organ-Specific Tolerance for Heart and Lung Transplantation (PA-02-044)--Support for development of organ-specific tolerance protocols using 1) large animal models for heart transplantation, and 2) both large and small animal models for lung transplantation. Deadline: NIH Standard Dates. Contact: Judith Massicot-Fisher, 301-435-0528, massicoj@nih.gov (Heart Transplantation); Dorothy Gail, 301-435-0222, Gaild@nih.gov; (lung transplantation); http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-02-044.html.

Support to investigate the pathogenesis and new treatments for primary and secondary lymphedema. Contact: Henry Chang, 301-435-0067, changh@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-035.html. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03.

Support for research on the cumulative and contemporaneous relationships between socioeconomic status and physical and mental health and functioning over the life course and across generations. Contact: Sarah S. Knox, 301-435-0404; sk39j@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-98-098.html. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03.

Vascular and Hematopoietic Development and Disease--Support for definition of critical processes that direct differentiation and organization of the vascular system. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Lan-Hsiang Wang, 301-435-0510; lw72f@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-98-035.html.

NATIONAL HUMAN GENOME RESEARCH INSTITUTE (NHGRI)
Centers of Excellence in Genomic Science (PAR-02-021)--Support for the Centers of Excellence. Deadlines: 1/1/03, 5/102, 7/1/02 (Letter of intent); 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03 (Applications). Contact: Jeffery A. Schloss, 301-496-7531; jeff_schloss@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-02-021.html.

Courses in Genomic Analysis and Interpretation and ELSI Related Research--Support for short, advanced-level courses in genomic analysis and interpretation and in ethical, legal and social implications research. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Bettie J. Graham, 301-496-7531; Bettie_Graham@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-99-059.html.

Pilot Projects or Feasibility Studies for Genomic Analysis--Support to develop technologies that will accelerate genome mapping, sequencing and analysis goals of the Human Genome Project. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Elise Feingold, 301-496-7531; ef5j@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-97-045.html.

Support to develop strategies and technologies for obtaining DNA sequence in gaps that will remain in essentially finished genomic sequence. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Jane L. Peterson, 301-496-7531; Jane_Peterson@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAS-00-112.html.

NATIONAL HUMAN GENOME RESEARCH INSTITUTE (NHGRI), NATIONAL CENTER FOR RESEARCH RESOURCES (NCRR), NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH (NIMH)
Increasing the Efficiency of Building Physical Maps from Clone Libraries for Genomic Studies (RFA HG-02-004)--Support for projects to improve capability for rapidly and efficiently producing a contiguous physical map of a genome from libraries of genomic clones and reduce the cost of physical mapping. Deadlines: 4/23/02 (Letter of Intent); 05/23/02 (Application). Contact: Jane Peterson, NHGRI, 301-496-7531, Jane_peterson@nih.gov; John Harding, NCRR, 301- 435-0776, harding@ncrr.nih.gov; Hemin Chin, NIMH, 301-443-9869, hchin@mail.nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-HG-02-004.html.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ALLERGY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES (NIAID)
Support to conduct novel and innovative HIV research. Deadlines: 5/1/02, 9/1/02, 1/2/03. Contact: Patricia DÆSouza, 301-496-8379; pd6n@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-055.html.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF CHILD HEALTH AND HUMAN DEVELOPMENT (NICHD)
Support for basic, applied, and methodological research that can advance knowledge about the influence of social networks on HIV risk and application of that knowledge to HIV prevention and treatment efforts. Deadlines: 5/1/02, 9/1/02, 1/2/03. Contact: Susan Newcomer, 301-435-6981; Snewcomer@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAS-01-068.html.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH (NIMH)
HIV-1 Infection of the Central Nervous System--Support for determining pathogenic mechanisms involved in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-1 associated neurobehavioral and neurological dysfunction. Deadlines: 5/1/02, 9/1/02, 1/2/03. Contact: Jeymohan Joseph, 301-443-3012; jjeymoha@mail.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-072.html.

HIV Treatment and Research Adherence--Support for a broad range of research on HIV treatment adherence. Deadlines: 5/1/02, 9/1/02, 1/2/03. Contact: Christopher M. Gordon, 301-443-1613; dr89b@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-073.html.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING (NIA)
Biology of the Menopausal Process and Associated Health Conditions During and After Menopause--Support for research that elucidates molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the menopausal process, and pathophysiologic connections of that process with various health problems and conditions of peri- and postmenopausal women. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Frank Bellino, 301-496-6402; FB12A@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-067.html.

Gene Therapy in Aging--Support to encourage research on strategies to prevent or delay adverse aging related changes and diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, using genetic and cellular droach@niaaa.nih.gov; Margaret Mattson, 301-443-0638, rlittlen@niaaa.nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-02-039.html.

Role of Tobacco Dependence in Alcoholism Treatment (PA-02-064). Contact: Joanne B. Fertig, 301-443-0635; jfertig@niaaa.nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-02-064.html. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03.

Support for research aimed at increasing knowledge about cost of services for treatment and prevention of alcoholism and alcohol-related problems. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Mike Hilton, 301-443-8753; mh114q@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-98-104.html.

Support for research on alcohol-related problems. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Ernestine Vanderveen, 301-443-2530; tv9f@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-99-098.html.

Support for secondary analysis of existing data sets relevant to developing a knowledge base to improve delivery of services for alcohol-related problems, including treatment and preventive interventions. Contact: Harold I. Perl, 301-443-0788; hperl@willco.niaaa.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-00-100.html. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03.

Support for studies of adoption in clinical practice of scientific advances in treatment of alcohol dependence and abuse. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Mike Hilton, 301-443-8753; mhilton@willco.niaaa.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-058.html.

Treatment of Alcohol Abuse/Dependent Patients with Psychiatric Comorbidity (PA-02-067) (includes Axis I and Axis II disorders as defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition [DSM-IV]). Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Charlene E. LeFauve, 301-402-9401 clefauve@NIAAA.nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-02-067.html.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON ALCOHOL ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (NIAAA) AND NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF DIABETES, DIGESTIVE AND KIDNEY DISEASES (NIDDK)
Alcoholic Hepatitis: Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms (PA-02-078)--Support to study underlying cellular, biochemical, and molecular mechanisms by which chronic ethanol ingestion leads to initiation and development of alcoholic hepatitis. Deadlines: 6/1/02, 10/1/02, 2/1/03. Contact: Vishnudutt Purohit, NIAAA, 301-443-2689, vpurohit@willco.niaaa.nih.gov; Jose Serrano, NIDDK, 301-594-8871, SerranoJ@extra.niddk.nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-02-078.html.

-- William Gosnold, Interim Director, Office of Research and Program Development.

 


 

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