University Letter

Volume 40, Number 13: November 22, 2002

R&D Showcase II Focuses On University, Private Sector Partnerships
U Community Invited To Participate In Winter Commencement
Volunteers Sought For Winter Commencement Dec. 20

EVENTS TO NOTE

Indian Physicians Group To Hold Workshop At UND
Library And Student Government Establish Popular Reading Collection
Hockey Teams To Be Inducted Into UND Hall Of Fame
Forensic Science Club Hosts Talk Nov. 24
Traditional Dance Lessons Available Nov. 24
Agenda Announced For Graduate Committee Meeting
Issues In Online, Distance Learning To Be Discussed In New PBS Series
Music Ensembles To Present Two Concerts
Doctoral Examination Set For Brian Wilson
Reception Will Honor Earl Mason
Holiday Art And Craft Fair Set For Dec. 6

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Directory Addition
FlexComp Open Enrollment Deadline Approaching
Health Sciences Bookstore Moves To Barnes And Noble Bookstore
Recycling, Holiday Cooking Featured On Studio One
Are You Ready For Winter Driving?
Denim Day Is Last Wednesday Of Month
Thanksgiving Holiday Hours Listed

IN REMEMBRANCE

Deaths Announced
Remembering Elmer Morlock
Remembering Barbara Korynta

GRANTS AND RESEARCH

Proposals Sought For Major Research Instrumentation Program
Research, Grant Opportunities Listed

R&D Showcase II Focuses On University, Private Sector Partnerships

North Dakota’s key economic development, political, business and higher education leaders will gather at the Alerus Center Monday, Dec. 9, to explore the capacities and potential of the state’s research universities at “R&D Showcase II: Universities-Private Sector Partnerships as an Engine for Economic Development.”
Coordinated by UND’s Energy & Environmental Research Center, the North Dakota University System showcase is free and open to the public. To register for the showcase and the meals, go to http://www.undeerc.org or call Dee Kraft at 777-5068.

The showcase will focus in part on the Red River Valley Research Corridor concept. Other items on the agenda include the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR), the North Dakota State University research and technology park, the EERC and its foundation as an international model, a panel discussion on “Concept to Commercialization,” a tour of the EERC, and “The Oregon Story: A Successful Research Corridor.”

Keynote speakers include Sen. Bill Nelson, Florida, and Sen. Byron Dorgan, who will speak on “Success with Research Corridors”; Gov. John Hoeven, who will speak about “Growing/Reinventing North Dakota”; and Larry Isaak, North Dakota University System chancellor, who will speak about “The Importance of Research in the University System.”

“The first R&D Showcase (in Bismarck in March 2001) resulted from a Legislative Round Table recommendation to develop a university system which aligns its intellectual capacity and programs with the needs of the state of North Dakota, particularly in cooperation with private enterprise, the Department of Commerce, and regional economic development groups,” said UND President Charles Kupchella, showcase committee chair. Kupchella said the showcase provided an opportunity for North Dakota legislators, university personnel and community leaders to discuss the role of research, development, demonstration, and commercialization in the North Dakota University System as an engine for economic development.

The Dec. 9 showcase will focus on examples of current strategies for enhancing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization activities, and to consider university-private sector partnerships and other strategies for the future as part of the Red River Valley Research Corridor concept, said Kupchella.
“This research corridor concept will promote interaction among community, government, business, industry, and academia whereby quality research and training in higher education institutions is used to develop, attract, and retain knowledge-based, high-technology companies, as well as other companies,” Kupchella said.
The Showcase is sponsored by UND, the North Dakota Department of Commerce, NDSU, the North Dakota University System, North Dakota EPSCoR and the UND Energy & Environmental Research Center.

R&D Showcase II committee members include: Charles Kupchella, UND President, and committee chair; Peter Alfonso, Vice President for Research, UND; Philip Boudjouk, Vice President of Research, Creative Activities and Technology Transfer, NDSU; Joseph Chapman, President, NDSU; Paul Govig, Director of Division of Community Services, North Dakota Department of Commerce, Bismarck; Tony Grindberg, Executive Director, NDSU Research and Technology Park, Inc., Fargo; Gerald Groenewold, Director, UND EERC; Pam Gulleson, Senior Legislative Analyst for Sen. Byron Dorgan and North Dakota State House of Representatives Assistant Minority Leader; Deb Haley, Associate Director, UND EERC; Mike Hillman, Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, North Dakota University System, Bismarck; Mark Sheridan, Project Director, North Dakota EPSCoR.

Here’s the schedule of events:

7:30 to 8:15 a.m.: registration; 8:15 to 8:30 a.m.: welcome and introduction, Charles Kupchella, UND President; 8:30 to 8:45 a.m.: keynote presentation, “Growing/Reinventing North Dakota,” Gov. John Hoeven; 8:45 to 9 a.m.: “The Importance of Research in the University System,” Larry Isaak, Chancellor, North Dakota University System; 9 to 10:15 a.m.: panel, “Vision for a Research Corridor in North Dakota.” Panel hosts: Charles Kupchella, UND President, and Joseph Chapman, NDSU President. Panelists: Pam Gulleson, Senior Legislative Analyst for Sen. Byron Dorgan and North Dakota State House of Representatives Assistant Minority Leader, Rutland, N.D.; Al Joseph, Industry Consultant and Chairman, ISR, Inc., Clarkston, Wash.; Lee Peterson, Commissioner, Department of Commerce, North Dakota Economic Development and Finance; Chuck Stroup, President, North Dakota State Board of Higher Education, Hazen; Roger Reierson, President, Flint Communications, Inc., Fargo. 10:15 to 10:45 a.m.: break; 10:45 to 11 a.m.: Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) - The Effectiveness of the EPSCoR Program - “A Worthy Investment,” Mark Sheridan, Project Director, North Dakota EPSCoR, Fargo; 11 to 11:45 a.m.: panel, “Building University-Industry Partnerships.” Panelists: (invited) Joel Heitkamp, State Senator, Hankinson; Ken Svedjan, State Representative, Grand Forks; Clinton Kopp, President, III Corporation, and Member, EPSCoR Technology Transfer Advisory Board, Bismarck; Steve Zullo, U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington, D.C.; John Hurt, NSF Program for Innovation, Arlington, Va.; 11:45 to 1:15 p.m.: lunch with address: “Success with Research Corridors,” Sen. Byron Dorgan; 1:15 to 1:30 p.m.: Sen. C. William Nelson, Florida; 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.: NDSU Showcase Example: NDSU/Phoenix International, Research Park, Tony Grindberg, Executive Director, NDSU Research and Technology Park, Inc.; 2:30 to 3 p.m.: “EERC/EERC Foundation: An International Model,” Gerald Groenewold, Director, UND EERC; 3 to 3:30 p.m., break; 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., panel: “Concept to Commercialization.” Panel moderator: Gerald Groenewold, Director, EERC. Panelists: Mark Krauseneck, President and CEO, Grand Forks Region Economic Development Corporation; Bernard Hamel, Chief Technology Officer, Marsulex Environmental Technologies Inc., LLC, Philadelphia, Pa.; John MacFarlane, Chairman of the Board, Otter Tail Power Company, Fergus Falls, Minn.; and a Deputy Director, U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, Pa.; 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.: tour of the EERC; 6 p.m.: social/dinner address, “The Oregon Story: A Successful Research Corridor.”

 

U Community Invited To Participate In Winter Commencement

Faculty members and administrative staff are encouraged to march in academic regalia in the winter commencement ceremony Friday, Dec. 20, at 2 p.m. in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. Faculty should assemble in the rehearsal room in the lower level of the auditorium by 1:30 p.m. University marshals will be on hand to direct participants to their places in the procession. Faculty members will be seated on the stage for the ceremony.

Please contact Tammy Anderson in the Office of the Vice President for Student and Outreach Services at 777-2724 by Wednesday, Dec. 18, or send an e-mail message to tammy_anderson@mail.und.nodak.edu if you plan to participate so the appropriate number of seats can be reserved.

I encourage participation by faculty members to help make this a memorable occasion for our graduates, their families, and friends. -- Charles Kupchella, President.

 

Volunteers Sought For Winter Commencement Dec. 20

Your help is requested for winter commencement Friday, Dec. 20, at the Chester Fritz Auditorium. “Green Jacket” volunteers assist by seating guests, helping organize our graduates, and greeting campus visitors who attend the ceremony.

Commencement begins at 2 p.m. and all volunteers are asked to report to the lower level of the Chester Fritz Auditorium by 12:30 p.m. for a short briefing and to receive their assignments. We anticipate that commencement will conclude by approximately 3:30 p.m.

Please contact Tammy Anderson in the Office of the Vice President for Student and Outreach Services at 777-2724 or e-mail her at tammy_anderson@mail.und.nodak.edu by Friday, Dec. 13, to let us know if you will be able to participate. Please feel free to call if you have any questions. – Fred Wittmann, Office of the Vice President, Student and Outreach Services.

 

EVENTS TO NOTE

Indian Physicians Group To Hold Workshop At UND

The Association of American Indian Physicians (AAIP) will hold a workshop at UND this week aimed at encouraging Native American students to pursue advanced education in the health care professions.

The pre-admission workshop, which runs from Thursday to Sunday, Nov. 21-24, is hosted in coordination with the Indians Into Medicine (INMED) program at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

The goal of the workshop is to prepare students to apply to medical and other health professions schools. Sessions will focus on the application process, writing a personal statement, scholarship and research opportunities, financial aid, and the INMED prep program and academic support services.

About 25 Native American college students, pre-medicine majors from throughout the country, as well as AAIP staff and Native American physicians are expected to attend. Students apply for and are selected to participate in the workshop. UND undergraduate and medical students who are enrolled through the INMED program will also participate in the workshop.

A panel of academic and research leaders will discuss research at UND which involves and impacts American Indians, and another panel of INMED alumni and other Native American physicians will discuss their experiences in becoming health professionals.

The AAIP sponsors workshops on this type three or four times annually at colleges and universities across the United States, said Jim Beiswenger, program specialist with the INMED program. This is the first time one has been held at UND.

The event is funded through the AAIP Health Careers Opportunity Program with support from the INMED program. – School of Medicine and Health Sciences.

 

Library And Student Government Establish Popular Reading Collection

The Chester Fritz Library with the support of the Student Government has established a new popular reading collection offering the best in modern fiction and biography. The collection is funded through a special allocation from the 2001/02 Student Government. The idea for the collection was developed by Student Senator Nick Wangler, who authored a bill in the Student Senate to allocate funding for the acquisition of novels for recreational reading. The public is invited to attend the opening of the popular reading collection at a ceremony in the Chester Fritz Library reading room at 11 a.m. Friday, Nov. 22.

The purpose of the collection is to provide literature not associated with a particular academic program, but of interest to recreational reading interests. The library has targeted the best in modern fiction including award winners from many genres including mystery, western, science fiction, romance, and biography. Library bibliographers are reviewing many notable book and best seller lists, current press releases and special interest information when selecting books for the collection, and will order books throughout the year. The collection is expected to grow to over 600 books by the spring semester. “We appreciate the Student Government’s interest in supporting this collection of books,” said Wilbur Stolt, director of libraries. “It is a wonderful supplement to the library’s research collections.” Additional novels and biographies given as gifts to the library will also be added to the collection in the future.

Information about individual books in the collection is available through the library’s online catalog. The books are located on new shelving recently installed in the Reading Room. They may be previewed in the Reading Room and checked out for personal use. – Wilbur Stolt, Director of Libraries.

 

Hockey Teams To Be Inducted Into UND Hall Of Fame

UND’s first Division I hockey team, 1947-1948, and the school’s first national championship team, 1958-1958, will be inducted into the UND Athletic Hall of Fame during the hockey alumni weekend, Nov. 22 and 23. They are the first hockey teams to be inducted into the Hall of Fame. Also inducted will be Jim Archibald, who played hockey from 1982 to 1985. Archibald, of Craven, Saskatchewan, earned a bachelor’s degree from UND in 1988.

Activities surrounding the hockey weekend include the UND vs. Wisconsin hockey series at the Ralph Engelstad Arena Friday and Saturday, Nov. 22 and 23. All hockey letterwinners will be introduced on the ice at Friday night’s game and Hall of Fame inductees will be introduced on the ice at Saturday night’s game.

On Saturday, Nov. 23, a Hall of Fame induction luncheon will be held at noon at the Holiday Inn. Tickets for the luncheon are $12. For more information regarding the weekend, contact the UND Alumni Association at 777-2611 or www.undalumni.org.

– UND Alumni Association and Foundation.

 

Forensic Science Club Hosts Talk Nov. 24

The Forensic Science Club is sponsoring a talk by John A. Williams (anthropology), Sunday, Nov. 24, at 2 p.m. in the Lecture Bowl, Memorial Union. Dr. Williams will present “I See Dead People or My Day Begins When Yours Ends.”

Williams, a board-certified forensic anthropologist and a Fellow of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences, is currently chair of the anthropology department and director of the forensic science program. He will talk about his role as a forensic anthropologist and how forensic anthropology serves society from the local area to the nation and the world. – Jan Orvik, Editor, for Melanie Summers-Jones, President, Forensic Science Club.

 

Traditional Dance Lessons Available Nov. 24

North Country Fiddle & Dance will teach Midwestern squares, Appalachian circle dances, New England contras, Canadian reels, and more Sunday, Nov. 24, 1:30 to 4 p.m. at the International Centre, 2908 University Ave. The North Country String Band will play live music. Donations will be taken at the door. – Jeanie O’Neil, North Country Fiddle and Dance, 773-3850.

 

Agenda Announced For Graduate Committee Meeting

The Graduate Committee will meet Monday, Nov. 25, from 3:05 to 5 p.m. in 305 Twamley Hall. The agenda will include:

1. Approval of minutes from Nov. 4.

2. Three requests from the School of Engineering and Mines:

a. Request for a new course, Chemical Engineering 535, Materials and Corrosion. Dean Watson will discuss this request at 3:05 p.m.
b. Deletion of ME 541, Advanced Thermodynamics.
c. New program description for combined programs in chemical, civil, electrical, and mechanical engineering.

3. The Graduate School requests that the committee reconsider the College of Nursing’s request to offer a new general nursing admission option. The committee had asked us to handle this administratively but it appears that the solution the College of Nursing has come up with will be the easiest and won’t overturn the non-degree rule of requiring students to take no more than nine non-degree credits before enrolling in a program.

4. Request from geography for a change in program request to the M.A./M.S. in geography. They propose that all students take the same new seminar, Geography 541, Seminar in Geography, instead of choosing one of two graduate seminar courses. This is clarification from previous paperwork.

5. Request from graduate dean to change GPA admission requirements for specialist or doctoral programs from 3.5 to 3.0. (See Page 173, No. 3 in the Academic Catalog under requirements for admission to specialist or doctoral program.)

6. Update on graduate committee elections.

7. Matters arising.

Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School.

 

Issues In Online, Distance Learning To Be Discussed In New PBS Series

Meeting ADA accessibility requirements . . . correctly applying fair use copyright standards . . . policing Internet-enabled plagiarism . . . each of these issues poses a challenge – if not an all-out problem – for faculty, staff and distance educators everywhere. Yet difficult as these challenges may be, the process of addressing them can benefit your students, your courses, and your college in surprising ways. To find out how, the Division of Continuing Education, the Center for Instructional Learning Technologies and UND’s Information Technology System and Services invite you to attend the latest PBS adult learning series on “Critical Issues in Online and Distance Learning.” This new series is designed for faculty, staff and distance educators of the digital age. The first PBS presentation and discussion will be Monday, Nov. 25, from 3 to 4:30 p.m. in the River Valley Room, Memorial Union.

The first critical challenge that this series will address is ADA laws and how they affect the design and delivery of online and distance courses. Although the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 preceded the vast expansion of Internet-based learning, ADA requirements and related federal statutes definitely do apply to online and distance learning, regardless of the technology used. And as of last year, federal laws regarding accessibility for students using electronic and information technology now have more teeth. As the Chronicle of Higher Education put it, institutions realize they need to include “the virtual equivalents of wheelchair ramps when building their online classrooms.” Implementing technology-based courses that are accessible to the greatest number of people is, of course, the right thing to do. In addition, courses that are designed with accessibility in mind generally work better for all students and learning styles.

During this interactive forum, PBS experts and a panel of UND faculty and staff will examine three elements that are vital to ensuring that online and distance-learning courses serve disabled students effectively:

• What the ADA law does, and does not, require;
• Good course design and low- or no-cost solutions that increase access and decrease the need for adaptive technologies in new courseware;
• Retro-fitting existing course materials.

The discussion and panelists from UND will offer practical tips and up-to-the-minute information that will assist faculty and staff that must address these issues when involved with online or distance education.

Please attend this session in the three-part series and contribute to the discussion of critical issues that impact all areas of UND. The first session will be held Monday, Nov. 25, from 3 to 4:30 p.m. at the River Valley Room, Memorial Union. The next two discussions will address copyright issues, as well as cheating and plagiarism on the Internet. Critical Challenges in Online and Distance Education will help you identify both the perils and the possibilities inherent in online and distance learning. For more information, please contact CK Braun at 777-6403 or Deb Glennen at 777-3425. – CK Braun, Continuing Education.

 

Music Ensembles To Present Two Concerts

The music department will present two concerts featuring a variety of ensembles and styles of music. Monday, Nov. 25, the Wind Ensemble and the “Pride of the North” marching band will present a showcase concert at 7:30 p.m. in the Chester Fritz Auditorium. The University Band, Allegro women’s chorus, Varsity Bards men’s chorus, and Faculty Brass Quintet will present a holiday “Pops” concert Tuesday, Nov. 26, at the Chester Fritz Auditorium. Tickets for both concerts will be available at the door, and are $5 for general admission and $3 for students.

The Monday evening concert will open with the “Pride of the North” marching band under the direction of Robert Brooks, presenting a showcase concert of their fall season. Included will be performances of the traditional school songs and cheers, music from their western theme show, and selections from the rock opera “Jesus Christ Superstar.” Sixth grade chorus members from Valley Middle School in Grand Forks will join the “Pride of the North” on two of their selections. The Wind Ensemble, conducted by James Popejoy, will open their portion of the program with the exciting “Firework” by European composer Jan Van der Roost, followed by an interesting new tone poem from Thomas Duffy titled “Butterflies and Bees!” Robert Brooks will guest conduct the Wind Ensemble in Alfred Reed’s classic “Hounds of Spring” overture, and the program will conclude with Percy Grainger’s unique piece “The Immovable Do” and an exciting new work by Kenneth Hesketh titled “Masque.” Both ensembles will combine to perform Karl L. King’s “The University of North Dakota” march, and “America, the Beautiful.”

On Tuesday evening the University Band, conducted by James Popejoy, will combine with the Allegro women’s chorus under the direction of Nolan Long; the Varsity Bards men’s chorus, directed by Rebecca Raber; and the UND Faculty Brass Quintet, to present a holiday “Pops” concert. Such holiday favorites as “White Christmas,” “The Most Wonderful Time of the Year,” “Carol of the Bells,” “Go Tell It On the Mountain,” “Winter Wonderland,” and “Sleigh Ride,” will be included on the program along with a rousing finale performance combining all of the ensembles in Clare Grundman’s “Three Noels,” and an audience holiday carol sing-a-long.

For additional information, contact the band department at 777-2815.

 

Doctoral Examination Set For Brian Wilson

The final examination for Brian Wilson, a candidate for the Ph.D. degree with a major in clinical psychology, is set for 2 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 27, in Room 205, Nursing Building. The dissertation title is “The Sexual Behavior Sequelae of Childhood Sexual Abuse in College Women.” Jeffrey Holm (psychology) is the committee chair.

Members of the graduate faculty are invited to attend. – Joseph Benoit, Dean, Graduate School.

 

Reception Will Honor Earl Mason

Earl Mason, professor of civil engineering, will retire Dec. 31, after 34 years of service. The University community is invited to an open house reception for him Wednesday, Dec. 4, from 2 to 4 p.m. at the J. Lloyd Stone Alumni Center. Please join us in wishing Earl the very best in his retirement. – Mary Jo Sturman, Civil Engineering.

 

Holiday Art And Craft Fair Set For Dec. 6

Everyone’s invited to attend the 24th Annual Holiday Art and Craft Fair Friday, Dec. 6, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. in the Memorial Union Ballroom. This traditional event will include artists and crafters ranging from UND students to community members from across the region. Items will include pottery, watercolor paintings, artwork, wooden items, holiday decorations, jewelry, wreaths and floral arrangements, photography, quilts, ceramics, and more.

You can register for door prizes. All are welcome and admission is free. For further information, contact the University Craft Center at 777-3979. – Bonnie Solberg, Craft Center Coordinator.

 

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Directory Addition

Please add the following telephone numbers to the UND directory:
Peggy Lucke, associate vice president, finance and operations, main office number, 777-3585; personal extension number, 777-2182; and fax, 777-3086.

 

FlexComp Open Enrollment Deadline Approaching

The open enrollment period for the FlexComp program for the plan year of Jan. 1, 2003, through Dec. 31, 2003, is quickly coming to an end (open enrollment period is Nov. 1-30, 2002). Enrollment agreements should be in the payroll office by Nov. 30, 2002, to allow for adequate processing time. No enrollment agreements will be accepted after Nov. 30, 2002.

All benefitted employees have the opportunity to enroll or re-enroll in this fringe benefit opportunity. This program helps employees pay for medical and dependent care expenses with pre-tax dollars instead of after-tax dollars.

If you have any questions or need any additional information, call me. – Heidi Strande, Payroll Office FlexComp Specialist, 777-4423.

 

Health Sciences Bookstore Moves To Barnes And Noble Bookstore

The Health Sciences bookstore in the basement of the School of Medicine and Health Sciences will be closed and relocated to the main Barnes and Noble Bookstore at 775 Hamline Street. The entire assortment and services will be moved between Dec. 20 and Dec. 31. Along with the current assortment, customers will be offered an expanded selection of general and medical reference trade titles, as well as extended hours for service and convenience. The main store hours of operation are Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., with extended hours during the book rush season.

For product information and assistance please contact us at 777-2746. – School of Medicine and Health Sciences and Barnes and Noble Bookstore.

 

Recycling, Holiday Cooking Featured On Studio One

The rising cost of recycling will be featured on the next edition of Studio One. As the cost of recycling increases, some cities seek to save money by reducing their recycling efforts. We’ll find out how communities are dealing with this environmental issue.

Also on the next edition of Studio One, chef Kim Holmes will join Studio One to kick off the holiday season. He will demonstrate how to prepare a distinctive Thanksgiving dinner.

Studio One is an award-winning news and information program produced at the University of North Dakota Television Center. The program airs live Thursdays at 5 p.m. on UND Channel 3. Rebroadcasts can be seen at noon, 7, and 11 p.m. daily and on Saturdays at 10 a.m. Prairie Public Television airs Studio One on Saturday at 6 a.m. The program can also be seen in Fargo, Bismarck/Mandan, Minot, Minneapolis, the Portland, Ore., metro area, and Winnipeg, Manitoba.

– UND Studio One Marketing Team.

 

Are You Ready For Winter Driving?

With the arrival of winter to the area, the hazards of winter driving must be taken seriously. There are many simple things that you can do to keep yourself safe and alive.

-- Safety and Environmental Health.

 

Denim Day Is Last Wednesday Of Month

Denim Day is coming! Nov. 27 is the last Wednesday of the month and that means you can wear your Denim Day button, pay your dollar, and enjoy wearing your casual duds in the middle of the week. All proceeds go to charity, as always. Tired of watching other offices and buildings have all the fun? Call me and I’ll set you up with buttons and posters for your area. – Patsy Nies, Enrollment Services, 777-3791, for the Denim Day Committee.

 

Thanksgiving Holiday Hours Listed:

Thanksgiving Day Is Holiday

In accordance with State Board of Higher Education directives, Thursday, Nov. 28, will be observed as Thanksgiving Day by faculty and staff members of the University. Only those employees designated by their department heads will be required to work on this holiday. – John Ettling, Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost, and Diane Nelson, Director, Human Services.

Chester Fritz Library:

Hours of operation for the Thanksgiving weekend at the Chester Fritz Library are: Wednesday, Nov. 27, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 28 (Thanksgiving Day), closed; Friday, Nov. 29, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 30, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Dec. 1, 1 p.m. to midnight. – Karen Cloud, Chester Fritz Library.

Law Library:

Thanksgiving hours for the Thormodsgard Law Library are: Wednesday, Nov. 27, 7:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 28 (Thanksgiving Day), closed; Friday, Nov. 29, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 30, noon to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Dec. 1, noon to 11 p.m. – Cherie Stoltman, Law Library.

Health Sciences Library:

Library of the Health Sciences hours for Thanksgiving weekend are: Wednesday, Nov. 27, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 28 (Thanksgiving Day), closed; Friday, Nov. 29, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 30, 1 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, Dec. 1, 1 p.m. to midnight. – April Byars, Library of the Health Sciences.

Women’s Center:

The Women’s Center will be closed Friday, Nov. 29. If you need assistance, please call the Dean of Students office at 777-2664. – Patty McIntyre, Women’s Center.

Wellness Center Correction:

The Wellness Center hours of operation for Thanksgiving weekend are: Wednesday, Nov. 27, 5:30 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 28 (Thanksgiving Day), closed; Friday, Nov. 29, 5:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 30, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Sunday, Dec. 1, 4 to 10 p.m. – Nikki Seabloom, Wellness Department.

ITSS:

Information Technology Systems and Services will close for the Thanksgiving holiday at 1 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 28, and will reopen at 5 a.m. Friday, Nov. 29. – Marv Hanson, Associate Director, ITSS.

Memorial Union:

The Memorial Union and all its facilities will be closed Thursday, Nov. 28 (Thanksgiving Day), and Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 30 and Dec. 1. Hours for Wednesday, Nov. 27, and Friday, Nov. 29, follow.
Lifetime Sports Center: Wednesday, Nov. 27, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.;
Info/Service Center: Wednesday, Nov. 27, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.;
Copy Stop: Wednesday, Nov. 27, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, closed.
U Turn C-Store: Wednesday, Nov. 29, 7 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, closed.
Subway/TCBY/Juiceworks: Wednesday, Nov. 29, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, closed.
Little Caesars: Wednesday, Nov. 29, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, closed.
Administrative offices: Wednesday, Nov. 29, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Craft Center/Sign and Design: Wednesday, Nov. 29, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, closed.
Student Academic Services: Wednesday, Nov. 29, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Credit Union: Wednesday, Nov. 29, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Dining Center: Wednesday, Nov. 29, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, closed.
Traffic Division: Wednesday, Nov. 29, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Passport I.D.s: Wednesday, Nov. 29, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, closed.
Barber shop: Wednesday, Nov. 29, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, closed.
University Learning Center: Wednesday, Nov. 29, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Computer labs: Wednesday, Nov. 29, 7:30 a.m. to 5:45 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, 8 a.m. to 5:15 p.m.
Building hours: Wednesday, Nov. 29, 7 a.m. to 6:15 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 29, 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Regular operating hours resume Monday, Dec. 2. – Marsha Nelson, Facilities Coordinator, Memorial Union.

IN REMEMBRANCE

Deaths Announced

We are saddened to report that Ron Marquardt, desktop client services consultant with ITSS, died Nov. 17 in the Pembina County Memorial Hospital, Cavalier. He was 44.

We also regret to report that Robert “Bob” Taylor, retired custodian, died Nov. 13 in Altru Hospital. He was 64. -- Jan Orvik, Editor, University Letter.

Remembering Elmer Morlock

Elmer Morlock, retired support services consultant with Information Technology Systems and Service, died at home Nov. 6. He was 65.

Elmer Morlock was born March 4, 1937, to Martin and Emma (Bossart) Morlock in Carrington. He graduated from the School for the Blind in Bathgate, N.D., and from UND in 1961 with a bachelor’s degree in education and a minor in social work. He was working for the Society of the Blind in Minneapolis when an opportunity arose to attend Computer Systems Institute in 1965. After his training, he took an internship in Minneapolis, helping modify a computer program to print Braille.

He joined the University in 1968 as a computer programmer with ITSS. He worked on mainframe computers, wrote programs for payroll use and student registration, developed computer standards, and supported the now defunct visually impaired computer technology group in obtaining computer speech programs and adaptive equipment. He also worked as a consultant with ITSS, offering support services and statistical analysis to faculty and staff.

He enjoyed railroads and history. He was active in the American Council of the Blind of North Dakota, Grand Forks Big Brother Program and the Lions Club.
“Respect! I don’t know anyone who deserved more,” said Tracy Uhlir, ITSS. “His colorful suspenders, positive attitude and sense of humor were just a few of many things I looked forward to every day. With his heart of gold and unending kindness, I’m proud to have had the honor of calling Elmer my friend.”

“When I think of Elmer, I think of his sweet disposition,” said Doris Bornhoeft, ITSS. “He was always cheerful and had a friendly word for everyone, friend and stranger alike. His smile and the many laughs we shared will be lasting memories.”

“Elmer possessed great dignity and self-reliance tempered with a graciousness to accept a willing helping hand,” said Rose Keeley, ITSS. “Elmer knew the real value of life: family, friends and forgiving. He amazed me. I will miss his cheerful voice and presence but treasure the privilege and memories of knowing him.”

“I interacted with him a number of times at the Computer Center, and was impressed with his way of doing things,” said Sukhvarsh Jerath, professor of civil engineering. “His life should encourage all of us to do more to make life better for everybody on this planet.”

He is survived by a sister, Lorraine Kollman, Kensal, N.D.; twin brother, Albert Morlock, Minneapolis; brother, Herb (Bethel) Morlock, Aloha, Ore.; and 10 nieces and nephews. – Jan Orvik, Editor, with information from the Grand Forks Herald, Janie Solarski, Doris Bornhoeft, Rose Keeley, and Tracy Uhlir.

Remembering Barbara Korynta

Barbara C. Korynta, account technician with the traffic division, passed away in her home Nov. 12, 2002. She was 51.

Barbara Catherine Adam was born July 2, 1951, in Grand Forks, to Clemens and Catherine (Weber) Adam. She grew up in Reynolds, N.D., and graduated from Central Valley High School in 1969. She graduated from Aakers Business College, Grand Forks, in 1971. She married Daniel J. Korynta Sept. 11, 1971, in Reynolds. She worked at Northern States Power until 1975, when she began raising her family. She operated a day care center for nearly 20 years. She joined the traffic division Aug. 28, 2000.

She enjoyed camping, boating, vacationing, playing cards and spending time with family and friends.

“Barb will be sadly missed by her friends and co-workers,” said Sherry Kapella, administrative assistant with the traffic division. “Her dedication, sincerity, and compassion for people made her a great asset to our department. She worked very well with students, faculty, and staff. Her people skills were such that she could take a stressful conversation with a customer and turn it into a positive conversation, often ending in a laugh or smile whenever she could. Barb’s children Traci and Aaron graduated from UND. Her daughter Terri graduatedfrom Mayville State and her son Nick is currently enrolled at UND. Barb and her husband Dan attended many UND events and were especially fond of attending UND basketball and football games. We will forever be touched by her strong faith and strength in dealing with whatever difficulties life handed her.”

She is survived by her husband, Daniel; sons, Aaron, Alexandria, Minn., Nicholas, Grand Forks; daughters, Traci (Jared) Kovar, East Grand Forks, Terri (Kent) Monilaws, Absaraka, N.D.; her mother, Catherine Adam, Reynolds; brothers, Ronnie (Charlotte) Adam and Neil (Loretta) Adam, both of Reynolds; sisters, Mary Ann Rakoczy, Reynolds, Julie Anderson, Grand Forks; and a brother-in-law, David VonRuden.

She was preceded in death by her father, Clemens Adam; and a sister, Lorraine VonRuden. – Jan Orvik, Editor, with information from the Grand Forks Herald and Sherry Kapella.

GRANTS AND RESEARCH

Proposals Sought For Major Research Instrumentation Program

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has issued a solicitation for proposals to its Major Research Instrumentation Program (MRI). The MRI program assists in the acquisition or development of major research instrumentation that is, in general, too costly for support through other NSF programs. Proposals may be for a single instrument, a large system of instruments, or multiple instruments that share a common or specific research focus. Computer systems, clusters of advanced workstations, networks, and other information infrastructure components necessary for research are encouraged. Awards for instrumentation will range from $100,000 to $2 million. Lesser amounts will be considered in proposals from the mathematical sciences or from the social, behavioral and economic science community. Approximately $75 million is available for fiscal year 2003.

An institution may submit up to three proposals to the MRI program. Up to two proposals may be for instrument acquisition. If an institution submits three proposals, at least one of the three proposals must be for instrument development. However, two or all three proposals may be for instrument development. An institution may also be included as a member of a legally established consortium submitting a separate proposal, clearly labeled as such in the proposal’s title.

As a result of the limited number of proposals that can be submitted, UND will conduct an internal review of preproposals. Preproposals should consist of the following sections:
• Cover page listing the project name, collaborators, contact person, total budget amount
• Instrument(s) to be purchased or developed and its(their) function(s)
• Impact on the research program of the collaborators, department(s), and college(s)
• Impact on the university’s mission as a whole
• Detailed budget (including expected cost share amounts and sources)

Preproposals should be no more than five pages in length using a reasonable format (1 inch margins, font size 11, single-spaced).

Preproposals are due in the office of research and program development by 4:30 p.m. Friday, Dec. 13. Criteria used for reviewing preproposals will include appropriateness to the goal of the program; probability for funding by NSF; reasonableness of budgetary requests; and impact of the request on the university and the academic units involved. Investigators will be notified of the review results as soon as possible in order to provide as much time as possible to prepare a final proposal for submission.

See the announcement at http://www.nsf.gov/pubs/2002/nsf01171/nsf01171.html for more information on the NSF MRI Program, or contact ORPD (777-4278 or shirley_griffin@mail.und.nodak.edu) to request a copy.

Research, Grant Opportunities Listed
Following are research and grant opportunities. For additional information, contact the Office of Research and Program Development at 777-4278 or shirley_griffin@mail.und.nodak.edu.

HARTFORD (JOHN A.) FOUNDATION, INC.

Support for programs that focus on providing effective and affordable quality care to the older population; two main funding areas are academic geriatrics and training, and integrating and improving services for elders. Deadline: Initial inquires should be made at least six months before funding is needed. Contact: Program Director, 212-832-7788; mail@jhartfound.org; http://www.jhartfound.org/grantseekers.htm.

INTERNATIONAL UNION AGAINST CANCER

UICC—International Cancer Technology Transfer Fellowships (ICRETT)–Support to facilitate rapid international transfer of cancer research and clinical technology; exchange knowledge and enhance skills and acquire up-to-date clinical management, diagnostic and therapeutic expertise. Contact: Union Internationale Centre le Cancer, Telephone 4122 809 18 40; fellows@uicc.org; http://fellows.uicc.org/fell4icr.shtml. Deadline: None.

JOHNSON (ROBERT WOOD) FOUNDATION

Better Jobs, Better Care (Demostration Program)–Support for demonstrations aiming to change public policy as well as provider practice at the state or substate level to reduce vacancies and turnover among paraprofessionals, improve quality of paraprofessional jobs, and strengthen the ability of the workforce to meet future demand for
long-term care. Deadlines: 12/10/02 (Letter of Intent); 2/14/03 (Application). Contact: Debra J. Lipson, dlipson@aahsa.org;
http://www.rwjf.org/applyForGrant/openAbstract.jsp?cfpCode=BJC.

Funding for projects designed to improve the health and health care of Americans. Focus areas include: access to basic health care, improving the way services are organized and provided to people with chronic health conditions, promotion of healthy communities and lifestyles, and promotion of health and reduction of personal, social and economic harm caused by abuse of tobacco, alcohol and illegal drugs. Contact: Edward H. Robbins, 888-631-9989; EROBBINS@rwjf.org; http://www.rwjf.org/app/rw_applying_for_a_grant/rw_app_howto.html. Deadline: None; Letter of Inquiry required.



LLOYD (JOHN M.) FOUNDATION

Support for projects involving prevention, care, and public awareness of AIDS, including public policy, education/awareness, prevention and medical research. Contact: Melanie Havelin, 310-622-1050; info@johnmlloyd.org; http://www.johnmlloyd.org/jml_applicationProcedure.html. Deadlines: 12/15/02, 7/15/03 (Concept Letter); 2/15/03, 9/3/03 (Application).

NATIONAL CANCER CENTER

Pre- and Postdoctoral Fellowships support training and experience in molecular genetics and the cellular aspects of cancer biology and tumor immunology. Deadline: 12/15/02. Contact: 516-349-0610; 88 Sunnyside Boulevard, Plainview, NY 11803.

NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY (NETL) /DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE)

Unsolicited Proposals–Topics include all areas of energy and energy-related research and development with an emphasis on long-term, high-risk, high-payoff technologies. Deadline: None. Contact: John Augustine, 412-892-4524; john.augustine@netl.doe.gov; http://www.netl.doe.gov/business/unsol.html.

NATIONAL HUMAN GENOME RESEARCH INSTITUTE (NHGRI)

Visiting Investigator Program–Funding for tenured or tenure-track researchers to spend 6-12 months at the Institute’s Division of Intramural Research laboratories. All basic, clinical and social scientists are eligible.
Contact: Galen Perry, 301-402-3035; gpp@nhgri.nih.gov; http://www.nhgri.nih.gov/DIR/VIP/vip.html. Deadline: None.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH (NIMH)

Support for work on design, measurement, and statistical challenges inherent in conducting mental health services research. Deadlines: 2/1/03, 6/1/03, 10/1/03. Contact: Ann A. Hohmann, 301-443-4235; ahohmann@nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PA-01-018.html.

NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON AGING (NIA)

Comparative Biology: Mechanisms of Aging–Support for projects using comparative biology approaches to understand biological mechanisms that lead to changes in human and other animal cells and tissues with age. Deadlines: 12/23/02 (Letter of Intent); 1/23/03 (Application). Contact: Jill L. Carrington, 301-496-6402; carringtonj@nia.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AG-03-003.html.

Edward R. Roybal Centers for Translational Research in the Behavioral and Social Sciences–Support to provide research infrastructure to: enhance productivity of relevant research, including promotion of translational research into existing projects; stimulate ideas for new program development in the area of translational research in the social and behavioral sciences; facilitate acceleration in development of new products or technologies to enhance health and quality of life of older Americans; facilitate and accelerate application through studies and analyses of translational process itself; recruit new researchers to translational research; facilitate interaction and collaboration among academic researchers and commercial interests or governmental bodies; and develop innovative networks of researchers with interests in translational research. Contact: Sidney S. Stahl, 301-402-4156; StahlS@nia.nih.gov; http://grants1.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AG-03-002.html. Deadlines: 12/27/02 (Letter of Intent); 1/21/03 (Application).

NATIONAL INSTITUTE ON ALCOHOL ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (NIAAA)

Funding for research on Medications Development to Treat Alcoholism and Other Alcohol-Related Diseases. Deadlines: 12/23/02 (Letter of Intent); 1/23/03 (Application). Contact: Joanne B. Fertig, 301-443-0635; jfertig@niaaa.nih.gov; http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/rfa-files/RFA-AA-03-005.html.

SBIR/STTR Initiative for Software Development for Longitudinal Analysis of Complex Survey Data. Deadlines: 12/24/02 (Letter of Intent); 1/24/03 (Applications). Contact: Bridget Grant, 301-443-7370; bgrant@willco.niaaa.nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/2002/02.10.25/index.html.

NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH)

Support to develop Novel Genetic Methods to Map Functional Neuronal Circuits and Synaptic Change in the mammalian nervous system. Contact: Jonathan Pollock, 301-443-6300; jpollock@mail.nih.gov; http://grants2.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-03-007.html. Deadline: 2/12/03.

NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION (NOAA)

Ocean Exploration Initiative (OE)–Support for research to expand knowledge of the ocean’s physical, chemical and biological characteristics, processes, and resources and learn more about maritime cultural heritage by means of experiments and expeditions to unknown, or poorly known, oceanic and Great Lakes regions. Main interest areas are: mapping ocean characteristics and bathymetry; marine life inventories—vertebrate, invertebrate, macro-organisms and micro-organisms; marine archaeology characterization of benthic and pelagic habitats and ecosystems; locating and mapping corals (including deep corals); new ocean resources; passive ocean acoustics; and technology—innovative applications and leveraged development. Deadlines: 12/16/02 (Preproposal); 1/29/03 (Application). Contact: Margot Bohan, 301-713-9444; oar.oe.FAQ@noaa.gov; http://www.explore.noaa.gov; http://a257.g.akamaitech.net/7/257/2422/14mar20010800/edocket.access.gpo.gov/2002/02-29120.htm.

NILES (LAURA J.) FOUNDATION

Support for efforts to improve the lives of people and animals; to nurture and assist people and families in leading responsible and productive lives by enabling them to help themselves; and to benefit animals, primarily dogs, through research, training, and adoption, especially where people and animals benefit simultaneously. Deadline: None. Contact: 203-629-8552; info@fsllc.net; http://www.laurajnilesfoundation.org/.

OAK RIDGE INSTITUTE FOR SCIENCE AND EDUCATION (ORISE)

For a complete listing of research opportunities available for faculty and students visit the ORISE website at http://www.orau.gov/orise/Educ.htm or http://www.orau.gov/orise/programs.htm. Following are descriptions of some of the opportunities.

Advanced Short-Term Research Opportunities--Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)–Research in areas that support ORNL missions in the basic and applied sciences, energy, and the environment. Deadline: None. Contact: Bonnie DeJarnette, 865-241-4832; dejarneb@orau.gov; http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/ornl/gi-rgpdASTRO.htm.

Faculty Research Participation Appointments allow full-time faculty to participate in research at the following centers. Deadline: None.

Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials Directorate, Tyndall Air Force Base–Research, development, test and evaluation activities in the biological sciences, computer sciences, engineering, environmental sciences, physical sciences and related scientific disciplines. Contact: Sharon Kern, 865-576-9361; kerns@orau.gov; http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/USAF/gi-fMD.htm.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–Research on infectious disease, environmental health, epidemiology, or occupational safety and health. Contact: Linda McCamant, 865-576-1089; mccamanl@orau.gov; http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/CDC/gi-fRP.htm.

National Center for Toxicological Research–Research on biological effects of potentially toxic chemicals and solutions to toxicology problems that have a major impact on human health and the environment. Contact: Linda McCamant (see above), or http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/FDA/gi-fNCTR.htm.

National Library of Medicine–This opportunity is available to research staff members also. Research disciplines include computer science, health care, library science, medical education, medical informatics, and related scientific disciplines. Contact: Elizabeth Kittrell, 865-241-3319; kittrell@orau.gov; http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/nlm/gi-fRP.htm.

U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory, Hawaii–Research to locate, exhume and identify remains of individuals killed in military service. Contact: Sharon Kern (see above), or http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/USARMY/gi-fRPCIL.htm.

Postdoctoral appointments are available at the following agencies. Deadline: None.

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry--Program areas include exposure and disease registries, health investigations, public health assessments, toxicological profiles, emergency response, and health education. Contact: Linda McCamant (see above), or http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/DOE/gi-rgpdATSDR.htm.

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research–Research concerning biologics. Disciplines: bioengineering, biostatistics, life sciences, medical sciences, physical sciences, related scientific disciplines. Contact: Linda McCamant (see above), or http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/FDA/gi-rgpdCBER.htm.

Center for Devices and Radiological Health–Research on medical devices and radiation emissions from electronic products. Contact: Linda McCamant (see above), or http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/FDA/gi-rgpdCDRH.htm.

Center for Drug Evaluation and Research–Research concerning human drug products. Disciplines include: bioengineering, biostatistics, life sciences, medical sciences, pharmacology, physical sciences, related scientific disciplines. Contact: Linda McCamant (see above), or http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/FDA/gi-rgpdCDER.htm.

 

Center for Veterinary Medicine–Research concerning food additives and drugs given to animals. Contact: Linda McCamant (see above), or http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/FDA/gi-rgpdCVM.htm.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention–Research on infectious diseases. Contact: Linda McCamant (see above), or http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/CDC/gi-rgpdCDC.htm.

National Center for Environmental Assessment–Research related to environmental and physical sciences concerns. Contact: Tom Richmond, 865-576-2194; richmont@orau.gov; http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/EPA/gi-rgpdNCEA.htm.

National Center for Toxicological Research–Research on biological effects of potentially toxic chemicals and solutions to toxicology problems that have a major impact on human health and the environment. Contact: Linda McCamant (see above), or http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/FDA/gi-rgpdNTCR.htm.

National Energy Technology Laboratory–Research in advanced energy technologies and procedures. Contact: Kathy Ketner, 865-576-3426; ketnerk@orau.gov; http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/NETL/gi-rgpdPRP.htm.

National Exposure Research Laboratory–Areas of interest include engineering, environmental sciences, life sciences, physical sciences, and related scientific disciplines in environmental areas. Contact: Tom Richmond (see above), or http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/EPA/gi-rgpdNERL.htm.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory–Research in a broad range of science and engineering activities related to basic sciences, energy, and environment. Contact: Bonnie DeJarnette, 865-241-4832; dejarneb@orau.gov; http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/ornl/gi-pdRA.htm.

Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water–Studies related to development and implementation of drinking water regulations. Contact: Tom Richmond (see above), or http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/EPA/gi-rgpdIOW.htm.

U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory, Hawaii–Research to locate, exhume and identify remains of individuals killed during military service. Contact: Sharon Kern, 865-576-9361; kerns@orau.gov; http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/USARMY/gi-rgCILH.htm.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region Five–Research related to environmental and physical science concerns at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Chicago, Illinois. Contact: Tom Richmond (see above), or http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/EPA/gi-rgpdEPA.htm.

Post-Master’s Research Participation Program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory–Research in a broad range of science and engineering activities related to basic sciences, energy, and the environment. Contact: Bonnie DeJarnette (see above), or http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/ornl/gi-rgPMRP.htm. Deadline: None.

Scientific Visitors Program--National Center for Biotechnology Information–Opportunities for faculty, postdoctorals and research scientists to participate in informatics research and training programs. Deadline: None. Contact: Elizabeth Kittrell, 865-241-3319; kittrell@orau.gov; http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/nlm/gi-fpdNCBI.htm.

Student Internship at the Office of Water–Opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students to participate in studies related to development and implementation of drinking water regulations. Deadline: None. Contact: Tom Richmond (see above), or http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/EPA/gi-gugIOW.htm.

Student Research Participation at the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention--Support for graduate and undergraduate students to participate in research on infectious diseases, environmental health, epidemiology, or occupational safety and health. Deadline: None. Contact: Linda McCamant (see above), or http://www.orau.gov/orise/edu/CDC/gi-gugRP.htm.

PEW CHARITABLE TRUSTS

Environment Program–Support to promote policies and practices that protect the global atmosphere and preserve healthy forest and marine ecosystems. Deadline: None. Contact: 215-575-9050; info@pewtrusts.com; http://www.pewtrusts.org.

Health & Human Services: National Program–Support to promote the health and well-being of the American people and strengthen disadvantaged communities. Deadline and Contact: See Above.

Public Policy Grants–Support for projects that strengthen democratic life in America, primarily by supporting projects to restore public trust in elections, increase civic engagement of young Americans, and improve public understanding of and confidence in government. Deadline and Contact: See Above.

PINKERTON FOUNDATION

Support for projects concerning economically disadvantaged children, youth and families, and severely learning disabled children and adults of borderline intelligence. Within these groups, the Foundation seeks to support programs that develop individual competencies, instill values and increase opportunities to participate in society. Of particular interest are projects that advance healthy development of youth and demonstrate promising new ideas for greater program effectiveness. Deadline: None; Letter of Inquiry required. Contact: 212-332-3385; http://fdncenter.org/grantmaker/pinkerton/guide.html.

POPULATION COUNCIL

Reproductive Biomedicine Fellowships--Support for individuals with an M.D., Ph.D. or equivalent to pursue advanced study in the physiology and biochemistry of reproduction. Contact: Fellowship Secretary, 212-327-8731; biomed@popcbr.rockefeller.edu; http://www.popcouncil.org/opportunities/biofellowships.html. Deadline: None.

PORTER (IRWIN ANDREW) FOUNDATION

Support for projects that foster connections between communities and individuals, create partnerships with multiple organizations and those that enable beneficiaries to give as well as receive. Deadlines: 2/1/03, 3/1/03, 8/1/03, 11/1/03. Contact: 612-343-5994; iapfoundation@iapfoundation.org; http://www.iapfoundation.org/applic.html.

PUBLIC ENTITY RISK INSTITUTE

Funding for projects in the following priority areas: worker’s compensation; employment practice liability; law enforcement liability; bringing risk management to small, public, private and nonprofit organizations that do not have a risk manager; respondong to the threat of terrorism; energy liability; and managing technology risks. Deadline: None; Letter of Inquiry required. Contact: Claire Lee Reiss, 703-352-1846; creiss@riskinstitute.org; http://www.riskinstitute.org/funding.asp.

RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME FOUNDATION

Support for basic and clinical research studies of restless legs syndrome (RLS); basic science leading to a better understanding of RLS, innovative approaches, interdisciplinary studies, and support of postdoctoral candidates will be given priority. Areas in need of further research include, but are not limited to: epidemiology; neurophysiology; dopamine; genetics; iron; treatment models; and circadian rhythm. Deadlines: 12/1/02 (Letter of Intent); 2/1/03 (Application). Contact: 507-287-6465; research@rls.org; http://www.rls.org/research/grants.htm.

ROSS (DOROTHEA HAUS) FOUNDATION

Funding to advance the moral, mental, and physical well being of children in all parts of the world. Primary interests are relieving suffering among children who are sick, handicapped, injured, disfigured, orphaned or otherwise vulnerable, through programs of direct service or medical research. Deadline: Initial contact should be an inquiry (by telephone, letter, or email). Contact: Wayne S. Cook, 716-473-6006; dhrossfnd@aol.com.

ROTARY FOUNDATION

World Peace Scholarships–Funding to pursue a 2-year master’s-level degree in international studies, peace studies, and conflict resolution at a Rotary Center. Deadline: 18 months prior to enrollment. Contact: 847-866-3000; http://www.rotary.org/foundation/educational/amb_scho/centers/infropros.html.

RUBIN (SHELLEY AND DONALD) FOUNDATION

Support for innovative efforts to transform society’s institutions, making them more responsible, and empower individuals to develop their full potential. Areas of interest are: inclusion of art from non-Western European cultures into the mainstream of scholarship and display; study of the relationship between art, culture and humanity; collection, care, preservation, study and public display of the ancient art of the Himalayas, with the goal of exploring relationships between this art and that of other cultures. Deadline: None; Letter of Intent required. Contact: Evelyn Jones Rich, 212-780-2035; erich@sdrubin.org; http://www.sdrubin.org/guidelines.html.

SAGE (RUSSELL) FOUNDATION

Small Grants Program in Behavioral Economics–Support for high quality research in behavioral economics and to encourage young investigators to enter this developing field. Deadline: None. Contact: Bindu Chadaga, 212-750-6000; info@rsage.org; http://www.russellsage.org/programs/proj_reviews/small-grants-app.htm.

SCAIFE FAMILY FOUNDATION

Funding to support and develop programs that strengthen families, address issues surrounding health and welfare of women and children, promote animal welfare, and demonstrate beneficial interaction between humans and animals. Another area of interest is early intervention and prevention efforts in the area of drug and alcohol addiction. Deadline: None. Contact: Barbara M. Sloan, http://www.scaife.com/family1.pdf.

SCHALKENBACH (ROBERT) FOUNDATION

Funding for scholarly and educational projects based on concepts of economic and social justice originally expounded by Henry George in “Progress and Poverty.” Deadline: None; Letter of Inquiry required. Contact: 212-683-6424; staff@schalkenbach.org; http://www.schalkenbach.org/grants.html.

SIMON (WILLIAM E.) FOUNDATION, INC.

Funding areas include, but are not restricted to: education, religion, youth welfare, athletics, and social welfare. Deadline: None. Contact: J. Peter Simon, 973-898-0290; http://www.wesimonfoundation.org/found.nsf/guidelines.htm?OpenPage&charset=iso-8859-1.

SMITHERS (CHRISTOPHER D.) FOUNDATION, INC.

Support for projects in the field of alcoholism prevention and education. Deadline: None. Contact: Thomas D. Croci, 516-676-0067; smithersfoundation@con.net; http://www.smithersfoundation.org/page33.html.

SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION

National Air and Space Museum Internships are offered to college undergraduate and graduate students. Deadline: 12/15/03. Contact: Myra Banks-Smith, 202-357-4223; http://www.si.edu/ofg/intern.htm.

Smithsonian Center for Materials Research and Education—Postdoctoral Research Fellowships support research on problems in the application of techniques of the physical sciences to problems in art history, anthropology, archaeology, and the history of technology. Deadline: None; it is recommended that applicants first contact the appropriate Center staff member. Contact: Fellowship Coordinator, 301-238-3700; siofg@si.edu; http://www.si.edu/ofg/fell.htm#fscmre.

SOCIETY FOR INDUSTRIAL AND APPLIED MATHEMATICS

Student Travel Awards support travel to the Society’s upcoming conferences. Conference topics include discrete algorithms, imaging science, data mining, optimization, discrete mathematics, and computational models and simulation for intra-cellular processes. Deadline: Two months before the first day of meeting. Contact: Allison Bogardo, 215-382-9800; bogardo@siam.org; http://www.siam.org/prizes/travel.htm.

SOCIETY OF TOXICOLOGY

Colgate-Palmolive-SOT Institutional Award for Internships in Alternative Methods–Funding for graduate students to participate in research involving in vitro toxicology or alternative methods to reduce, replace or refine use of animals in toxicological research and encourage pursuit of graduate training. Deadline: Applications accepted until all funds have been committed. Contact: Betty Eidemiller, 703-438-3115; bettye@toxicology.org; http://www.toxicology.org/Information/AwardsFellowships/awards.html.

SONY USA FOUNDATION

Support in the areas of education, health and welfare, minority affairs, civic efforts, and arts and culture; the goal is to bring commitment and innovation to the task of strengthening education at the primary and secondary levels, and selected higher education initiatives. Contact: Sony Electronics Inc., www.sony.com/sca/philanthropy.html. Deadline: None.

TOYOTA USA FOUNDATION

Support to improve the quality of K-12 education, with a primary interest in mathematics and science. Deadline: None. Contact: Foundation Administrator, 310-468-6766;
http://www.toyota.com/html/about/community_care/usa_foundation/guidelines.html.

TRAINA (NICK) FOUNDATION

Funding for projects concerning diagnosis, research, treatment, and/or family support of manic-depression, suicide prevention, child abuse and children in jeopardy, and assistance to struggling musicians in the areas of health and mental illness. Deadline: None. Contact: 415-771-4224; info@nicktrainafoundation.org; http://www.nicktrainafoundation.org/main.htm.

TRUMAN (HARRY S.) LIBRARY INSTITUTE

Undergraduate Student Grant–Support for students writing senior theses on some aspect of the life and career of Harry S. Truman, or of the public and foreign policy issues which were prominent during the Truman years. Deadline: 12/01/02. Contact: Grants Administrator, 816-833-0425; lisa.sullivan@truman.nara.gov; http://www.trumanlibrary.org/grants/.

VERIZON FOUNDATION

Funding in the areas of literacy, workforce development, employee volunteerism, and community technology development. Deadline: None. Contact: 212-395-2121, Verizon_Foundation@verizon.com; http://foundation.verizon.com/04004.html.

VETLESEN (G. UNGER) FOUNDATION

Funding for religious, charitable, scientific, literary and educational uses and purposes. Areas of interest are oceanographies, climate studies and other earth sciences. Deadline: None. Contact: George Rowe, Jr., 212-586-0700; info@monelvetlesen.org; http://www.monellvetlesen.org/vetlesen/appguide.htm.

VOLKSWAGEN-STIFTUNG FOUNDATION

Global Structures and Governance–Support for theoretical and empirical research into the possibilities of influencing and guiding global structures and patterns of order and the foundation, problems, and forms of transnational relations. Deadline: None. Contact: Alfred Schmidt, Telephone 49 511 8381 237; schmidt@volkswagenstiftung.de; http://www.volkswagen-stiftung.de.

Innovation Processes in Economy and Society–Support for research focusing on the complexity of innovation processes, taking into account the multifaceted interaction between social, economic and scientific technological factors, including interdisciplinary research projects and conferences. Deadline and Contact: See Above.

Unity Amidst Variety? Intellectual Foundation and Requirements for an Enlarged Europe–Support for historical and contemporary research into eastern Europe with the aim of providing new insights into the variety and heterogeneity of this cultural area with respect to its relations and connections with the rest of Europe, with an emphasis on joint research projects between Germany and foreign, particularly eastern European scientists. Deadline: None. Contact: Wolfgang Levermann, Telephone 49 (0)511 8381 212; levermann@volkswagenstiftung.de; http://www.volkswagen-stiftung.de/english/merkblat/merkeinh.htm.

WALLACE GLOBAL FUND

Funding is intended to catalyze and leverage critically needed global progress towards an equitable and environmentally sustainable society with preference to projects that involve: policy research and action on a global or regional level; public/private sector partnerships; collaboration among non-governmental organizations; and utilization of market mechanisms; activities likely to lead to broad policy changes, or those that leverage substantial new public or private resources; and activities that utilize market mechanisms for future financial sustainability. Deadline: None. Contact: 202-452-1530; tkroll@wgf.org; http://www.wgf.org/app_procedures.html.

Reader’s Digest Funds--Support of education, arts, and culture, with emphasis on programs that will develop effective educational leaders to improve student learning; provide high-quality informal learning opportunities
for children and families in communities; and promote new standards of practice to increase participation in the arts. Deadline: Initial contact should be a brief letter of inquiry. Contact: 212-251-9700; wrdf@wallacefunds.org; http://www.wallacefunds.org/overview/guidelines.cfm.

WEYERHAEUSER COMPANY FOUNDATION

Support to increase public understanding of issues related to the forest products industry; for specialized programs that address the needs of society that are uniquely relevant to the forest products industry; and for industry-related projects that promote further understanding of how the forest products industry responds to a changing society, including topics such as: work place diversity, energy, forest practices, international trade, environmental effects of
manufacturing, resource utilization and conservation. Contact: 253-924-3159; foundation@weyerhaeuser.com; http://www.weyerhaeuser.com/community/philanthropy/weyerfoundation.asp. Deadline: None.

WOMEN’S SPORTS FOUNDATION

Homophobia in Sport Project Grant–Support for development of research, community outreach and educational programs addressing the issue of homophobia and other barriers to women’s participation in sports. Deadline: None. Contact: 800-227-3988; wosport@aol.com; http://www.womenssportsfoundation.org/cgi-bin/iowa/funding/featured.html?record=19.

Jackie Joyner-Kersee Minority Internship, Zina Garrison Minority Internship–Funding for women of color to gain experience in a sports-related career and interact in the sports community. Deadline: None. Contact: 800-227-3988; wosport@aol.com; http://www.womenssportsfoundation.org/cgi-bin/iowa/funding/featured.html?record=5; http://www.womenssportsfoundation.org/cgi-bin/iowa/funding/featured.html?record=14.

WOODS (TIGER) FOUNDATION

Funding to create or positively influence environments; thereby, enabling children and youth to develop to their maximum potential. Deadline: None. Contact: 714-816-1806; jarce@twfound.org; http://www.twfound.org/charity/grants.sps?sid=941&lid=1&gra=2.

-- William Gosnold, Interim Director, Office of Research and Program Development.